Alzheimer’s Genes Might Show Effects inside your 20s

 

Genetics of Alzheimer’s Disease

Video taken from the channel: Michigan Alzheimer’s Disease Center


 

Study indicates effects of Alzheimer’s gene may appear during childhood

httpv://youtu.be/YXqUp_E2hU?rel=0&modestbranding=1

Video taken from the channel: KHON2 News


 

Stalking an Alzheimer Gene Mutation in the Far Mountains of Colombia

Video taken from the channel: University of California Television (UCTV)


 

Characterizing Alzheimer’s Disease candidate genes and transcripts

Video taken from the channel: Integrated DNA Technologies


 

Signs of Alzheimer’s May Begin in Your 20s

Video taken from the channel: dailyRx


 

Alzheimer’s Gene May Show Effects on Brain Starting in Childhood

Video taken from the channel: Anthony Cirillo


 

Can Alzheimer’s Start In Your 20s?

Video taken from the channel: Seeker


Alzheimer’s Genes Might Show Effects in Your 20s. From the WebMD Archives. By Alan Mozes.

To get a better handle on how a family history of Alzheimer’s might affect future risk, the team. Alzheimer’s Genes Might Show Effects in Your 20s THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 Every college student misplaces keys or forgets an appointment from time to time. Usually it’s no big deal. But a new study warns that when young people with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease have memory lapses, it could be an early sign of something serious.

That’s the concern raised by a new memory test taken by nearly 60,000 men and women between the ages of 18 and 85. The results revealed that participants between 18 and 65 who had family members with Alzheimer’s scored lower than those who did not. That included even young adults in their 20s. Alzheimer’s genes might show effects in your 20s.

Every college student misplaces keys or forgets an appointment from time to time. Usually it’s no big deal. But a new study warns that when young. But a new study warns that when young people with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease have memory lapses, it could be an early sign of something serious.

Alzheimer’s Genes Might Show Effects in Your 20s. But a new study warns that when young people with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease have memory lapses, it could be an early sign of something serious. That’s the concern raised by a new memory test taken by nearly 60,000 men and women between the ages of. But a new study warns that when young people with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease have memory lapses, it could be an early sign of something serious. That’s the concern raised by a new memory test taken by nearly 60,000 men and women between the ages of 18 and 85.

Alzheimer’s Genes Might Show Effects in Your 20s Every college student misplaces keys or forgets an appointment from time to time. Usually it’s no big deal. But a new study warns that when young people with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease have memory lapses, it could be an early sign of something serious.

But a new study warns that when young people with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease have memory lapses, it could be an early sign of something serious. That’s the concern raised by a new memory test taken by nearly 60,000 men and women between the ages of 18 and 85. Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia characterized by the accumulation of toxic, misfolded beta-amyloid proteins that form plaques in the brain.

A new study in Neurology suggests that beta-amyloid may begin accumulating decades earlier than believed, starting as early as our 20s.

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While it remains to be seen if these findings extend to aging, there is already evidence that nondemented older adults with an increased genetic risk for developing dementia have a faster decline in episodic memory (Nilsson et al., 2006) along with altered functional brain activity (Lind et al., 2006).

“Handbook of Life-Span Development” by Lawerence K.W. Berg, PhD, Esq., Karen L. Fingerman, PhD, Toni C. Antonucci, PhD, Jacqui Smith, PhD, Cynthia Berg, PhD
from Handbook of Life-Span Development
by Lawerence K.W. Berg, PhD, Esq., Karen L. Fingerman, PhD, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2010

Although the cause of Alzheimer’s disease remains unknown, researchers now believe that some forms of the disease—particularly those that strike people before age 65— may be linked to the inheritance of at least 3 specific genes.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

This predisposition to early-onset Alzheimer’s disease may relate to the fact that the gene for the protein found in the amyloid deposits (amyloid precursor protein [APP]) is found on chromosome 21.

“USMLE Step 1 Secrets E-Book” by Thomas A. Brown, Sonali J Bracken
from USMLE Step 1 Secrets E-Book
by Thomas A. Brown, Sonali J Bracken
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Most affected adults develop Alzheimer disease in later life, possibly because of a gene dosage effect—the amyloid precursor protein gene is on chromosome 21.

“Emery's Elements of Medical Genetics E-Book” by Peter D Turnpenny, Sian Ellard
from Emery’s Elements of Medical Genetics E-Book
by Peter D Turnpenny, Sian Ellard
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

tDCS may also have positive effects on verbal memory in early onset Alzheimer’s disease, a diagnosis given when the patient meets criteria for DAT before age 65, likely due to a genetic mutation.

“Practical Guide to Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Principles, Procedures and Applications” by Helena Knotkova, Michael A. Nitsche, Marom Bikson, Adam J. Woods
from Practical Guide to Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Principles, Procedures and Applications
by Helena Knotkova, Michael A. Nitsche, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2019

However, first-degree relatives of patients with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease have an elevated risk of developing the disorder, and a genetic predisposition is now confirmed by the unequivocal association between polymorphisms in the apolipoprotein E (apoB) gene and all forms of Alzheimer’s disease.

“Shorter Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry” by Paul J. Harrison, Philip Cowen, Tom Burns, Mina Fazel
from Shorter Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry
by Paul J. Harrison, Philip Cowen, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2017

Other genetic risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease are not causative but either protect against or increase the risk of developing the disorder with increasing age.

“Encyclopedia of Disability” by Gary L Albrecht, Sharon L. Snyder, Thomson Gale (Firm), Jerome Bickenbach, David T. Mitchell, Sage Publications, Walton O. Schalick, III
from Encyclopedia of Disability
by Gary L Albrecht, Sharon L. Snyder, et. al.
SAGE Publications, 2006

The much rarer, early-onset dementia of the Alzheimer’s type is caused by single genes, such as a mutation of the amyloid precursor gene on chromosome 21 or the presenilin genes on chromosomes 1 and 14.

“Kaplan and Sadock's Study Guide and Self-examination Review in Psychiatry” by Benjamin J. Sadock, Virginia A. Sadock, Ze'ev Levin
from Kaplan and Sadock’s Study Guide and Self-examination Review in Psychiatry
by Benjamin J. Sadock, Virginia A. Sadock, Ze’ev Levin
Wolters Kluwer Health / Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007

Premature dementia similar to Alzheimer’s disease usually occurs during the fourth decade of life, and an increase in leukemia, diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders, and chronic infections are all common in individuals with Trisomy 21 (Wong, 1995).

“Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals” by Cecil R. Reynolds, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen
from Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals
by Cecil R. Reynolds, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen
Wiley, 2007

Not only do Apo-E4 alleles, which are carried on chromosome 19, increase the risk of Alzheimer disease, they advance, by as much as 20 years, the appearance of the first symptoms of the illness.

“Kaufman's Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists E-Book” by David Myland Kaufman, Mark J Milstein
from Kaufman’s Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists E-Book
by David Myland Kaufman, Mark J Milstein
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Anything can happen before you’re 20 and yes Alzeihmers can happen.
    My nephew who died in 2000 at age 9 died of Alzeihmers.
    People were shocked back when we learned you could get cancer as early as a newborn

  • I heard that thinkers who think alot are less likely to lose their memory. I hope that is true, I think too much, it would be nice to think there is a benefit for that.

    I wonder if I could remember that I rather be dead.

    Nurse, can you please remind me that I want to die if I lose my memory.

  • My grandmother died from Alzheimer’s last week and it really got me thinking. She had 7 children, 5 daughters which also includes my mother and 2 sons. None of them seem to be currently affected by anything resembling this cruel disease, no memory loss or item misplacement, etc. The problem is, I’m currently 26 years old and sometimes I tend to forget certain things, like where I’ve placed my phone or car keys. Seeing how my older relatives are not currently affected, all I can do is pray to God that this isn’t genetic. Curiously though, I have no problem in remembering other details such as people’s birthdays but still, it scares the crap out of me thinking I might carry this despicable gene. Maybe I’m looking too much into this since this is a common theme to most people but I sincerely hope we can find a cure in the next decades.

  • I’m scared. I’m just 18 and I know my actions are showing positive sign of Alzheimer’s. Memory lost even of the recent events, my body movements are being a lil off as what I’ve observed, my understanding is starting to get harder and even writing this comment is making me think hard for the correct words.

    I wouldn’t have minded these things but once, my mom took me to a doctor for check up and both of them didn’t want to tell me what is wrong with me.

    A few days later mom said I should take care of myself. Then she finally mention that it’s in my brain and the doctor said he don’t wanna reveal cuz I might get scared shitless.

  • I heard that if you keep using your brain…Like doing crosswords, sudoku, or any other mental challenge regularly will help prevent Alzheimer’s.

  • On my mother’s side of the family, my grandmother and eldest sister died of Alzheimer’s. My mother has been showing symptoms of the disease since she was in her 40s. She’s now 72 and is getting worse and yet she denies it’s happening and my father is also in denial. Every time I point out the facts and connect the symptoms my family pushes me away. She can’t get a CAT or MRI scan to check for plaques cause she can’t lay down on the table due to her weakened lungs cause of Empazema. I have yet to be tested for the disease, however, my neurosurgeon has confirmed by MRI scans that I am a perfect candidate for the disease due to the stroke I had as a newborn and the micro-seizures I’ve already had making the damaged area worse. However, my hippocampous is so far not effected and is in healthy size. I had for a few years suspected a protein defect, but didn’t think it of it started in the bone marrow. I’ll add this all to my ongoing research.

  • This is why I’m so terrified. I forgot my purse at an Aldi’s, and that was shocking. I constantly lose,my,phone in the house and have to ask at least twice what I needed to do. This is probably,why I,suck at college stuff.

  • Why worry about something you cannot control? Besides, by the time I am old enough to where I am at risk or even in the early stages, there will likely be either a cure or much more effective treatment that could reverse or halt cognitive degeneration.

  • To my knowledge, animals don’t get dementia, at least unless they are very old. Most animals stay alert until they die. Nor do they go through the physical decline as seen in many who have Alzheimers, one form of dementia. When I realize this, that our cats, dogs and birds are NOT wandering around not knowing what they are doing, I am forced to look at what people do that animals don’t, that could show us the difference. I am thinking about our food supply, as we eat fruits and vegetables sprayed with toxins. Dogs and cats are carnivorous, eating mostly meat/fish/eggs/milk. I also wonder about products we use on our bodies that animals do not use. And about medications as well. It seems there are neurotoxins at work here. I would love to see some research on those patients who get Alzheimers in terms of diet, use of products, environmental chemicals, etc. We didn’t see this years ago. Alzheimer’s was unknown. So something has been introduced into our environment that wasn’t here before, and we need to find out what it is. We also need to identify those countries that have it and don’t have it, and see what the difference is. I think they are missing the boat by doing all this research into what the brain is doing. We need to look outside the body to find out what is wrong, as I think it is environmental.

  • I sometimes forget entire important big conversations that may have been going on for hours. I’ll forget important events that have just happened yesterday. The whole memory will be gone from my brain. People will have to remind me what has happened and hope that I remember. I don’t always remember what’s happened and other times it’ll all come back to me. I’m only 17 years old. I’m young and my memory is going already at such a fast rate. It’s super scary and I don’t know why this is happening or what’s going to happen.