What Pediatricians Say About Whether Trampolines Are Secure for children

AAP is the professional organization for pediatricians in the U.S, and it “strongly discourages” use of home trampolines. 1. The most common trampoline-related injury is a sprained ankle; this isn’t severe, but can be painful and will limit kids’ participation in sports and other activities. Broken bones and dislocations are also a risk, especially for young children. Trampoline jumping poses a high risk of injury for children.

The activity can result in sprains and fractures in the arms or legs — as well as head and neck injuries. The risk of injury is so high that the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly discourages the use of trampolines at home. Trampoline park injuries also are on the rise. (CBS News) The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is discouraging the recreational use of trampolines, saying the activity poses a major injury risk for kids and there’s no clear way to reduce. However, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons strongly discourage the use of home trampolines, especially for children younger than 6. Each year.

Trampolines are too dangerous for children to use, the American Academy of Pediatrics said Monday. Citing nearly 100,000 injuries in 2009, the academy issued the warning in a statement published in. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, no trampoline is totally safe. Trampoline Safety Risks To most effectively guard against the safety risks inherent with trampolines, it’s important to understand them first, so let’s take a look at some together.

The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests trampolines should never be used unless athletes are being supervised in training for a sport like diving or gymnastics. As the weather warms each season, however, pediatric orthopaedists tend to. Turns out it’s really hard to quantify the risk trampolines pose—I’ll explain why in a bit—yet most pediatricians and orthopedists agree: Trampolines are a terrible idea for young kids and not so.

While the Trump administration is urging schools to open in the fall, many parents remain concerned about the safety of their children.Amid the coronavirus pandemic, is going back to school safe? The American Academy of Pediatrics has some answers. The nation’s top pediatrician group made headlines last month after releasing clinical guidance saying this. Pediatricians know how addictive and fun trampolines can be for kids.

Unfortunately, we often see trampoline-related accidents in our exam rooms because kids don’t understand the proper safety precautions before they start jumping. As a result, we find ourselves treating fractures and sprains in the wrists, back and knees. As a parent, it’s vital to monitor.

List of related literature:

Trampolines are especially hazardous because of the increased risk of neck hyperflexion, hyperextension, and rotation if the child falls from the trampoline.

“Advanced Pediatric Assessment, Second Edition” by Ellen Chiocca, RNC, MSN, CPNP, Ellen M. Chiocca, MSN, CPNP, APN, RNC-NIC
from Advanced Pediatric Assessment, Second Edition
by Ellen Chiocca, RNC, MSN, CPNP, Ellen M. Chiocca, MSN, CPNP, APN, RNC-NIC
Springer Publishing Company, 2014

The American Academy of Pediatrics (1999) recommends that trampolines should never used in the home environment, in routine physical education classes, or in outdoor playgrounds.

“Sports Science Handbook: A-H” by Simon P. R. Jenkins
from Sports Science Handbook: A-H
by Simon P. R. Jenkins
Multi-Science, 2005

Trampolines and indoor trampoline parks are popular with young children and can cause significant injuries, including fractures, sprains, and head injuries.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

The American Academy of Pediatrics does not advocate the use of home trampolines and further states that trampolines should not be regarded as play equipment.

“Pediatric Nursing: An Introductory Text” by Debra L. Price, Julie F. Gwin
from Pediatric Nursing: An Introductory Text
by Debra L. Price, Julie F. Gwin
Elsevier Saunders, 2008

Young children should always be supervised when using trampolines even though it has been acknowledged that more than half of trampoline accidents occur while under supervision from parents or carers.

“Accident & Emergency: Theory Into Practice” by Brian Dolan, Lynda Holt
from Accident & Emergency: Theory Into Practice
by Brian Dolan, Lynda Holt
Baillière Tindall Elsevier, 2008

Briskin S, LaBotz M: Trampoline safety in childhood and adolescence, Pediatrics 130:774, 2012.

“Tachdjian's Pediatric Orthopaedics: From the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children” by John A. Herring
from Tachdjian’s Pediatric Orthopaedics: From the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children
by John A. Herring
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Trampolines appeal to children of all ages: at first children may need us to hold their hands and bounce with them for security or to have the trampoline to themselves so they feel more in control of the movement.

“Reparenting the Child who Hurts: A Guide to Healing Developmental Trauma and Attachments” by Caroline Archer, Christine Ann Gordon
from Reparenting the Child who Hurts: A Guide to Healing Developmental Trauma and Attachments
by Caroline Archer, Christine Ann Gordon
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2013

Trampolines are popular with young children, and continue to cause significant injuries.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong, Annette Baker, R.N., Patrick Barrera, Debbie Fraser Askin
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, et. al.
Mosby/Elsevier, 2013

Trampoline injuries are highest in children 5 through 14 years and account for numerous fractures, sprains, and head injuries.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing9: Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing9: Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong
Elsevier/Mosby, 2013

Certain repetitive physical activities can serve both functions, and I have met many families where the trampoline has proved to be an essential piece of kit for this reason.

“Attachment in Common Sense and Doodles: A Practical Guide” by Miriam Silver
from Attachment in Common Sense and Doodles: A Practical Guide
by Miriam Silver
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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