5 Ways Parents Supports Their College-Age Children Who Had Been Made to Go Back Home Because of COVID-19

 

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Editor’s Note: With many college students forced to return home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, tensions and arguments are bound to flare up. Here, Matthew Mayhew, an education researcher who co-authored a book about the college experience and its effect on students, offers five things parents and families of the many college students who are. 5 ways parents can support their college-age children who’ve been forced to return home due to COVID-19 Matthew J. Mayhew, The Ohio State University Saturday. With many college students forced to return home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, tensions and arguments are bound to flare up.Here, Matthew Mayhew, an education researcher who co-authored a book about the college experience and its effect on students, offers five things parents and families of the many college students who are now learning from home should consider. 5 ways parents can support their college-age children home due to COVID-19 With many college students forced to return home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, tensions and arguments are.

Editor’s Note: With many college students forced to return home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, tensions and arguments are bound to flare up. Here, Matthew Mayhew, an education researcher who co-authored a book about the college experience and its effect on students, offers five things parents and families of the many college students who are now learning from home should consider. 5 ways parents can support their college-age children who’ve been forced to return home due to COVID-19 Share: as they try to complete the semester in unexpected ways. Also, many students might be questioning their decisions to go to college in the first place.

Or what school will be like when they return. In the months since the pandemic began, more than 338,000 children have been diagnosed with COVID-19. That means that just two weeks in July accounted for almost a third of all the cases in.

COVID-19 will have a major impact on how we practice psychiatry in the future. If your student’s college is discontinuing care, the school provider or case manager should be. Cases of COVID-19 are on the rise in several U.S. states, which has many wondering if there’s any possible way for kids to return to school and day care safely. A lot of parents are also feeling stressed about how to manage child care so they can continue to work or return to work when day cares and schools haven’t yet reopened.

RELATED: 5 ways parents can support their college-age children who’ve been forced to return home due to COVID-19 Continue Reading Show full articles without “Continue Reading” button for {0} hours.

List of related literature:

Over two-thirds of these parents indicated that the primary disadvantage of the LDC lifestyle was coping alone effectively as a single parent while their partner is away, noting that the increased responsibilities in parenting and household management led to feeling stressed and burdened by the additional demands.

“Handbook of Parenting and Child Development Across the Lifespan” by Matthew R. Sanders, Alina Morawska
from Handbook of Parenting and Child Development Across the Lifespan
by Matthew R. Sanders, Alina Morawska
Springer International Publishing, 2018

Ask them to consider social factors and social changes that might interfere with, or influence, these plans (e.g., education provided over the internet for children at home, workplace policies that encourage caregiving for older family members, changing norms about grown children leaving their parents’ home by age 21).

“Aging, Society and the Life Course” by Leslie A. Morgan, Suzanne Kunkel, Suzanne R. Kunkel
from Aging, Society and the Life Course
by Leslie A. Morgan, Suzanne Kunkel, Suzanne R. Kunkel
Springer, 2007

Other reasons that may contribute to young adults returning home include economic ones: poorly paid employment, high cost of housing, and the tradeoff between the child’s loss of privacy and the ability to save money while living with parents.

“Encyclopedia of Social Problems” by Vincent N. Parrillo
from Encyclopedia of Social Problems
by Vincent N. Parrillo
SAGE Publications, 2008

The main sources of conflict between adolescents and their parents are the following (Teperoglou et al. 1999): (a) use of free time—entertainment, frequency and duration of the time spent out of home; (b) participation in housework; (c) spendingof money;and (d) watching of TV programs.

“International encyclopedia of adolescence: A-J, index” by Jeffrey Jensen Arnett
from International encyclopedia of adolescence: A-J, index
by Jeffrey Jensen Arnett
Routledge/Taylor & Francis, 2007

With changing family demographics that include more single-parent homes and more homes with both parents working outside the home, many older students must hurry home to care for younger siblings.

“Physical Education for Lifelong Fitness: The Physical Best Teacher's Guide” by Physical Best (Program), Suzan F. Ayers, National Association for Sport and Physical Education, Mary Jo Sariscsany
from Physical Education for Lifelong Fitness: The Physical Best Teacher’s Guide
by Physical Best (Program), Suzan F. Ayers, et. al.
Human Kinetics, 2011

Returning to live with parents after a period of independent living is also common.

“Encyclopedia of Human Relationships: Vol. 1-” by Harry T. Reis, Susan Sprecher
from Encyclopedia of Human Relationships: Vol. 1-
by Harry T. Reis, Susan Sprecher
SAGE Publications, 2009

Family leave policies that provide income replacement and incentives for parents to take leave can help alleviate the stress of parenting.

“Community Health and Wellness: Primary Health Care in Practice” by Anne McMurray, Jill Clendon
from Community Health and Wellness: Primary Health Care in Practice
by Anne McMurray, Jill Clendon
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

For example, young people leave home to establish an independent residence only to return home again at a subsequent time; move between school and work, and drop out of college for the labor force, only to return to school to acquire additional educational credentials.

“Handbook of Life-Span Development” by Lawerence K.W. Berg, PhD, Esq., Karen L. Fingerman, PhD, Toni C. Antonucci, PhD, Jacqui Smith, PhD, Cynthia Berg, PhD
from Handbook of Life-Span Development
by Lawerence K.W. Berg, PhD, Esq., Karen L. Fingerman, PhD, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2010

It is crucial for parents to be open to their adult child’s decisions, such as finding a place to live, entering the military, choosing a college or training for a career, entering the workforce, choosing a mate, taking a trip, and so on.

“The Family: A Christian Perspective on the Contemporary Home” by Jack O. Balswick, Judith K. Balswick
from The Family: A Christian Perspective on the Contemporary Home
by Jack O. Balswick, Judith K. Balswick
Baker Publishing Group, 2007

Finally, from the HSB study and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, McLanahan and Sandefur (1994) found that children from single-parent families indicated that their parents had lower expectations for them to attend or graduate from college than did children from two-parent families.

“Close Relationships: A Sourcebook” by Clyde Hendrick, Susan S. Hendrick, Susan Hendrick
from Close Relationships: A Sourcebook
by Clyde Hendrick, Susan S. Hendrick, Susan Hendrick
SAGE Publications, 2000

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Once again Dr O for the tireless efforts you make in order to save lives… Seems like America is driving down this road and ignores the sign “Caution Ahead”….n now we’re ignoring the sign which now reads “Danger road ahead out” and we keep driving and pushing the country over the cliff! The next 6 months will be interesting.

  • I’m not sure why Mr. Osterholm did not mention this, but they are already making the vaccines. That is part of Operation Warp Speed, the president will not have to tell companies to make them, they are literally making them right now, in case one does get approved. I’m assuming Mr. Osterholm already knew that, at least I hope he did.

  • Thank you Dr. Osterholm! Please don’t change a thing! Everything is perfect especially your kind heart! Love your dedications and your ending songs. Looking forward week after week since the beginning to be educated with straightforward information.

  • We all have phones and the internet, so there’s no reason to feel lonely. No reason why people have to hide, either, when wearing a face mask allows us to go into public places safely.

    Most likely the main reason for people being depressed is a financial one. If you can’t make ends meet, that’s the real mental stress. I almost went crazy in 2008, worrying about paying my bills or if I would lose my house. That scared me so much that I saved every penny I could after the economy picked up and changed my way of life so that I could live within my means and be financially secure. By not spending on anything except what I absolutely needed, I now have enough savings to weather this financial storm.

  • I have studied in IITs, in the best of North American universities, and must say that there is hardly any bias against women in academia. Women enjoy all the benefits, advantages equally as do men. As a society, while should ensure equality of opportunity, we should NEVER ensure equality of outcome/success. Just because women are less successful (which I do not agree, I think there are many many accomplished women in STEM) that need not necessarily indicate that women scientists are less valued! For example, the problems raised by Rubica has nothing to do with opportunities in academia but the poor transportation facilities in India.

    Professors secure research funding for doing research, the money given by the government/industry does not come for free! If the PI does not deliver the funding agencies stop the flow of money! Just crying on the web does not help the PI! Most importantly, these problems are faced by both the genders, PI’s do not have any vested interests in deregistering PDFs.

  • Your dedications are lovely & show kindness & humanity. Thank you for your openness & honesty throughout this Global Pandemic. I am located in New Zealand & have been sharing all your updates with friends in the US since the Joe Rogan podcast 6 months ago. A rare clear voice amongst the madness of misinformation in the US. Thank you & all your team.

  • Dear Mike, my husband takes a commuter bus daily to NYC. There are around 3 to 5 people on the bus on the way home. I think he said there are about 20 people on the bus in the morning on the 5am run. It is a 100 mile round trip commute from NJ. He does wear an N95 mask with another mask on top of it as it has a valve, he got a supply of them from his construction site in March. So far he hasn’t gotten sick. He was tested 3 times, once right before his colonoscopy, he was negative each time. I am getting nervous now that schools are opening and the Governor of NY is opening the restaurants for indoor dining at the end of September. My husband is almost 62 years old so we are understandably worried about him getting Covid. He doesn’t want to retire as he likes working so he is wearing the N95 mask and social distancing as best as he can. I hope there is a vaccine available soon…

  • Approximate pandemic start date: 01-Dec-19
    Days of pandemic 286

    World population: 7,811,202,000
    Total Infections: 28,607,382
    Total % of World’s population infected at some time: 0.37%
    Average days each individual actively infected: 14
    Average percent of the world’s population actively infected at any time during the pandemic: 0.018%

    Total deaths attributed to covid-19: 918,153
    Total % of World population dying while infected: 0.012%
    Average global daily deaths attributed to covid-19: 3210
    Average global daily deaths from all causes of death: 146,000
    Percentage of global daily deaths attributed to covid-19*: 2.20%

    Percentage of World’s population dying each day before the pandemic: 0.00187%
    Percentage of World’s population dying each day during the pandemic:*: 0.00191%
    Percentage change in daily death rate due to covid-19*: 0.00004%

    *Assumes all the people who died with covid-19 would have lived if the pandemic never happened.

  • How hard is it to fast-forward through his dedications or personal reflections if you ain’t interested? Smdh, people are even lazier than I thought.

  • Funny how he is not talking about deaths but cases. Big difference. Cases rise in Europe but deaths do not.
    Ok, listening to this he wants this to drag on.

  • YouTube “Relaxation” videos really help… even leave them on at nite [OCEAN WAVES; MINDFULNESS; MEDITATION; ANGELS; CHANTS; PRAYERS…]. I collect them!