Your Son Or Daughter’s Concussion Recovery

 

Concussions: How do I explain my child’s injury to their school? | Children’s National

Video taken from the channel: Children’s National Hospital


 

Q&A About Concussion Symptoms The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (2 of 8)

Video taken from the channel: The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia


 

HeadCheck quickly assists in recognising symptoms of concussion in your child

Video taken from the channel: Murdoch Children’s Research Institute


 

Dr. Hart discusses concussions in children.mov

Video taken from the channel: CenterforBrainHealth


 

Concussions in Children: Symptoms

Video taken from the channel: All Health TV


 

Concussion Symptoms and Treatments for Children

Video taken from the channel: Banner Health


 

Recognizing the Signs of Concussions in Children

Video taken from the channel: Tampa General Hospital


1.Rest Early on, limit physical and thinking/remembering activities to avoid symptoms getting worse. Avoid activities that put your child at risk for another injury to the head and brain. Get a good night’s sleep and take naps during the day as needed. If your child is recovering from a concussion, it is best to avoid the following: Screen time (phones, computers and television) Loud noises Reading Texting Any causes of excessive stress. Factors that may delay recovery include your child having: a history of a previous concussion or other brain injury, neurological or mental health disorders, learning difficulties, or family and social stressors.

Children’s developing brains need more time than adult brains to recover from a concussion. Studies suggest that pediatric concussion patients who participate in cognitive rest take less time to recover than those who do not. 1,2 In fact, some experts believe that getting adequate brain rest can shorten recovery time by 50% or more. 3. With their young minds still developing, kids with concussions need to take time-outs both mentally and physically to fully heal, new research shows. “After a concussion, kids need 3 to 5.

For most people, only short-term changes or support services are needed as they recover from a concussion. If symptoms persist, talk with your child’s doctor about formal support services they recommend. If the injury was work-related, make sure your child reports it right away to their employer and their workers’ compensation office.

Most children will recover fully from a concussion. But for some, the effects can be serious and long-lasting. The risk of severe complications is why people should always take a concussion in a.

If your child has had a concussion, it’s extremely important to prevent another concussion or head injury. Repeated concussions can cause permanent. Concussion recovery is rarely straightforward. Improvement is often two steps forward, one back, rather than a steady progression of regular improvement until your child gets completely better.

People fully recover from concussion within 1 month in most cases. Some factors can help recovery, including getting plenty of rest and eating a healthful, high protein diet. A.

List of related literature:

Because children with head injuries are often transported long distances, it is difficult for them to have evacuation of a cerebral hematoma within 4 hours.172 Despite the fact that excellent motor recovery is expected in most children after a head injury, children are often left with some residual deficits.

“Rockwood and Wilkins' Fractures in Children” by James H. Beaty, Charles A. Rockwood, James R. Kasser
from Rockwood and Wilkins’ Fractures in Children
by James H. Beaty, Charles A. Rockwood, James R. Kasser
Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2010

•If your child suffers a blow to the head, experiences dizziness or blurred vision, or becomes disoriented for more than a few minutes (signs of concussion).

“Linda Page's Healthy Healing: A Guide To Self-Healing For Everyone” by Linda Page
from Linda Page’s Healthy Healing: A Guide To Self-Healing For Everyone
by Linda Page
Healthy Healing Publications, 2004

Medical consultation to rule out serious head injury is indicated immediately if the child is positive for these findings 3.

“Clinical Cases in Pediatric Dentistry” by Amr M. Moursi, Marcio A. da Fonseca, Amy L. Truesdale
from Clinical Cases in Pediatric Dentistry
by Amr M. Moursi, Marcio A. da Fonseca, Amy L. Truesdale
Wiley, 2012

Children with moderate-risk injuries will present with an altered level of consciousness, progressive headache, or vomiting and may have an associated injury.

“Critical Care Transport” by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), UMBC
from Critical Care Transport
by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), UMBC
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2017

Most head injuries in children are mild and not associated with brain injury or long-term problems, but no head injury is too trivial to ignore.

“School Nursing: A Comprehensive Text” by Janice Selekman, Robin Adair Shannon, Catherine F Yonkaitis
from School Nursing: A Comprehensive Text
by Janice Selekman, Robin Adair Shannon, Catherine F Yonkaitis
F. A. Davis Company, 2019

In general, children with mild to moderate TBI are admitted to the hospital for observation if they have any neurologic deficits, seizures, vomiting, severe headache, fever, prolonged loss of consciousness, skull fracture, altered level of consciousness, or suspected child maltreatment.28

“Sheehy's Emergency Nursing E-Book: Principles and Practice” by Emergency Nurses Association
from Sheehy’s Emergency Nursing E-Book: Principles and Practice
by Emergency Nurses Association
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Severe concussions usually require at least four weeks of recovery; only a head specialist should give permission for the child to return.

“Coaching Baseball For Dummies” by The National Alliance For Youth Sports, Greg Bach
from Coaching Baseball For Dummies
by The National Alliance For Youth Sports, Greg Bach
Wiley, 2011

Severe Head Injuries The outcome following severe head injuries is usually better for children than for adults, but children less than 1 year of age have double the mortality of those between 1 and 6 years, and three times the mortality of those between 6 and 12 years.

“Fenichel's Clinical Pediatric Neurology E-Book: A Signs and Symptoms Approach” by J. Eric Piña-Garza, Kaitlin C. James, Gerald M Fenichel
from Fenichel’s Clinical Pediatric Neurology E-Book: A Signs and Symptoms Approach
by J. Eric Piña-Garza, Kaitlin C. James, Gerald M Fenichel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The American Academy of Pediatrics has published guidelines for the management of minor head injuries in children younger than and older than 2 years of age.

“Current Management in Child Neurology” by Bernard L. Maria
from Current Management in Child Neurology
by Bernard L. Maria
BC Decker, 2009

Children with moderate head injuries (GCS 9 to 12) may require admission or prolonged observation in the ED until their mental status stabilizes; children with severe head injuries (GCS less than 8 or coma and

“Pediatric Primary Care E-Book” by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, Margaret A. Brady, Nancy Barber Starr, Catherine G. Blosser, Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks
from Pediatric Primary Care E-Book
by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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