Bloodstream Test Might Yield Early Warning of Alzheimer’s

 

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Blood Test Might Yield Early Warning of Alzheimer’s Privacy & Trust Info TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) Leaky blood vessels in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease. Blood Test Might Yield Early Warning of Alzheimer’s TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 Leaky blood vessels in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers say. They followed 161 older adults for five years and found that those with the most severe memory declines had the greatest leakage in their brain’s blood vessels, regardless of whether the Alzheimer’s-related proteins.

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) Leaky blood vessels in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers say. TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) Leaky blood vessels in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers say.

They followed 161 older adults for five years and found that those with the most severe memory declines had the greatest leakage in their brain’s blood vessels, regardless of whether the Alzheimer’s-related proteins amyloid and tau were present. TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) Leaky blood vessels in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers say. READ: 7 Early Signs Of Alzheimer’s They followed 161 older adults for five years and found that those with the most severe memory declines had the greatest leakage in their brain’s blood vessels, regardless of whether the Alzheimer’s-related.

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) Leaky blood vessels in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers say. They followed 161 older adults for five years and found that those with the most severe memory declines had the greatest leakage in their brain’s blood vessels, regardless of whether the Alzheimer’s-related proteins amyloid and tau were present.

Blood Test Might Show Early Warning of Alzheimer’s disease Although doctors can use brain scans or spinal taps to detect Alzheimer’s in patients with symptoms, there’s no way to test for the disease in seemingly healthy individuals. THURSDAY, Aug. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) A simple blood test helped pinpoint the early signs of Alzheimer’s in a new study. Up to two decades before people develop Alzheimer’s symptoms such as. That’s why a new early warning system, requiring just a small blood sample and giving several decades of warning, could be revolutionary.

The new process works using mass spectrometry to ionise and scan blood for a particular peptide or amino acid compound thought to be linked to amyloid beta concentrations. While a lot more testing is required to verify the link, it’s a promising start. A blood test for Alzheimer’s might be just two years away.

Abdul Hyeat King’s College London and his colleagues have identified 10 proteins in blood that can predict who will develop Alzheimer’s.

List of related literature:

The test works because Alzheimer’s disease greatly magnifies transience above and beyond any changes associated with normal aging.

“The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers” by Daniel L. Schacter
from The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers
by Daniel L. Schacter
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2002

These data suggest there could be iron deficiency in the Alzheimer’s brain despite the reported increase in iron.

“Handbook of Behavior, Food and Nutrition” by Victor R. Preedy, Ronald Ross Watson, Colin R. Martin
from Handbook of Behavior, Food and Nutrition
by Victor R. Preedy, Ronald Ross Watson, Colin R. Martin
Springer New York, 2011

These results suggest that elevated plasma homocysteine may be an independent risk factor for the development of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia (Seshadri et al., 2002).

“Epidemiology of Chronic Disease: Global Perspectives” by Randall E. Harris
from Epidemiology of Chronic Disease: Global Perspectives
by Randall E. Harris
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2013

levels; after 30 days, early-onset Alzheimer’s patients saw a decrease in blood levels of histamine of about 55% compared with baseline, whereas late-onset individuals saw a 45% decrease.

“Textbook of Natural Medicine E-Book” by Joseph E. Pizzorno, Michael T. Murray
from Textbook of Natural Medicine E-Book
by Joseph E. Pizzorno, Michael T. Murray
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

As well, it has been hypothesized that increased aluminum levels in the brain and the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease may be linked.

“Hamilton and Hardy's Industrial Toxicology” by Raymond D. Harbison, Marie M. Bourgeois, Giffe T. Johnson
from Hamilton and Hardy’s Industrial Toxicology
by Raymond D. Harbison, Marie M. Bourgeois, Giffe T. Johnson
Wiley, 2015

Willette AA, et al: Insulin resistance predicts brain amyloid deposition in late middle-aged adults, Alzheimers Dement 11:504, 2014.

“Krause's Food & the Nutrition Care Process, Mea Edition E-Book” by L. Kathleen Mahan, Janice L. Raymond
from Krause’s Food & the Nutrition Care Process, Mea Edition E-Book
by L. Kathleen Mahan, Janice L. Raymond
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Tests of B12 and folate levels are now part of the standard workup for dementia, or unexplained neurological or functional decline (Damon and Andreadis, 2017).

“Ebersole & Hess' Toward Healthy Aging E-Book: Human Needs and Nursing Response” by Theris A. Touhy, Kathleen F Jett
from Ebersole & Hess’ Toward Healthy Aging E-Book: Human Needs and Nursing Response
by Theris A. Touhy, Kathleen F Jett
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

This is bad news for those with Alzheimer’s or other neurodegenerative conditions.

“Stop Alzheimer's Now!: How to Prevent and Reverse Dementia, Parkinson's, ALS, Multiple Sclerosis, and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders” by Bruce Fife, Russell L Blaylock
from Stop Alzheimer’s Now!: How to Prevent and Reverse Dementia, Parkinson’s, ALS, Multiple Sclerosis, and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders
by Bruce Fife, Russell L Blaylock
Piccadilly Books, 2016

It has been demonstrated that A13+ can cross link polynucleotides and that Alzheimer patients apparently have reduced transferrin activity.

“Textbook of Drug Design and Discovery” by H. John Smith, H. John Williams, Tommy Liljefors, Povl Krogsgaard-Larsen, Ulf Madsen
from Textbook of Drug Design and Discovery
by H. John Smith, H. John Williams, et. al.
CRC Press, 2002

These reports suggest that the brain of patients with Alzheimer disease is associated with inadequate antioxidant status and/or increased oxidative stress.

“Handbook of Vitamins” by Robert B. Rucker, John W. Suttie, Donald B. McCormick
from Handbook of Vitamins
by Robert B. Rucker, John W. Suttie, Donald B. McCormick
CRC Press, 2001

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
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8 comments

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  • There are some things you don’t want to know, and this may be one of them… Not until we have a reliable, effective way to treat and cure it.

  • They begin with Breaking news, GREAT News to share: They revel in the fact that they can tell you if will get a dreaded disease, 2 decades prior to showing symptoms..I ask: Would we not benefit far more from news regarding steps we can take right now, that better our chances of not getting AD? Reports like this and others, convince me that Big Media LOVES disease and its detection as opposed to natural cures and empowering information to impact our genes to steer us clear of disease.

    AD and other dementias are avoidable if we take steps while we are healthy. A Plant Based diet is the most important step towards overall health and certainly brain health. Working out, movement, socializing and spiritual work. Also, make sure your environment is free of noxious fumes, like mold, as 70% of all reports of AD result from exposure to this or a similar brain toxin. This is your recipe for health and avoiding AD. But, the News Media will never report this!

  • hey all, The most success that I have ever had was with Rays perfect remedy (just google it) Without a doubt the most amazing results that I have ever had for Diabetes.

  • This is just more garbage from your friendly drug pushing company. Test = no healing = no cure = worthless.
    Put your faith in God and never in man.
    Peace.

  • Nice test but no cure if you have it. The ONLY thing this is good for at present and that’s only if future test results become more valid is long term care insurance.

  • Human restraints are NOT effective treatment for those with alzheimer’s! Prion Diseases are triggered at any age by things like unsanitary conditions, human restraints alone, ect..! The medical field must be reminded medieval treatment should have ZERO tolerance in the medical field!

  • A terrible disease that I hope no one catches, but being able to catch it early on will help a lot of people, for early treatment and planning for lifestyle changes proactively.

  • Thank you so much for this report. My dad had Alzheimer’s for 10 years and passed away a month ago. If you can afford it, please think about donating to the Alzheimer’s Association.