Asian Women Less inclined to Get Follow-up Tests After Abnormal Mammogram

 

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MONDAY, June 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) Asian women in the San Francisco area were less likely than white women to get follow-up tests following an abnormal mammogram result, researchers report. Women who receive suspicious mammogram results are urged to get checked in a timely manner to rule out breast cancer, which should be treated as early as possible to ensure the. MONDAY, June 12, 2017 (HealthDay News)—Asian women in the San Francisco area were less likely than white women to get follow-up tests following an abnormal mammogram result, researchers report. Women who receive suspicious mammogram results are urged to get checked in a timely manner to rule out breast cancer, which should be treated as early as possible to ensure the.

5 Min Read (Reuters Health) After an abnormal mammogram, Asian women in the U.S. are less likely than white women to get follow-up tests to determine if they have breast cancer. MONDAY, June 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) Asian women in the San Francisco area were less likely than white women to get follow-up tests following an abnormal mammogram result, researchers report. Women who receive suspicious mammogram results are urged to get checked in a timely manner to rule out breast cancer, which should be treated as early as possible to ensure the.

Women with an abnormal mammogram result need follow-up tests to check whether the finding indicates breast cancer, which should be treated at the earliest possible stage. In a recent study, Asian women were less likely to receive appropriate follow-up treatment after an abnormal mammogram compared with White women. Asian-American women are less likely to receive timely follow-up treatment after an abnormal mammogram compared to white women, according to a. The findings showed that Asian ethnicity was associated with delays in follow-up imaging after abnormal screening mammograms. Among Asian women, Vietnamese and Filipina women had the longest span before following up – 32 and 28 days respectively – while Japanese women had the shortest at 19 days.

A small number of women will have breast cancer. It’s important to get follow-up without delay. That way, if you have breast cancer, it can be treated as soon as possible. Follow-up tests Types of follow-up tests. If you have an abnormal finding on a mammogram, the follow-up tests you’ll have depend on the recommendations of the radiologist.

According to the American Cancer Society, about 10% of women who have a mammogram will be called back for more tests. But only 8% to 10% of those women will need a biopsy and 80% of those biopsies. If you get called back, it’s usually within a week to take new pictures or get other tests. Fewer than 1 in 10 women called back for more tests are found to have cancer. What else could it be?

A suspicious finding may be just dense breast tissue, a cyst. Other times, the image just isn’t clear and needs to be retaken.

List of related literature:

After an abnormal finding on a screening mammogram, African-American, Hispanic, and Asian women all had less timely follow-up than whites, and African-American women were much less likely than white women to undergo biopsy (Chang et al., 1996).

“Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care (with CD)” by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Committee on Understanding and Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, Alan R. Nelson, Adrienne Y. Stith, Brian D. Smedley
from Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care (with CD)
by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2009

Unfortunately, racial and ethnic minority women are less likely than White women to receive adequate mammography screening, and African American women in particular are more likely to have advanced tumors on diagnosis than are women from all other racial and ethnic minority groups (Smith-Bindman et al., 2006).

“The Handbook of Health Behavior Change, Third Edition” by Sally A. Shumaker, PhD, Judith K. Ockene, PhD, MEd, MA, Kristin A. Riekert, PhD
from The Handbook of Health Behavior Change, Third Edition
by Sally A. Shumaker, PhD, Judith K. Ockene, PhD, MEd, MA, Kristin A. Riekert, PhD
Springer Publishing Company, 2008

The researchers posited that the trends are due to differences in breast cancer screening rates, as additional research in the same state had shown that black women were less likely to have received mammograms and were more likely to have been diagnosed at a late stage (16).

“Principles and Practice of Public Health Surveillance” by Lisa M. Lee, Stephen B. Thacker, Michael E. St. Louis
from Principles and Practice of Public Health Surveillance
by Lisa M. Lee, Stephen B. Thacker, Michael E. St. Louis
Oxford University Press, 2010

Since women with risk factors—particularly a family history of breast cancer—are at higher risk going into the screening than the average woman, they would be expected to benefit more from mammography.

“Strange Glow: The Story of Radiation” by Timothy J. Jorgensen
from Strange Glow: The Story of Radiation
by Timothy J. Jorgensen
Princeton University Press, 2017

Asian women cited unawareness of mammography tests, gender and modesty concerns unique to their cultural beliefs, and fear resulting from a sense of vulnerability to breast cancer.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Asian Pacific women are the least likely to have an annual gynecological exam or to ever have had a mammogram.

“The Reader's Companion to U.S. Women's History” by Wilma Pearl Mankiller, Gwendolyn Mink, Marysa Navarro, Gloria Steinem, Barbara Smith
from The Reader’s Companion to U.S. Women’s History
by Wilma Pearl Mankiller, Gwendolyn Mink, et. al.
Houghton Mifflin Company, 1999

Given that only 40% of breast cancer occur in post­menopausal women in many Asian countries including Malaysia, compared to close to 80% in many Caucasian countries, the proportion of risk attributable to genetic factors is likely to be correspondingly higher in Asians.

“AACR 2017 Proceedings: Abstracts 3063-5947” by American Association for Cancer Research
from AACR 2017 Proceedings: Abstracts 3063-5947
by American Association for Cancer Research
CTI Meeting Technology, 2017

Asian/Pacific Islanders and whites had no difference in mammography utilization.1 Lower rates are associated with failure to have a regular primary physician who repeatedly recommends screening mammography.

“Physical Examination and Health Assessment E-Book” by Carolyn Jarvis
from Physical Examination and Health Assessment E-Book
by Carolyn Jarvis
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Asian women born and raised in Asia have one-fifth the risk of developing breast cancer that American women have.

“The Reproductive System at a Glance” by Linda J. Heffner, Danny J. Schust
from The Reproductive System at a Glance
by Linda J. Heffner, Danny J. Schust
Wiley, 2010

Breast and cervical cancer screening rates are lower for Asian American women than for any other ethnic group in California.

“Race, Ethnicity, and Language Data: Standardization for Health Care Quality Improvement” by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Care Services, Subcommittee on Standardized Collection of Race/Ethnicity Data for Healthcare Quality Improvement, David R. Nerenz, Bernadette McFadden, Cheryl Ulmer
from Race, Ethnicity, and Language Data: Standardization for Health Care Quality Improvement
by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Care Services, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2009

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Too late…I slammed head-first, into that panic button. Note to self-never get a mammogram close of near the weekend….I fear the wait is going to kill me first. ����

  • My battle with Breast cancer started 4 years ago, after so many Chemo, Radiation and other natural therapy treatment that I took just to cure my Breast cancer, it all did not work for my condition. I have been treating this disease for the past 2 years, but today I’m here telling the world about my final victory over Breast cancer with the help of cannabis oil medication. This is a breakthrough in my family with so much Joy in our life today, I was told about Dr Odia, when I heard about his good works from my friend I requested for the contact information of this man, after some days passed as I was always praying to God for mercy, I said to myself that God could use this man to heal me totally after giving myself this thought I immediately contacted Dr Odia, I do really appreciate all the help and contribution from every member of my family for all they did for me. And if you have any kind of cancer diseases, there is no need to waste money on Chemo or Radiation, go get herbals from Dr Odia Herbalist home on Facebook or via: ([email protected]), this is a medication that totally kill cancer cells.

  • My battle with Breast cancer started 4 years ago, after so many Chemo, Radiation and other natural therapy treatment that I took just to cure my Breast cancer, it all did not work for my condition. I have been treating this disease for the past 2 years, but today I’m here telling the world about my final victory over Breast cancer with the help of cannabis oil medication. This is a breakthrough in my family with so much Joy in our life today, I was told about Dr Odia, when I heard about his good works from my friend I requested for the contact information of this man, after some days passed as I was always praying to God for mercy, I said to myself that God could use this man to heal me totally after giving myself this thought I immediately contacted Dr Odia, I do really appreciate all the help and contribution from every member of my family for all they did for me. And if you have any kind of cancer diseases, there is no need to waste money on Chemo or Radiation, go get herbals from Dr Odia Herbalist Home On Facebook or contact: ( [email protected] gmail.com ),this is a medication that totally kill cancer cells.