Why Kids Should Consume More Fruit

 

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Fruits are important too though, as they are: A good low-fat food Low in salt Low in calories A healthy food with no cholesterol Usually good. 6 in 10 children didn’t eat enough fruit in 2007-2010. As children get older, they eat less fruit.

Most children need to eat more vegetables. 9 in 10 children didn’t eat enough vegetables in 2007-2010. Children should eat a variety of colorful vegetables prepared in healthy ways. About 1/3 of vegetables children ate in 2009-2010 were white. Five Reasons Why Kids Have to Eat Fruit Low in Fat and Calories.

One out of three children is overweight or obese, largely due to unhealthy diets high in fat Fiber. Fresh fruit is a nutritious source of fiber, which many children don’t get enough of in their daily diets. Vitamins and Minerals. Children should eat two servings of fruit and another two to three of vegetables daily.

To keep things simple, think of a medium-sized fruit, such as an apple or banana as serving, or two to three smallish items, such as kiwi or strawberries. If your child is eating more than two servings, they may face complications, includin. Fruits and Vegetables and Energy Busy lives require food that’s nutritious, energizing, and easy to eat on-the-go, like fresh fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are a natural source of energy and give the body many nutrients you need to keep going. Top 10 Reasons Why You Need To Eat Fruit 1. Eating lots of fruit lowers the risk of developing disease 2. Fruit makes you strong 3. Water content in fruit makes your skin soft and well hydrated 4. All fruit has antioxidants which combats free radicals 5. Fruit is high in fiber, helping ward off fats.

High-fiber foods, such as fruits and vegetables, help the digestive system function properly. Constipation in kids can often be eased by eating more high-fiber prunes, apricots, plums, peas, beans. Top 10 Reasons to Eat More Fruits & Vegetables 1. Fruits & Veggies are Nutritious AND Delicious! How Many Fruits & Vegetables Do You Need?

2. Fun to Eat!. Some crunch, some squirt, some you peel some you don’t, and some grow right in your own backyard! 3. Quick, Natural Snack.. Fruits and. Fruits and vegetables play a crucial role in supporting your child’s growth and development.

Besides, their adequate consumption is associated with reduced risk of major chronic diseases. But for parents, it is usually a challenge to make their children eat enough fruits and vegetables. 3. Eating fruits and vegetables boosts the immune system.

Eating more vegetables will also boost your immune system and that means fewer coughs and colds and other ailments. Fruit and vegetables provide your body with a whole range of important vitamins and minerals, which keep your immune system in good working order.

List of related literature:

Toddlers and preschool children often fail to meet the recommended servings of fruits, vegetables, and fiber, whereas intakes of food with fat and added sugar are high.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set” by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, Joseph St. Geme, MD, Nina F Schor, MD, PhD
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set
by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Preschool children also lag behind current recommendations for the number of servings of fruits, vegetables, and fiber, whereas intakes of food with fat and added sugar are high.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book” by Robert M. Kliegman, Bonita F. Stanton, Joseph St. Geme, Nina F Schor, Richard E. Behrman
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book
by Robert M. Kliegman, Bonita F. Stanton, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Toddlers who drink excess fruit juice and eat well may develop overweight or obesity because of the high sugar content in the juice.

“Maternity and Pediatric Nursing” by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
from Maternity and Pediatric Nursing
by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Young children drink large quantities of fruit juices, such as apple juice, and this may displace higher calorie, more nutrient-rich foods in their diet, causing malnutrition, diarrhea, and tooth decay.

“The Encyclopedia of Nutrition and Good Health” by Robert A. Ronzio
from The Encyclopedia of Nutrition and Good Health
by Robert A. Ronzio
Facts On File, 2003

First, data have shown that children and adolescents do not meet recommended intakes of fruits and vegetables, foods that are correlated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease/some types of cancer and that also may assist with weight maintenance.

“Nutrition Education: Linking Research, Theory, and Practice” by Isobel R. Contento
from Nutrition Education: Linking Research, Theory, and Practice
by Isobel R. Contento
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

For example, vitamin C–fortified fruit snacks may be consumed as a source of vitamin C. While this would help children meet their vitamin C requirement, it would also increase their intake of added sugars and reduce the likelihood that they will meet their needs for other nutrients.

“Visualizing Nutrition: Everyday Choices” by Mary B. Grosvenor, Lori A. Smolin
from Visualizing Nutrition: Everyday Choices
by Mary B. Grosvenor, Lori A. Smolin
Wiley, 2017

Health and nutrition authorities recommend that children and adults eat two or more servings of fruit everyday.

“Handbook of Hispanic Culture-Anthropology” by Nicolás Kanellos
from Handbook of Hispanic Culture-Anthropology
by Nicolás Kanellos
Arte Publico Press,

Excess juice intake contributes to obesity by increasing caloric intake and can contribute to failure to thrive in children who drink juice in place of eating more nutritious food.

“Netter's Pediatrics E-Book” by Todd Florin, Stephen Ludwig, MD, Paul L. Aronson, Heidi C. Werner
from Netter’s Pediatrics E-Book
by Todd Florin, Stephen Ludwig, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

It has been suggested that because children are more likely to consume juice than any other age group, they more easily meet fruit and vegetable recommendations (Black and Billette, 2013).

“Postharvest Handling: A Systems Approach” by Wojciech J. Florkowski, Robert L. Shewfelt, Stanley E. Prussia, Nigel Banks
from Postharvest Handling: A Systems Approach
by Wojciech J. Florkowski, Robert L. Shewfelt, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2014

Not surprisingly, evidence shows that populations who eat more fruit have a lower BMI and lower risk of developing many chronic diseases, including high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, certain cancers, type II diabetes, digestive diseases, and obesity.

“Crazy Sexy Juice: 100+ Simple Juice, Smoothie & Nut Milk Recipes to Supercharge Your Health” by Kris Carr
from Crazy Sexy Juice: 100+ Simple Juice, Smoothie & Nut Milk Recipes to Supercharge Your Health
by Kris Carr
Hay House, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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