Are You Able To Be Obese and Heart-Healthy

 

Obesity And Heart Risk

Video taken from the channel: CBS


 

Is Cardiovascular Disease Really Linked to a High-fat Diet?

Video taken from the channel: Demystifying Medicine


 

British Heart Foundation Your weight and heart disease

Video taken from the channel: British Heart Foundation


 

Obesity and Heart Disease

Video taken from the channel: Living Better


 

Obesity Length And Heart Disease

Video taken from the channel: Cleveland Clinic


 

Watch Active Fat cause heart disease.

Video taken from the channel: Diabetes UK


 

can you be healthy and overweight

Video taken from the channel: Jillian Michaels


Instead, the researchers found, obesity increases the risk for heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure, and the risk increases the more fat one carries around the waist. The research finds that obesity does raise risk for heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure. FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News)—A new British study of nearly 300,000 people dismantles the “obesity paradox,” a theory that claims being obese does not necessarily raise heart risks. Instead, the researchers found, obesity increases the risk for heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure, and the risk increases the more fat one carries around the waist. “The higher total body fat or fat around the abdomen, the greater the risk of heart disease and stroke in individuals without existing disease,” said lead researcher Dr. Stamatina Iliodromiti.

FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A new British study of nearly 300,000 people dismantles the “obesity paradox,” a theory that claims being obese does not necessarily raise heart risks. Instead, the researchers found, obesity increases the risk for heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure, and the risk increases the more fat one carries around the waist. FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) A new British study of nearly 300,000 people dismantles the “obesity paradox,” a theory that claims being obese does not necessarily raise heart risks. Instead, the researchers found, obesity increases the risk for heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure, and the risk increases the more fat one carries around the waist.

The researchers found that among obese individuals, 46 percent were heart healthy and had a 38 percent lower risk of dying than those obese people who were not heart healthy. Moreover, those healthy obese had the same reduced risk of heart disease and cancer as healthy normal-weight people, they added. ISLAMABAD (Online): A new British study of nearly 300,000 people dismantled the “obesity paradox,” a theory that claims being obese does not necessarily raise heart risks. Instead, the researchers found, obesity increases the risk for heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure, and the risk increases the more fat one carries around the waist. A new British study of nearly 300,000 people dismantled the “obesity paradox,” a theory that claims being obese does not necessarily raise heart risks.

Instead, the researchers found, obesity increases the risk for heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure, and the risk increases the more fat one carries around the waist. Can a person be both obese and healthy? That question is at the center of a new paper published in the Annals of Human Biology this month. In the paper, Dr.

William Johnson of. FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A new British study of nearly 300,000 people dismantles the “obesity paradox,” a theory that claims being obese does not necessarily raise heart risks. Instead, the researchers found, obesity increases the risk for heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure, and the risk increases the more fat one carries around the waist.

List of related literature:

Although the connection between obesity (BMI greater than 30) and coronary heart disease is well established, it remains unknown whether a similar link exists for those who are mildly overweight.

“Pathology for the Physical Therapist Assistant E-Book” by Catherine C. Goodman, Kenda S. Fuller
from Pathology for the Physical Therapist Assistant E-Book
by Catherine C. Goodman, Kenda S. Fuller
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

It is known that being severely overweight puts a load on the heart and increases the risk of high blood pressure and diabetes, but what was not known until fairly recently is just how many years of life are lost if a person is obese.

“Tabbner's Nursing Care: Theory and Practice” by Gabby Koutoukidis, Rita Funnell, Gabrielle Koutoukidis, Karen Lawrence, Jodie Hughson, Kate Stainton
from Tabbner’s Nursing Care: Theory and Practice
by Gabby Koutoukidis, Rita Funnell, et. al.
Elsevier Australia, 2008

However, some studies show that there is an association between obesity and risk of coronary death at the upper range of body weight, e.g. > 140% of ideal body weight or a BMI >30 (Donahue et al., 1987).

“Diet and Health: Implications for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk” by National Research Council, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Commission on Life Sciences, Committee on Diet and Health
from Diet and Health: Implications for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk
by National Research Council, Division on Earth and Life Studies, et. al.
National Academies Press, 1989

health prognosis) but there are limitations to its use; BMI tends to overestimate fat mass in individuals who are active and have a high muscle mass and to underestimate fat in individuals who are sedentary.

“Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book” by Jane Coad, Melvyn Dunstall
from Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book
by Jane Coad, Melvyn Dunstall
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

• Obesity: People who have excess body fat, especially at the waist, are more likely to develop heart disease, even if they have no other risk factors.

“Health Assessment for Nursing Practice E-Book” by Susan Fickertt Wilson, Jean Foret Giddens
from Health Assessment for Nursing Practice E-Book
by Susan Fickertt Wilson, Jean Foret Giddens
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

The risks of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes tend to increase on a continuum with increasing BMI, but for practical purposes a person with a BMI of over 25 is considered overweight, while someone with a BMI of over 30 is obese.

“The Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke” by Judith Mackay, George A. Mensah, World Health Organization
from The Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke
by Judith Mackay, George A. Mensah, World Health Organization
World Health Organization, 2004

People who are 30 percent overweight are prone to heart disease.

“Chinese Health Care Secrets: A Natural Lifestyle Approach” by Henry B. Lin
from Chinese Health Care Secrets: A Natural Lifestyle Approach
by Henry B. Lin
Llewellyn Publications, 2000

Indeed, researchers are finding that overweight and obese individuals—people with high BMIs—who engage in regular physical activity have reduced health risks when compared to normal weight persons who do not exercise regularly (Blair and Brodney 1999; Bacon et al. 2002).

“The Binge Eating and Compulsive Overeating Workbook: An Integrated Approach to Overcoming Disordered Eating” by Carolyn Coker Ross
from The Binge Eating and Compulsive Overeating Workbook: An Integrated Approach to Overcoming Disordered Eating
by Carolyn Coker Ross
New Harbinger Publications, 2009

In most community-based studies [6, 7], obesity is associated with poorer outcomes: obese patients have a higher risk of dying than normal weighted individuals likely mediated by an increased incidence of diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease.

“Secondary Analysis of Electronic Health Records” by MIT Critical Data
from Secondary Analysis of Electronic Health Records
by MIT Critical Data
Springer International Publishing, 2016

BMI≥25 is considered overweight, whereas BMI≥30 is considered obese and places the person at significantly higher risk for CAD, diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, and certain types of cancer.

“Spinal Cord Injuries E-Book: Management and Rehabilitation” by Sue Ann Sisto, Erica Druin, Martha Macht Sliwinski
from Spinal Cord Injuries E-Book: Management and Rehabilitation
by Sue Ann Sisto, Erica Druin, Martha Macht Sliwinski
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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26 comments

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  • Jillian I think you should back your videos up with proper medical science not your own so called “Basic Science”. I am overweight and DO NOT have a single issue other than my weight. I am an ex medic so I do have some idea of what I am talking about. I am not nor ever have been diabetic, no hypertension nor cardiac issues, I dont have any other co-morbidities. My HDL and LDL are absolutely normal, my fasting glucose is 4mmol, my TSH profile is normal. My liver is not fatty nor ever has been. I exercise at least 2 hours a day including weights, cardio and swimming. Have you actually taken into account the inherited genes that may contribute to obesity? You talk like a real expert but in fact you do not have a single medical qualification to your name to back up anything you say

  • It’s important to say that being a bit overweight and being obese are very different. I’ve been obese for almost 15 years. I am only now seeing my blood sugar and cholesterol going up, but not enough to label me diabetic or need medication. I thought I was ok because my labs were always good. It does catch up to you. Not only that, but it’s incredibly uncomfortable to be this big. It’s okay to love your body and recognize that you aren’t in optimal health. She’s right, it’s not healthy, even if your labs are fine now.

  • I’m 10 pounds down on my 30 pound weight loss journey. All thanks to Jillian Michaels’ meal plan and body shred 60-day program.
    It’s hard, but results are happening…. ����

  • Someone who is overweight and makes the necessary lifestyle changes can get ‘healthy’ so damn quickly it’s mind-boggling…for some it can take just a month of good eating and exercise to achieve healthy blood pressure, good blood tests and better cardiovascular fitness. The excess weight just takes a little extra time to get back to normal.

  • Here I am. A year after I had a baby, back to my weight that I was the day I went into labor, except I don’t have a baby in my belly. I need help figuring it out to lose weight.

  • This is a weighty matter and we need to get the fats straight! There is slim chance of really getting to the bottom of it.

    It was so much simpler in the times before obesity and political correctness were invented!
    Before obesity was bad people could just eat what they wanted, no diet this or low fat that
    People need to be given the tools to lose weight, not shamed into it.
    It’s like the old saying, Give a man a fish feed him for a day, teach his wife to fish feed him for a lifetime

    Some fat people live long lives, some fit people die young. My own grandfather died when he was 5 snd he was very healthy!

  • great video. my birth dad died 2 years ago of a heart attack at 50 years old. ive told my doctors this and they told me it means i have heart disease in the family. so im told to lose weight and exercise. i also work in british heart foundation charity shop to help raise money for people who have heart disease in the family. 

  • Agreed!
    Don’t forget a cirrhosis of the liver, can clean up with healthy diet, and losing weight. My Cleveland Clinic Dr. says” fat will eventually go onto your organs”.(Fatty Liver) Especially as we age., especially not good for peri,,pre menopause women.

  • Okay Julian, we know you make your money from an over bloated diet industry.
    I bet you can’t explain why the so-called “normal weight” people get these same exact diseases.

  • It amazes me the mental gymnastics people are able to do to justify their bad lifestyles. There have been so many terms and phrases created just to prop these people up. All in the name of protecting their “feelings”. That and why so many people think the rules of science don’t apply to them and they’ll be the smoker who lives to be 100 or the 300 pounder that lives into their 90s. If there is someone to that affect, with very minute exceptions, it’s medications keeping their hearts pumping. Nothing more.

  • Yeah it kills me when i have to think 3 times before saying anything around someone with clear overweight problem. You may be healthy until certain stage being obese or overweight but then your body will give up and problems will start rolling in. I am just below treshold of overweight and I know this is not good for my body with all the fat storing toxins and affecting my hormones. And all these body positivity freaks! Saying how a super dimply very large girl is actually sexy and happy because she dresses nice and knows how to style her clothes. Doesnt anybody see that is is going to get sick really soon and then not be happy? Happiness should be about health not clothes…(facepalm)

  • I’ve been saying this for years and I was born with heart disease but I workout watch my diet. Some people think I’m stupid but I think it’s preventative maintenance!!

  • instead of ‘overweight’, title should say ‘overfat’. I am 15% bodyfat but i am on the cusp of being ‘overweight’ because of my body structure (short, stocky build with wide hips) and carrying a lot of muscle mass.

  • So… are you saying this has an impact on every person who is overweight? Even if it’s just a few kilos? ‘Cause with obesity, I completely agree that it is indeed harmful and certainly NOT HEALTHY but I don’t think this affects people with just some extra fat. Correct me if I’m wrong but, in my opinion, having a little gut isn’t harming you as long as you’re eating somewhat healthy.

  • Shes right I mean honestly I am highly obese started her workouts and calorie counting, and I have lost 5 pounds in 7 days! I am doing simple calories in and calories out. I do have good blood pressure even fat but its because I swim its an exercise. I hate to say this woman doesn’t sugar coat and she is straight up. I like the way she explains things and I like her attitude with everything. Its the most simple weight loss plan I have been on (its very similar to weight watchers) just cheaper! lol

  • What’s your definition of overweight? A bmi chart shows underweight healthy overweight obese and extremely obese, but most people on that chart that are overweight aren’t always fat or unhealthy, and their genetics can tell a different story, also it can be inaccurate especially if the person has a lot of muscle mass

  • She makes a really good point, but im still confused. I saw a video from blogilates about women categorized by their bmi. These two women are obese but they have very different lifestyles. This one woman works out alot (she’s a bodybuilder) and she eats balanced meals (mostly protein). Turns out her body fat percentage was significantly lower than the other obese woman. Her body fat percentage is at 5%. But her bmi says she’s obese. So is she still at risk for all of these health complications even though her body fat percentage is not above average?

  • People shouldn’t confuse health and beauty there are GORGEOUS overweight women and beautiful men that are fat but it isn’t healthy…

  • GIRL! I just love ya! I love your fearlessness in expressing factual truth. I love how you are bold and blunt. We obeseasties NEED that bold and blunt factual truth. Sure it often hurts our feelings. But that is because NO ONE has taught us HOW to not need to make excuses and justifications for how we got where we are. We got ourselves on the hamster’s wheel of bad eating and bad health choices, bad choices over all and we are stuck on that damn wheel and we hurt in our hearts and minds in addition to the physical pains in our bodies and we cry. Rivers to flood the earth, we cry. BECAUSE WE GOT OURSELVES STUCK and can’t quite figure out how to get off that hamster wheel of bad choosing. We can’t quite figure out HOW TO STICK TO A PLAN. How. To Stick. To A Plan.UNTIL! Someone like you enters our sphere. Bold and blunt and tellin’ it LIKE IT IS. THAT is where our help, REAL help, arrives. IF we but have ears to hear. And I do. AND………… I am stealing your phrase “Actively Engaged”. My new mantra. I thank you for continuing to be there for us.

  • I’m currently working to reverse what 3 years of a poor college lifestyle has done to my body. Y’all, don’t feel bad or ashamed. Feel empowered! In May of 2021, I’ll be climbing stairs at Manchu Picchu with incredibly high altitudes, and feeling great about what my body can do.

  • @robopaladin Im an obese person. I play tennis, I go bike riding, I even jog. I have a personal trainer as well. Im still obese. Its just my lot in life. I am still 35 lbs overweight. Im a very active person, and I hate that people label fat people as lazy. I am definitely not lazy. I do more than most thin people I know.

  • This video is 50% nonsense.
    Saturated fats are the good fats.
    There is no such thing ad bad cholesterol.
    The more fat you eat the lower your risk of heart disease.

  • Jillian, keep doing what you’re doing! I don’t think you should be faulted for being a health and fitness professional looking at things through a health and fitness lens. I think part of the issue is people are confusing health conversations with self-worth conversations. There’s a difference between a professional that I’ve sought out to help me become healthy and some random person slinging the word “fat”as an insult to hurt my feelings. Am I overweight? Yes. Do I love myself the way I am and surround myself with good friends? Yes, because I am worthy of love regardless of my health. Am I trying to lose weight to become healthier? Yes, because my healthcare providers recommended it and I want to take care of my long-term health. Separate issues.

  • This really hits home for me. I’m desperate for my teenage daughter with an eating disorder. She over eats and is over weight and pre diabetic. I’ve tried everything, but maybe letting her watch this video will help. Thank you Jillian!

  • That depends on how you define healthy. Health is multifaceted. Emotional health, spiritual health, physical health, many many factors. I’m overweight and I get my biometrics done yearly and all my markers are normal. I’m healthy because I have great habits, I exercise 5 days a week, I eat nutrient dense foods, and I’m still overweight. For your next video, talk about how diet-culture and the fitness industry has infiltrated our medical systems and sends the message that skinny is healthy. It’s unbelievable that intelligent people believe that just because someone is body privileged and is naturally thin, but eats shitty food everyday and smokes cigarettes is healthier than me because I’m “overweight” according to the bullshit BMI scale.

  • Actually, people living up to 100 years old will cost a lot more money than those dying around 50 because of an heart attack. From a strict economic point of view, the American model is the good one, probably that’s why politicians are not that motivated to find “solutions”