Summer time Vehicle Seat Safety for your kids

 

Car Seat Safety from Insurance of the Carolinas: Summer Safety with Safe Kids

Video taken from the channel: UNC Trauma Program


 

Summer Car Safety for Kids

Video taken from the channel: Saint Luke’s Health System


 

Car Seat Safety Summer Safety Travel Tips

Video taken from the channel: EvenfloBestForBaby


 

Car Seat Safety Tips

Video taken from the channel: Children’s Minnesota Minneapolis


 

Kids Safety Kids Summer Car Safety

Video taken from the channel: WKNO


 

Car Seat Safety By Age: Infants in Rear-facing Seats (Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia)

Video taken from the channel: ChildPassengerSafety


 

Car seat safety: Are Australian children safe?

Video taken from the channel: The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne


Summer Car Seat Safety for Your Children General Tips for Car Summer Safety. Whether you’re packing up the car for a road trip or just taking a trip down the Talking to Your Child. One of the most important things you can do is a parent is talking to your child about car safety.

Always check the areas of the car seat that come in contact with a child in order to avoid burns. Some seat manufacturers recommend placing a. Keep your child chilled in the car with a car seat sunshade and more.

Lose the loose items: From beach chairs to suitcases, there’s a lot of gear that accompanies a summer road trip. Summer-ize Your Safety Plan 15 comments Summer’s heat presents special risks to children traveling in the back seat: Roughly 800 children died from heatstroke after accidentally being locked in hot cars between 1990 and 2015, according to the. Read the labels on the seat to see the weight and height limits for your child now and for his or her growth later.

Keep your child rear-facing in this seat until he or she reaches the seat’s upper weight and height limits. Most seats will accommodate children up to 40 pounds. You’ll need to decide on using either the seat belt or lower anchors to secure your car seat. Both are safe, but don’t use them both at the same time. Once your child is forward facing, it is important to use the tether with the seat belt or lower anchors.

Get more. To maximize safety, keep your child in the car seat for as long as possible, as long as the child fits within the manufacturer’s height and weight requirements. Keep your child in the back seat at least through age 12. And remember, the guidelines often change as new research identifies better safety practices – so check back often.

Car seat use reduces the risk for injury in crashes by 71–82% for children, when compared with seat belt use alone. Booster seat use reduces the risk for serious injury by 45% for children aged 4-8, when compared with seat belt use alone. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to.

The Car Seat Finder is an easy-to-use tool that helps you find the right car seat for your child. Just fill out your child’s age, height and weight above, and you’ll be provided car seat types that fit your child. Make sure you’re familiar with the four types of car seats and NHTSA’s recommendations for choosing the right type of seat.

List of related literature:

It is now recommended that all infants and toddlers ride in rearfacing car safety seats until they reach the age of 2 years or height recommended by the car seat manufacturer (Durbin and AAP Committee on Injury, Violence, Poison Prevention, 2011).

“Maternal Child Nursing Care” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier, 2013

Although federal safety standards do not specify the minimum weight of an infant and the appropriate type of restraint, newborns weighing 2000 g (4.4 lb) receive relatively good support in convertible seats with a seat back–to–crotch strap height of 14 cm (5.5 inches) or less.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

However, with proper seating placement of the child within the car and usage of ageand size-appropriate car seats or booster seats, almost one-third of these deaths can be prevented, and injuries can be reduced by more than half (188–191).

“Brain Injury Medicine: Principles and Practice” by David B. Arciniegas, MD, M. Ross Bullock, MD, PHD, Douglas I. Katz, MD, Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, PHD, ABPP, Ross D. Zafonte, DO, Nathan D. Zasler, MD
from Brain Injury Medicine: Principles and Practice
by David B. Arciniegas, MD, M. Ross Bullock, MD, PHD, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2012

Seats with shields (large padded surfaces in front of the child) and armrests (found on some older models) are unacceptable because of their proximity to the infant’s face and neck.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition” by A. Judie
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition
by A. Judie
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Seats with shields (large padded surfaces in front of the child) and armrests (found on some other models) are unacceptable because of their proximity to the infant’s face and neck.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing9: Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing9: Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong
Elsevier/Mosby, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP, 2011a) recommends that all infants and toddlers ride in the back seat with a rear-facing-only seat and rear-facing convertible seat until they are 2 years of age or they reach the highest weight or height allowed by the manufacturer of the car safety seat.

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP, 2018a) recommends the following: • Infants and toddlers should ride in a rear-facing car safety seat (Fig. 27.1) as long as possible, until they reach the highest weight or height allowed by their seat (see manufacturer’s directions).

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Convertible safety seats should be used until the child weighs at least 13.6 kg or more regardless of age and as long as the child fits properly into the seat (van Schaik & CPS, Injury Prevention Committee, 2008).

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Adult seat belts are unsuitable for infants or children younger than 4 years because their pelvic structure is small; the AAP recommends that safety seats for infants be used (USDHHS, 2010).

“Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book” by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
from Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book
by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

A child seat placed in the front car seat close to the passenger air bag can be dangerous (Fig. 15.4).

“Leifer's Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book” by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
from Leifer’s Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book
by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • My question is, if you know rear facing longer is better, why is it legal in australia to forward face at 6 months and ILLEGAL to rear face a child after they turn four? The c3 vertibrea doesn’t fully ossify until 4-6 years old, parents should NOT be fined ridiculous amounts of money for keeping their children safer by rear facing longer. And children should definitely not be rf before age two. The law where I live in the USA is rf to a minimum of two. My 5 year old is still RF and will for about two more years.