Ads For Brief-Term Plans Missing ACA Protections Swamped Consumers’ Online Searches

 

Big ACA Short-Term Changes Coming 2019 Part 1

Video taken from the channel: Gordon Marketing


 

How Big is your Digital Footprint and Why Should you Care? Marcus Rogers

Video taken from the channel: Dawn or Doom Purdue University


 

Protecting Your Online Privacy | Consumer Reports

Video taken from the channel: Consumer Reports


 

How Targeted Ads Work | Consumer Reports

Video taken from the channel: Consumer Reports


 

HR Basics: Affordable Care Act

Video taken from the channel: Gregg Learning


 

What happens if the Affordable Care Act is eliminated during a pandemic?

Video taken from the channel: PBS NewsHour


 

Affordable Care Act

Video taken from the channel: Professor Leckrone


Consumers shopping for insurance online last fall — using search terms such as “Obamacare plans,” “ACA enroll” and “cheap health insurance” — were most often directed to websites that promote. Consumers shopping for insurance online last fall — using search terms such as “Obamacare plans,” “ACA enroll” and “cheap health insurance” — were most often directed to websites that promote individual health plans that didn’t meet consumer protections of the Affordable Care Act, according to a new study. Consumers shopping for insurance online last fall — using search terms such as “Obamacare plans,” “ACA enroll” and “cheap health insurance” — were most often directed to websites that. Consumers shopping for insurance online last fall — using search terms such as “Obamacare plans,” “ACA enroll” and “cheap health insurance” — were most often directed to websites that promote individual health plans that didn’t meet consumer protections of the Affordable Care Act, according to a new study. Consumers shopping for insurance online last fall — using search terms such as “Obamacare plans,” “ACA enroll” and “cheap health insurance” — were most often directed to websites that promote individual health plans that didn’t meet consumer protections of the Affordable Care Act, according to a new study.

Consumers’ online searches for ACA plans led more often to short-term plans A study of online marketing tactics found that regardless of the search term used, companies promoting short-term plans. Ads For Short-Term Plans Lacking ACA Protections Swamped Consumers’ Online Searches By Steven Findlay January 31, 2019 KHN Original People looking for insurance during the recent open enrollment. Consumers who used the terms “ACA enroll,” “Obamacare plans,” and “cheap health insurance” to shop online for insurance last fall were often drawn to websites that promote short-term health plans or other non-Affordable Care Act-compliant plans, according to a study by researchers at Georgetown University’s Center on Health Insurance Reforms. The health reform law did many other things besides mandate the creation of state health insurance exchanges – also known as health insurance marketplaces.

There were some important consumer protections that will give people buying insurance a little more assurance they may be treated fairly in the marketplace. Ads for short-term plans lacking ACA protections swamped consumers’ online searches (Kaiser Health News) Teva’s generic EpiPen launch stalls months after approval ( Reuters ) State by state.

List of related literature:

Another way to weaken ACA marketplaces is to make it more difficult to enroll in marketplace plans.

“Essentials of Health Policy and Law” by Sara E. Wilensky, Joel B. Teitelbaum
from Essentials of Health Policy and Law
by Sara E. Wilensky, Joel B. Teitelbaum
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Prior to January 2014, plans may only impose annual limits on coverage as determined by the Secretary.

“Jonas and Kovner's Health Care Delivery in the United States, Tenth Edition” by Anthony R. Kovner, PhD, James R. Knickman, PhD, Victoria D. Weisfeld, MPH
from Jonas and Kovner’s Health Care Delivery in the United States, Tenth Edition
by Anthony R. Kovner, PhD, James R. Knickman, PhD, Victoria D. Weisfeld, MPH
Springer Publishing Company, 2011

(The plan requires that businesses with more than 50 employees offer insurance, creates health exchanges to buy private insurance at more affordable prices, and expands access to Medicaid for low-income citizens.)

“Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities” by Jill Yamasaki, Patricia Geist-Martin, Barbara F. Sharf
from Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities
by Jill Yamasaki, Patricia Geist-Martin, Barbara F. Sharf
Waveland Press, 2016

Rather than denounce reform outright, these ads questioned government involvement in the health care system.

“One Nation, Uninsured: Why the U.S. Has No National Health Insurance” by Jill Quadagno
from One Nation, Uninsured: Why the U.S. Has No National Health Insurance
by Jill Quadagno
Oxford University Press, 2006

The tag line for the ad was, “There’s got to be a better way.”18 Similarly, before the 2016 elections, many Republicans promised to “repeal and replace” the health reform bill without specifying their favored replacement option.

“Essentials of Health Policy and Law” by Joel B. Teitelbaum, Sara E. Wilensky
from Essentials of Health Policy and Law
by Joel B. Teitelbaum, Sara E. Wilensky
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Once again, the ACA attempts to change these choices and incentives.

“Essentials of Health Policy and Law” by Joel Bern Teitelbaum, Sara E. Wilensky
from Essentials of Health Policy and Law
by Joel Bern Teitelbaum, Sara E. Wilensky
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2013

These Republican proposals allowed states to opt out of this regulation if and only if they have another, working means of providing affordable coverage to those with preexisting conditions.

“The New American Revolution: The Making of a Populist Movement” by Kayleigh McEnany
from The New American Revolution: The Making of a Populist Movement
by Kayleigh McEnany
Threshold Editions, 2019

Even after PPACA, some insurers design benefits in a way that discourages enrollment by people with major health needs.

“Complete Guide to Human Resources and the Law, 2019 Edition” by Shilling
from Complete Guide to Human Resources and the Law, 2019 Edition
by Shilling
Wolters Kluwer Law & Business, 2018

Another strategy by health insurers was recently suggested: using Part D coverage as a “hook” to enroll seniors in managed care plans (Gleckman 2006).

“Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy” by Stuart O. Schweitzer
from Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy
by Stuart O. Schweitzer
Oxford University Press, USA, 2007

And, apart from antitrust law, the new ACA prohibits any health plan (including self-insured employers) from “discriminating” against any category of licensed health care provider.

“Health Care Law and Ethics” by Mark A. Hall, David Orentlicher, Mary Anne Bobinski, Nicholas Bagley, I. Glenn Cohen
from Health Care Law and Ethics
by Mark A. Hall, David Orentlicher, et. al.
Wolters Kluwer, 2018

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Are targeted ads really so bad? Whether you get targeted ads or other ads you’re going to get ads regardless. So why not have ads about things that you might be interested in.

  • Just watched a video of the Abbey Road Medley, and then I see an ad for HP computers with Beatles music in the background. I see what you’re up to, YouTube.