5 Things You Must Know About Cervical Cancer

 

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Video taken from the channel: Baylor Scott & White Health


 

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However, because this cancer often comes with no early warning signs, City of Hope urges women to protect their health by learning five things about cervical cancer: 1. The most common cause is human papillomavirus (HPV). Roughly 99 percent of cervical cancers are caused by this 2. Cervical. However, because this cancer often comes with no early warning signs, City of Hope urges women to protect their health by learning five things about cervical cancer: 1. The most common cause is human papillomavirus (HPV). Roughly 99 percent of cervical cancers are caused by this 2. Cervical.

Women 30 to 64 years old should get a Pap test every five years as long as their results remain normal. 5. Warning signs of cervical cancer may be scarce. Cervical cancer may cause bleeding, but many women experience irregular periods so this may not seem unusual.

Often, the disease does not cause pain or other obvious warning signs, making screening that much more. 5 things all women should know about cervical cancer in order to prevent it: 1. The majority of cases occur due to HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) infection. 2. Cervical cancer has no symptoms unless it’s very advanced. 3. There is a vaccine against HPV virus.

4. HPV virus is sexually transmitted, so. Roughly 99 percent of cervical cancers are caused by this sexually transmitted infection. The most common strains of the virus, HPV 16 and HPV 18, are responsible for about 70 percent of all cases of the disease. Roughly 14 million new HPV infections are detected each year. 5 Things Doctors Want You To Know About Cervical Cancer HPV is responsible for nearly all cervical cancers.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common sexually transmitted virus, Cervical cancer develops from normal cells. Pre-cancerous changes are not sudden, and they can be detected by a Pap. Women 21 to 29 should get a Pap test every three years as long as their results remain normal. Women 30 to 65 years old should get a Pap test combined with an HPV test every five years as long as their results remain normal. Alternatively, women 30 and over may opt for just a Pap test every three years.

5. Warning signs of cervical cancer may be scarce. Cervical cancer may. Women 30 to 64 years old should get a Pap test every five years as long as their results remain normal. 5. Warning signs of cervical cancer may be scarce.

Cervical cancer may cause bleeding, but many women experience irregular periods so this may not seem unusual. Often, the disease does not cause pain or other obvious warning signs, making screening that much more. 5. Warning signs of cervical cancer may be scarce.

Cervical cancer may cause bleeding, but many women experience irregular periods so this may not seem unusual. Often, the disease does not cause pain or other obvious warning signs, making screening that much more important. Women who suspect a problem should not ignore their symptoms and seek a medical evaluation.

More information. The American Cancer Society has more on cervical cancer. If you’ve been diagnosed with cervical cancer, you’re sure to have a lot of questions.Maybe you just found out you have it, or maybe you’ve already been through treatments and don’t know.

List of related literature:

For 2016, the American Cancer Society estimated that 12,990 cases of invasive cervical carcinoma and approximately 4120 cervical cancer deaths would occur in the United States.1 Since 2004, rates have decreased by 2.1% per year in women younger than 50 years and by 3.1% per year in women aged 50 years and older.

“Abeloff's Clinical Oncology E-Book” by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, James H Doroshow, Michael B. Kastan, Joel E. Tepper
from Abeloff’s Clinical Oncology E-Book
by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) speculate that 50% of sexually active men and women will experience HPV infection (genital warts) during their lifetime.3 Cancer of the endometrium occurs primarily in postmenopausal women and is more common than cervical cancer.

“Berry & Kohn's Operating Room Technique E-Book” by Nancymarie Phillips
from Berry & Kohn’s Operating Room Technique E-Book
by Nancymarie Phillips
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Ovarian and Cervical Cancer Even though ovarian cancer is the sixth most common form of cancer in females, it is the leading cause of death from all gynecological malignancies (excluding breast cancer) because it is difficult to detect before it metastasizes (spreads) beyond the ovaries.

“Introduction to the Human Body” by Gerard J. Tortora, Bryan H. Derrickson
from Introduction to the Human Body
by Gerard J. Tortora, Bryan H. Derrickson
Wiley, 2017

Although 3–10% of cervical cancers occur in pregnant women, invasive carcinoma of the cervix is relatively uncommon during gestation, occurring approximately once in 2200 pregnancies.** Nevertheless, routine cervical cytology should be part of the initial prenatal examination.

“Blaustein's Pathology of the Female Genital Tract” by Robert J. Kurman
from Blaustein’s Pathology of the Female Genital Tract
by Robert J. Kurman
Springer New York, 2013

However, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer related deaths among women in developing countries (National Cervical Cancer Coalition Web site, http://www.nccconline.org/).

“The Washington Manual of Surgery” by Mary E. Klingensmith, Washington University (Saint Louis, Mo.). Dept. of Surgery
from The Washington Manual of Surgery
by Mary E. Klingensmith, Washington University (Saint Louis, Mo.). Dept. of Surgery
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

Nursing Considerations: Teach the woman that HPV vaccine is not treatment for existing genital warts or cervical, vaginal, or vulvar cancers and that regular cervical cancer screening should continue as recommended by her care provider.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing” by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing
by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women (under the age of 35 years), and in the UK approximately 2700 new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed each year, around three-quarters identified at cervical screening.

“Crash Course Obstetrics and Gynaecology” by Sophie Kay, Charlotte Jean Sandhu, Shreelata T Datta, Philip Xiu, Ruma Dutta, Fevzi Shakir
from Crash Course Obstetrics and Gynaecology
by Sophie Kay, Charlotte Jean Sandhu, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

In the United States, Pap screening has dramatically lowered the incidence of invasive cervical tumors to about 12,000 cases annually with a mortality of about 4000 per year; in fact, cervical cancer no longer ranks among the top 10 causes of cancer deaths in U.S. women.

“Robbins Basic Pathology E-Book” by Vinay Kumar, Abul K. Abbas, Jon C. Aster
from Robbins Basic Pathology E-Book
by Vinay Kumar, Abul K. Abbas, Jon C. Aster
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

(1) Cervical cancer is caused by HPV. (2) Cervical cancer is reduced in prevalence by Pap smear screening.

“Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility” by Marc A. Fritz, Leon Speroff
from Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility
by Marc A. Fritz, Leon Speroff
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011

Genital HPV infection is common in sexually active young women and persistent infection with carcinogenic HPV causes almost all cervical cancers.

“Hysterectomy: A Comprehensive Surgical Approach” by Ibrahim Alkatout, Liselotte Mettler
from Hysterectomy: A Comprehensive Surgical Approach
by Ibrahim Alkatout, Liselotte Mettler
Springer International Publishing, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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14 comments

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  • A very important point she makes, is to talk about if you nervous about a pelvic exam, or if it hurt last time. Talk to your doctor about it. The can’t read your emotions. If it’s a good doctor they’ll understand. It really changed things for me!

  • due to vaginismus sorry if i spelled it wrong, pap smears and pelvic exams are so extremely painful im 21 and still unable to do them and i thought this was normal my entire life I’ve had past doctors try to rip the stirn up through me and still couldn’t get it through.ive tried everything to make them less painful and theirs nothing even the best of nurse wasn’t able to get me to stop panicking and shaking my legs the minute i feel something entering my vagina, anyone else unable to do peliv exams and pap smears and cry when putting in tampons

  • I have definitely heard about girls talking about being shamed by their (usually male) gyno for not shaving their private areas. So you may feel that way, like you don’t care, but that’s not a universal opinion, and some girls have reason to feel nervous. Just saying. I appreciate your videos though!

  • I would rather have cancer than have a pap smear. As a rape survivor, I just go into a different mental place when that whole exam has to happen. I HATE being checked when I’m in labor. It terrifies me. And the worst thing? When they say, “Hey, is it OK if we have 20 medical students watch us stick objects into your vagina?”

    I had one delivery at a teaching hospital and they just brought 5 students in to watch the dilation checks and had a few practice. I was way too humiliated to object. I finally got the courage on my 3rd, and I get that they need the practice, but this is SO hard

  • I’ve used sumers eve wash but rarely.. And the good thing about it, I started having sex with my now fiance and when we started it threw my oh balance off and caused yeast infection and a uti.. I didn’t really notice the infection.. I had some itching but nothing major or constant. And it was when I used the ph balance wash that set my lady bits on fire and made the itching insane after. Couldn’t get the soap off quick enough. and I knew I had to go get checked.. I’ve never had any issues with it other than it help to diagnose me. Considering I hadn’t had a yeast infection since I was a little girl who would take bubble baths every night..

  • One of my friend told me to try herbal medicine to get rid of my hsv2. I tried this treatment and I got great results…So I am recommending this product to all of you guys.. you can as well reach him on email [email protected] gmail.com or WhatsApp +2348114047176…

  • One of my friend told me to try herbal medicine to get rid of my hsv2. I tried this treatment and I got great results…So I am recommending this product to all of you guys.. you can as well reach him on email [email protected] gmail.com or WhatsApp +2348114047176…

  • I’m super nervous about seeing OBGYN’s…I had a horrible experience where I went to go see a specialist who dealt specifically with some uncommon issues that I need help with. I ended up pregnant because he prescribed birth control that had been recalled…never found out if he knew or not… but when I went in for a followup as soon as I told the front desk I was pregnant he refused to see me. It was a total cluster fuck and absolutely absurdity!

  • Oh thank goodness! I never used douches, wipes etc. my OB told me “the vagina is cool, you know why? because it cleans itself” when I was a teen. I did have a yeast infection once when I was pregnant, otherwise I’ve always been healthy downstairs. Wipe front to back, see my OB, wear clean undies. I’ve never had a painful exam. I’d feel a little pressure when they put that metal thing up there for a pap but it’s not painful, maybe some pressure but that was it. I’m almost 30 years old, been there done that. To all the young girls, you’re not alone. Yes the first time is a bit nerve racking, but as long as you are open and honest with your Doctor, it’ll be a walk in the park. Go vagina squad!

  • I cry at EVERY pelvic exam i have had, except the one 6 weeks after giving birth. Why do I cry EVERY TIME?! And yes, i relax and tell myself on repeat “its not gonna hurt this time”. First one I was 19. I’m now 36.

  • Ahhh women apologizing for their body hair is such a big issue! I’m a physical therapist and the number of times women have apologized for their leg hair is really sad. As she said, I DON’T CARE! It’s just hair, it’s your body, it’s normal and fine! Please don’t apologize for having hair on your body!

  • I had the worst experience when getting my first pap smear, I initially told the nurse and doctor that I was nervous and had never had the exam before. This was the first time I didn’t have someone with me at any dr appt… which made me believe that this specific experience would’ve been different if someone else was with me (my mom or boyfriend would usually go with me).
    Saying that the doctor spent more than 5 minutes with me would be generous. Her words to me were “Relax” (when I verbally told her that it hurt and cried out from the pain), she did the exam, stood up and asked me if I was on birth control, and walked out. She didn’t ask any further questions, didn’t ask if I was okay, or even ask if I had questions. I experienced the WORST pain of my life, bled from the exam, and spotted the day of and the day after the exam. The nurse that was with her just gave me a tissue & told me to get dressed and the front desk would tell me when my next appointment would be. As a 23 year old, never have I felt so terrified of going to the doctor. I’ve always had a wonderful experience with all my physicians but this Ob/Gyn just didn’t seem to care. I had been going to this specific office for a few years and had never been attended by this specific doctor.

  • I always say pap smears/pelvic exams are kinda awkward and a bit uncomfortable but otherwise fine. That being said I get mine done regularly around my birthday, and I do sometimes wonder if it would be weird to book it in for my birthday, because then it’s like don’t I have anything better to be doing on my birthday, but also, I generally don’t have anything better to be doing.