Advantages of Weight Training While You Age

 

The New Fountain of Youth Strength Training for Seniors

Video taken from the channel: Barbell Logic


 

The Benefits of Strength Training As You Age

Video taken from the channel: Wild Warrior Train for Longevity


 

Strength Training for Longevity | Skyler Tanner M.S.

Video taken from the channel: 21 Studios


 

Doug McGuff-Strength Training for Health and Longevity

Video taken from the channel: TheIHMC


 

The benefits of strength training as we age

Video taken from the channel: Millar Fit


 

Benefits of strength training for women: Mayo Clinic Radio

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Muscle matters: Dr Brendan Egan at TEDxUCD

Video taken from the channel: TEDx Talks


The Importance of Strength Training as You Age 1. Bone Density One of the most talked-about reasons for strength training in women is the prevention of osteoporosis. 2. Aesthetics Another benefit is aesthetics. Generally, we gain about 10 pounds of body weight every decade during 3. Testosterone. Strength Training for Older Adults Studies of people in their nineties have shown the benefits of strength training by measurable gains in strength through resistance training.

If you have been away from strength training for a long time, or just a beginner, you can begin to reap the benefits at any age. One of the biggest benefits of strength training for seniors is quite basic: being in better shape can automatically help you manage your health. Keeping your body fat lower and your percentage of muscle mass higher can help you avoid or minimize the side effects of various common ailments people tend to experience as they age.

Strength training can help you build muscle, make you strong, increase your endurance and make everyday activities easier. By combining strength and power training exercises you’ll not only get stronger, you’ll build speed and improve your reaction time. That’s critical as you age, because it can help prevent falls. Two or three 20or 30-minute strength training sessions every week can result in significant health benefits: Increased muscle mass: Muscle mass naturally decreases with age, but strength training can help reverse the trend. Stronger bone.

You bet! Done properly, it offers many benefits to young athletes. Strength training is even a good idea for kids who simply want to look and feel better.

In fact, this form of exercise might put your child on a lifetime path to better health and fitness. The benefits of strength training for older adults Aging is associated with a number of physiologic and functional declines that can contribute to increased disability, frailty, and falls. Contributing factors are the loss of muscle mass and strength as age increases, a phenomenon called sarcopenia. But you can regain some control in a number of ways — and improving your strength is one of them.

Muscle strength is important for bone health, balance and just being strong enough for daily. One of strength training’s many benefits include a longer life. The 2015 study in The Lancet found that grip strength accurately predicts death from.

As we age, strength training helps to preserve mobility and reduce the risk of falling. “What has been shown is that if you’re looking at mobility problems, the most beneficial exercises are those that focus on progressive training for strength and power.” And, how much muscle do you lose as you age? Check out the graph below.

List of related literature:

Advantages of strength and balance training among older adults are that it plays a significant role in improving neural recruitment patterns resulting in strength gain.

“International Encyclopedia of Ergonomics and Human Factors, Second Edition 3 Volume Set” by Waldemar Karwowski
from International Encyclopedia of Ergonomics and Human Factors, Second Edition 3 Volume Set
by Waldemar Karwowski
Taylor & Francis, 2006

The concept of resistance training in older adults is not unlike that in younger adults: providing muscles with an overload stimulus will lead to an improvement in the muscle’s force-producing capability, thus helping to mitigate sarcopenia.

“Geriatric Physical Therapy eBook” by Andrew A. Guccione, Dale Avers, Rita Wong
from Geriatric Physical Therapy eBook
by Andrew A. Guccione, Dale Avers, Rita Wong
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Strength gains increase with age to maturity and then decline in middle adulthood.

“Functional Movement Development Across the Life Span E-Book” by Donna J. Cech, Suzanne Tink Martin
from Functional Movement Development Across the Life Span E-Book
by Donna J. Cech, Suzanne Tink Martin
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Therefore, strength training is currently recommended as one component of an active lifestyle aimed at countering sarcopenia, reducing health risks, and improving quality of life in older adults (ACSM 1998).

“Human Body Composition” by Steven Heymsfield, Timothy Lohman, ZiMian Wang, Scott B. Going
from Human Body Composition
by Steven Heymsfield, Timothy Lohman, et. al.
Human Kinetics, 2005

The basic resistance-training program recommended for health and fitness by the ACSM for healthy adults is an effective starting point for adults over 60.When the goal is increasing muscular strength and hypertrophy, evidence supports the use of variation in the resistance-training program.

“Physical Activity Instruction of Older Adults” by C. Jessie Jones, Debra J. Rose
from Physical Activity Instruction of Older Adults
by C. Jessie Jones, Debra J. Rose
Human Kinetics, 2005

Strength training also aids in the development of the skeletal system, improves bone-mineral content, adds muscle mass, enhances glucose metabolism, reduces coronary-disease risk factors, and helps manage lower back pain, diabetes, and geriatric fragility.

“Physical Fitness and Wellness: Changing the Way You Look, Feel, and Perform” by Jerrold S. Greenberg, George B. Dintiman, Barbee Myers Oakes
from Physical Fitness and Wellness: Changing the Way You Look, Feel, and Perform
by Jerrold S. Greenberg, George B. Dintiman, Barbee Myers Oakes
Human Kinetics, 2004

Resistance training (e.g., weight lifting) and balance training also have important health benefits in older adults.

“Assisted Living Nursing: A Manual for Management and Practice” by Dr. Ethel Mitty, EdD, RN, Dr. Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Sandra Flores, RN
from Assisted Living Nursing: A Manual for Management and Practice
by Dr. Ethel Mitty, EdD, RN, Dr. Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Sandra Flores, RN
Springer Publishing Company, 2009

When the older adult’s long-term resistance training goal is progression toward higher levels of muscular strength and hypertrophy, evidence supports the use of variation in the resistance training program.

“Science and Practice of Strength Training” by Vladimir M. Zatsiorsky, William J. Kraemer, Andrew C. Fry
from Science and Practice of Strength Training
by Vladimir M. Zatsiorsky, William J. Kraemer, Andrew C. Fry
Human Kinetics, 2020

Furthermore, strength training will not negatively affect growth or maturation during childhood and adolescence.

“Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine” by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
from Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine
by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
SAGE Publications, 2010

Strength training in the elderly: effects on risk factors for age-related diseases.

“Geriatric Gastroenterology” by C. S. Pitchumoni, T. Dharmarajan
from Geriatric Gastroenterology
by C. S. Pitchumoni, T. Dharmarajan
Springer New York, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

1 comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Great comment on orthopedic PT/re-hab. at the end. Having had 3 major surgeries (Lt. ACL, Rt. TKR, and Rt. Ankle micro-fracture, removed bone fragments and repaired torn ligaments, etc) in the last 3 yrs. I employed BBS style work which impressed all of the therapists I had, and the results were fantastic. Once I explained it to each therapist, they were very supportive. If you have not tried the BBS workout, check into it and read the book so you understand why and how. The why is as, if not more important, than the how. Once you understand the science behind the concepts, you will be more effective with the program.
    The BBS book also gets into the ‘Paleo’ diet which isn’t necessary and IMO doesn’t really belong in the book. I general, much of what is discussed in the ‘Paleo lit. is pretty decent. However, the Diet itself has been largely debunked, but that is a whole ‘nother topic.