Air Pollutants Could Make Allergic reactions Worse

 

Pollution and Its Affects on Asthma and Allergies

Video taken from the channel: HCPLive


 

Indoor pollutants can make allergies worse

Video taken from the channel: KSAT 12


 

Achoo! When Pollen and Air Pollution Combine

Video taken from the channel: dailyRx


 

UBC Study Links Pollution to Allergies

Video taken from the channel: Citytv


 

House Dust Allergens & Indoor Air Quality

Video taken from the channel: Paul Cochrane


 

COPD Indoor Allergens & Pollutants

Video taken from the channel: Paul Cochrane


 

Air pollutants could boost potency of common airborne allergens

Video taken from the channel: American Chemical Society


SUNDAY, March 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) Certain air pollutants may boost the potency of a birch tree pollen that plays a big role in seasonal allergies, researchers say. In laboratory tests and computer simulations, researchers found that two pollutants ozone and nitrogen dioxide have a significant effect on the pollen, called Bet v 1. Air Pollution and Climate Change Can Make Your Allergies Worse 24th July 2019 0 Here is a basic theory behind air pollution and climate change.

When we burn fossil fuels like coal and natural gas, we release tons of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). An increase in air pollution may well exacerbate these existing inequalities even further. Making things worse, over the past decade, rising temperatures fueled by carbon dioxide have caused pollen. In the spring months, these allergens are made worse by the presence of increased pollen, which is one of the biggest exacerbators for allergy symptoms.

When your HVAC system does not undergo routine maintenance, it has no way of filtering allergens out. The combined effect of pollutants is to make allergens more powerful. Researchers found that ozone sets off a chain of chemical reactions that changes its protein structure. The altered allergen is then more likely to bond with nitrogen dioxide, which exacerbates immune response because it is especially irritating to the immune system.

Whether the air pollution is outdoors or indoors, if you have airborne allergies (allergies from things you breathe in), any exposure to pollutants can make them worse. Breathing in the pollutants can irritate your airways, making you wheeze and cough, but allergies from air pollution can show up in. Biological contamination can cause allergic reactions, including hypersensitivity pneumonitis, allergic rhinitis, and asthma. In large buildings, toxins released by. Air pollution is worst on hot summer days.

Ozone and smog can be a serious trigger for people with allergic asthma. The change of seasons also has a big effect on allergies. The combination of gaseous and particulate pollutants in wildfire smoke makes it especially difficult to deal with. The effects of inhaling particles are significantly worse if you suffer from asthma or allergies.

Taking the proper steps to minimize your exposure to wildfire smoke can reduce the overall health effects on you and your family. Tobacco smoke is by far the worst and most important air pollutant and it clearly promotes both allergy and asthma. Diesel fumes likely promote allergy, whereas other outdoor air pollutants act more as irritants that can aggravate allergies and asthma, rather than as true promoters of allergy or asthma.

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List of related literature:

It is assumed that air pollution alone does not affect the subjects, but in combination with allergens may swing them into an atopic state.

“Fundamentals of Toxicologic Pathology” by Matthew A. Wallig, Wanda M. Haschek, Colin G. Rousseaux
from Fundamentals of Toxicologic Pathology
by Matthew A. Wallig, Wanda M. Haschek, Colin G. Rousseaux
Elsevier Science, 2009

Groups that may be particularly susceptible to effects of indoor air contaminants include allergic or asthmatic individuals, people with respiratory disease, people whose immune systems are suppressed due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, disease, or other causes, contact lens wearers.

“Handbook of Air Pollution Prevention and Control” by Nicholas P Cheremisinoff
from Handbook of Air Pollution Prevention and Control
by Nicholas P Cheremisinoff
Elsevier Science, 2002

Some studies, including a recent birth cohort study,61 have also suggested that air pollution may cause new onset of asthma and allergic disease.

“Women and Health” by Marlene B. Goldman, Rebecca Troisi, Kathryn M. Rexrode
from Women and Health
by Marlene B. Goldman, Rebecca Troisi, Kathryn M. Rexrode
Elsevier Science, 2012

In addition to allergen exposure, epidemiological studies suggest an association between levels of air pollutants, including ozone, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide, and symptoms or exacerbations of asthma.

“Pediatric Allergy: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Donald Y. M. Leung, Hugh Sampson, Raif Geha, Stanley J. Szefler
from Pediatric Allergy: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Donald Y. M. Leung, Hugh Sampson, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Today, the dramatic rise in allergies is due to substances that are harmful, like environmental pollutants, asbestos and smoke exhaust fumes.

“Linda Page's Healthy Healing: A Guide To Self-Healing For Everyone” by Linda Page
from Linda Page’s Healthy Healing: A Guide To Self-Healing For Everyone
by Linda Page
Healthy Healing Publications, 2004

While laboratory studies indicate that transport-related air pollution may increase the risk of developing an allergy and can exacerbate symptoms, particularly in susceptible subgroups, the evidence from population studies that supports this conclusion is inconsistent.

“Health Effects of Transport-related Air Pollution” by Michal Krzyzanowski, Birgit Kuna-Dibbert, World Health Organization, Jürgen Schneider, World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe
from Health Effects of Transport-related Air Pollution
by Michal Krzyzanowski, Birgit Kuna-Dibbert, et. al.
World Health Organization Europe, 2005

Air pollution also makes asthma worse,

“The Allergy Solution” by Leo Galland, M.D., Jonathan Galland
from The Allergy Solution
by Leo Galland, M.D., Jonathan Galland
Hay House, 2016

Environmental triggers that can cause rhinitis include temperature or weather changes, cold exposure, particulates in the air, ozone, glues, paints, and cleaners.

“Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine” by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
from Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine
by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
SAGE Publications, 2010

Some studies, including a birth cohort study (Brauer et al. 2007), have also suggested that air pollution may cause new onset of asthma and allergic disease.

“Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health” by Roger Detels, Martin Gulliford, Quarraisha Abdool Karim, Chorh Chuan Tan
from Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health
by Roger Detels, Martin Gulliford, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2017

Some children may be particularly susceptible to common air pollutants (e.g., ETS, ozone, diesel exhaust) such that these exposures might not only make existing asthma worse, but they may also have a causal role.

“Pediatric Respiratory Medicine E-Book” by Lynn M. Taussig, Louis I. Landau
from Pediatric Respiratory Medicine E-Book
by Lynn M. Taussig, Louis I. Landau
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • Thanks for sharing this important information about indoor triggers that can impact COPD. To learn more about ways to cut down on indoor pollutants, this article is helpful: https://www.sandiegohomecaregivers.com/clean-indoor-air-benefits-copd/

  • So I guess I need to build a home out of glass and stone only…no furniture or carpet…no neighbors for miles and heat only with solar….

  • Great video, it is great to see that allergies can be avoided through precautions like those taken in this video. Dust can form in so many places and it can aggravate so many conditions…