Are You Aware That Cardiovascular Disease Affects Women Of Color Differently

 

These remarkable women share their stories about heart disease, the #1 killer of women

Video taken from the channel: St. Vincent’s Health Services


 

Leslie Cho, MD | Women & Heart Disease

Video taken from the channel: Cleveland Clinic


 

Women & Heart Disease

Video taken from the channel: MedStar Health


 

Women & heart disease: How women’s heart attack symptoms may be different from men’s

Video taken from the channel: UnityPoint Health Cedar Rapids


 

Women and Heart Disease: What You Don’t Know May Kill You

Video taken from the channel: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health


 

How Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease Differ for Men and Women

Video taken from the channel: Inova Health System


 

Women and Heart Disease

Video taken from the channel: Cleveland Clinic


Thirteen facts about how heart disease affects women of color you might not know: Heart disease and stroke are the leading cause of death for all women. Non-Hispanic African-American women are twice as likely to have a stroke as non-Hispanic white women. 49 percent of African-American women over the age of 20 have heart disease. While cardiovascular disease is often viewed as a “man’s disease,” more women than men have died from the disease annually since 1984. Maria Perno Goldie, RDH, MS, discusses how heart disease manifests itself differently in the sexes, and provides different methods to help women reduce the risk of heart disease.

Did You Know That Heart Disease Affects Women Of Color Differently? The risk of cardiovascular disease among women, especially women of color is poorly understood, yet the statistics speak for themselves. Story From Henry Ford Health System: 4 Ways Heart Disease Affects Men & Women Differently.

Once thought a “man’s disease,” heart disease affects both sexes without bias and the ways it takes. The illustration in the sidebar shows the major symptoms of heart disease that affect most women. Call 911 right away if you have the symptoms of a heart attack. Talk to your doctor or nurse if you have any other symptoms of heart disease.

Sources. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015). Although heart disease is sometimes thought of as a man’s disease, almost as many women as men die each year of heart disease in the United States. This map shows death rates from heart disease in women in the United States. The darker red indicates a higher death rate.

Think about that for a second: If you’re sitting in a room with another Black woman, that means one of you might have some type of heart disease—and you don’t even know it. The American Heart Association (AHA) reports that: Only 36% of African-American women are aware of the fact that heart disease is their biggest health risk. Heart disease isn’t a gender-neutral condition. Although many of the risk factors are the same in women and men—including high cholesterol, inactivity, obesity, high blood pressure, and smoking—heart disease can develop differently in women than men, cause different symptoms, and have a different impact on long-term health. Men are at risk for heart attack much earlier in life than women.

Estrogen offers women some protection from heart disease until after menopause, when estrogen levels drop. This is why the average age for a heart attack in women is 70, but 66 in men.   The symptoms of heart attack can be different in women. A heart attack affects men and women in the same way, but the different sexes experience the symptoms differently.

Many women even dismiss the symptoms. Cardiologist Dr. John Ryan talks about why women’s symptoms are different, what symptoms women should look out for and why women shouldn’t dismiss heart disease as just a man’s health concern.

List of related literature:

There is little research regarding the difference in heart disease rates among women of color; there is little research on women in general.

“The Reader's Companion to U.S. Women's History” by Wilma Pearl Mankiller, Gwendolyn Mink, Marysa Navarro, Gloria Steinem, Barbara Smith
from The Reader’s Companion to U.S. Women’s History
by Wilma Pearl Mankiller, Gwendolyn Mink, et. al.
Houghton Mifflin Company, 1999

In a survey conducted by the American Heart Association (AHA) in 2003, only 13% of U.S. women (7% in 1997) perceived heart disease as a major health risk.14 Black and Hispanic women are less likely than white women to be aware that heart disease is the primary cause of death in women.

“Preventive Cardiology: A Companion to Braunwald's Heart Disease E-Book” by Roger Blumenthal, JoAnne Foody, Nathan D. Wong
from Preventive Cardiology: A Companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease E-Book
by Roger Blumenthal, JoAnne Foody, Nathan D. Wong
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Interestingly, The Dallas Heart Study showed that blacks have a prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis similar to whites.

“Sex Differences in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathophysiology” by Babbette LaMarca, Ph.D., Barbara T. Alexander, PhD, FAHA, FAPS
from Sex Differences in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathophysiology
by Babbette LaMarca, Ph.D., Barbara T. Alexander, PhD, FAHA, FAPS
Elsevier Science, 2019

For example, one study showed that African American women with coronary artery disease (CAD) were two times more likely to have a heart attack than white women.

“Bioethics and Biosafety” by M. K. Sateesh
from Bioethics and Biosafety
by M. K. Sateesh
I.K. International Publishing House Pvt. Limited, 2008

It is sponsored by the National Black Women’s Health Project, founded by Byllye Avery of Provincetown, whose work is motivated by a racial gap: black women are more likely to die of heart disease and breast cancer than white women, and their diabetes rate is 50 percent higher.

“Learning to be Old: Gender, Culture, and Aging” by Margaret Cruikshank
from Learning to be Old: Gender, Culture, and Aging
by Margaret Cruikshank
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2003

Another study concluded that Black and White patients are, to a large extent, treated by different physicians.

“Health Promotion and Aging: Practical Applications for Health Professionals” by David Haber, PhD
from Health Promotion and Aging: Practical Applications for Health Professionals
by David Haber, PhD
Springer Publishing Company, 2013

During the conference for nurse practitioners in New York, Lois Monteiro of Brown University pointed out that nearly three times as many women die of heart disease as cancer, yet heart disease is considered a men’s disease, and women don’t perceive themselves at risk.

“Fountain of Age” by Betty Friedan
from Fountain of Age
by Betty Friedan
Simon & Schuster, 2006

Women and Mexican Americans receive fewer cardiovascular drugs following myocardial infarction than men and non-Hispanic whites: The Corpus Christi Heart Project, 1988-1990.

“Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care (with CD)” by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Committee on Understanding and Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, Alan R. Nelson, Adrienne Y. Stith, Brian D. Smedley
from Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care (with CD)
by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2009

While there are no data on women of color, there is no reason to believe that the influence of fitness level on cardiovascular disease would be any different for these groups.

“Women and Sport: Interdisciplinary Perspectives” by D. M. Costa, D. Margaret Costa, Sharon Ruth Guthrie
from Women and Sport: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
by D. M. Costa, D. Margaret Costa, Sharon Ruth Guthrie
Human Kinetics, 1994

Regarding sex and ethnicity, the rate of death caused by heart disease and stroke is higher among men than women and higher among Blacks than Whites (see Fig. 2.3).

“Dying, Death, and Bereavement” by Lewis R. Aiken
from Dying, Death, and Bereavement
by Lewis R. Aiken
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2001

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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