Affordable Care Act Brought to increase in Cancer Of The Breast Screening

 

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The worry is what could happen if the Affordable Care Act rule is repealed, said lead researcher Dr. Amal Trivedi, an associate professor of medicine at Brown University in Providence, R.I. “Our study suggests that if the cost-sharing provisions are repealed and health plans reinstate copayments for screening mammograms, fewer older women will receive recommended breast cancer screening. THURSDAY, Jan. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News)—More American women started getting recommended mammography screening after an “Obamacare” rule made the tests free, a new study finds. Affordable Care Act Led to Rise in Breast Cancer Screening | HealthyWomen.

That’s why the Affordable Care Act makes breast cancer screening and counseling free. All health plans * must cover these benefits at no cost to you. More than 40,000 women die from breast cancer. How the ACA impacted breast cancer screening at a safety net hospital Implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) did not make a significant impact on breast cancer care at a safety net hospital in California, according to findings published in the American Journal of Surgery. The Affordable Care Act: Increasing Access to Screening The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is helping to improve insurance coverage and reduce costs of breast cancer screenings.

We found that incidence of early-stage breast and colorectal cancer increased after the adoption of the ACA, whereas it did not vary for late-stage cancer. Although screening itself was not assessed, the trend is consistent with modest but immediate increases in colorectal and breast cancer screening following the ACA. Following the expansion of Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act, individuals with low income are less likely to be diagnosed with advanced cancer, according to a study published in CANCER.

The passage of the Affordable Care Act expanded Medicaid coverage for most American adults with incomes up to 138% of the federal poverty level. When the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), or Obamacare, was signed into law on March 23, 2010, it was a historic moment — in fact, it was the biggest change to US health care since Medicare and Medicaid were launched in 1965. Over the past 10 years, the ACA has lowered the number of uninsured people living in the US, including people with pre.

We estimated that the ACA resulted in an increase of 8,400 (8 percent) diagnoses of early-stage colorectal cancer among US seniors in the period 2011-13. However, the ACA had no distinguishable effect on the number of diagnoses of early-stage breast cancer. Chronic diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, are responsible for 7 of 10 deaths among Americans each year and account for 75 % of the nation’s health spending – and often are preventable.

The Affordable Care Act – the health insurance reform legislation passed by Congress and signed into law by President Obama on March 23 – will help make prevention affordable.

List of related literature:

Advocates of mammography for women aged forty to forty-nine, including many politicians and radiologists, defended screening by arguing that it reduced mortality from breast cancer by 16 to 18 percent, at least half as much as did screening older women.

“The Breast Cancer Wars: Hope, Fear, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America” by Barron H. Lerner
from The Breast Cancer Wars: Hope, Fear, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America
by Barron H. Lerner
Oxford University Press, 2001

In the first trial of screening for breast cancer, some 62 000 women aged 40–64 in a health maintenance organization in New York were randomized into two equally sized groups: one group was offered the new screening intervention, mammography.

“Critical Appraisal of Epidemiological Studies and Clinical Trials” by Mark Elwood
from Critical Appraisal of Epidemiological Studies and Clinical Trials
by Mark Elwood
Oxford University Press, 2017

Preventive health care, 2001 update: screening mammography among women aged 40–49 years at average risk of breast cancer.

“Oxford Textbook of Primary Medical Care” by Roger Jones (Prof.)
from Oxford Textbook of Primary Medical Care
by Roger Jones (Prof.)
Oxford University Press, 2005

The research focus on screening interventions mirrors the unique legislative history of breast cancer care.

“Race, Ethnicity, and Health: A Public Health Reader” by Thomas A. LaVeist, Lydia A. Isaac
from Race, Ethnicity, and Health: A Public Health Reader
by Thomas A. LaVeist, Lydia A. Isaac
Wiley, 2012

This issue came to a head in 1993, when the National Cancer Institute in the USA assessed the available randomized trial evidence on breast cancer screening in women under age 50, concluded that the benefits were uncertain, and changed its previous recommendation which supported screening in this age group.

“Critical Appraisal of Epidemiological Studies and Clinical Trials” by J. Mark Elwood
from Critical Appraisal of Epidemiological Studies and Clinical Trials
by J. Mark Elwood
Oxford University Press, 2007

Breast cancer screening cost study.

“Applied Methods of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Health Care” by Emma McIntosh, Philip Clarke, Emma Frew, Jordan Louviere
from Applied Methods of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Health Care
by Emma McIntosh, Philip Clarke, et. al.
OUP Oxford, 2010

The new recommendations were intended to improve the efficacy of screening and to lower unnecessary biopsies and distress for women at average risk for breast cancer; instead, they created enormous controversy.

“Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning” by José Antonio Bowen
from Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning
by José Antonio Bowen
Wiley, 2012

Shortly thereafter, the American Cancer Society appointed a panel of experts chosen because each already believed that screening was valuable for 40to 50-year-old women.

“The Oxford Handbook of Health Psychology” by Howard S. Friedman
from The Oxford Handbook of Health Psychology
by Howard S. Friedman
Oxford University Press, 2011

Screening for breast cancer: recommendations and rationale.

“Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.” by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
from Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.
by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, 2010

The benefits and harms of breast cancer screening: an independent review.

“Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals” by Penny Webb, Chris Bain, Andrew Page
from Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals
by Penny Webb, Chris Bain, Andrew Page
Cambridge University Press, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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