Preventing Holiday Anxiety and stress in youngsters

 

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To minimize anxiety in children during the holidays, take steps to handle your own stress and anxiety. Set Up Conditions for Good Behavior. Avoid taking your child to places such as the mall or holiday gatherings when he is hungry or tired. Don’t neglect nutrition.

It’s fun to indulge in sweets and extra desserts during the holiday season, but excess sugar and caffeine can trigger increased anxiety. Focus on healthy eating for. behavior and are more likely to experience holiday stress when theyʼre exhausted or hungry.

3. Remember the importance of routines. The holidays can throw a big wrench into household routines, and that can play a role in anxiety in children. To minimize holiday stress in your kids, try to get routines back on track once an event or party is over. To reduce holiday stress, you have to pace yourself. Long before the family gatherings actually happen, decide on some limits and stick to them.

Stay one or two nights at your parents’ house. As a caregiver, you’re more likely to experience symptoms of depression or anxiety. In addition, you may not get enough sleep or physical activity, or eat a balanced diet — which increases your risk of medical problems, such as heart disease and diabetes. It’s better to desensitize your child to triggers of anxiety by taking small steps. Try looking at pictures of different breeds online and talking about what feelings they trigger.

Next, watch dogs at play at a dog park from a safe distance. Finally, ask to visit with a calm, older dog of a friend or a therapy dog. For some adults and children alike, the holidays can unfortunately create an increased amount of stress, making it the least enjoyable time of year. With adults, a heightened level of stress is expected and considered common throughout these last two months when schedules are tighter than normal, calendars are overflowing with commitments and.

The following tips can help prevent stress, anxiety, and mild depression associated with the holiday season: Make realistic expectations for the holiday season. Set realistic goals for yourself. While we can’t prevent traumatic events from happening, we can prevent anxiety and stress from taking over. Here are some ways to help prevent anxiety.

It is an unfortunate but very real fact that stress and anxiety in children is a common problem in today’s fast-paced, high-tech, activity-packed society. If your child is experiencing stress and anxiety, try these simple but effective ways to help her manage her fear, worry, and upset.

List of related literature:

By planning ahead, keeping an open dialogue with your child, validating his or her feelings and, most importantly, by focusing on family and fun rather than on food, your entire family will enjoy each holiday.

“Keto Kid: Helping Your Child Succeed on the Ketogenic Diet” by Deborah Ann Snyder, DO
from Keto Kid: Helping Your Child Succeed on the Ketogenic Diet
by Deborah Ann Snyder, DO
Springer Publishing Company, 2006

“It is quite typical for children, especially those under six, to experience anxiety before a parent leaves for the day or for a more extended trip,” says Karen Friedland­Brown, a parent educator at Jewish Family and Children’s Services.

“Getting to 50/50: How Working Parents Can Have It All” by Sharon Meers, Joanna Strober
from Getting to 50/50: How Working Parents Can Have It All
by Sharon Meers, Joanna Strober
Viva Editions, 2013

Children may be invited to set aside 15 minutes each day and actively engage in worrying during that period under the supervision of their parents to help them gain control of the worrying process (and this may go some way to alleviate type 2 worry).

“The Handbook of Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychology: A Contextual Approach” by Alan Carr
from The Handbook of Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychology: A Contextual Approach
by Alan Carr
Taylor & Francis, 2015

Following regular daily routines (as much as possible) helps let children know that despite the illness, there is stability and thus security.

“Massachusetts General Hospital Handbook of General Hospital Psychiatry E-Book” by Theodore A. Stern, Gregory L. Fricchione, Jerrold F. Rosenbaum
from Massachusetts General Hospital Handbook of General Hospital Psychiatry E-Book
by Theodore A. Stern, Gregory L. Fricchione, Jerrold F. Rosenbaum
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Anything the parent can do to alleviate the child’s anxiety, such as reassuring him or her that the parent will be okay and continuing the child’s normal routine (e.g., normal bedtimes, snacks, play times), will help the child to feel secure.

“Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing for Canadian Practice” by Wendy Austin, Mary Ann Boyd
from Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing for Canadian Practice
by Wendy Austin, Mary Ann Boyd
Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010

It might be helpful to encourage children with GAD who have sleeprelated worries to follow the “Worry Box” strategies, and to talk to their parent about these worries at an agreed-upon time—“Worry Time” (see Chapter 4)—to promote independence in dealing with their worries and a sense of control over them.

“Parent-Led CBT for Child Anxiety: Helping Parents Help Their Kids” by Cathy Creswell, Monika Parkinson, Kerstin Thirlwall, Lucy Willetts, Michael A. Southam-Gerow
from Parent-Led CBT for Child Anxiety: Helping Parents Help Their Kids
by Cathy Creswell, Monika Parkinson, et. al.
Guilford Publications, 2019

Parents can minimize this by alerting visitors to the toddler’s needs, having small presents on hand for the toddler, and including the child in the visit as much as possible.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong, Annette Baker, R.N., Patrick Barrera, Debbie Fraser Askin
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, et. al.
Mosby/Elsevier, 2013

Make up several stories of other children who have anxiety and ask your child to come up with ideas for how those children could learn to cope better.

“Helping Your Anxious Child: A Step-by-Step Guide for Parents” by Ronald Rapee, Ann Wignall, Susan Spence, Heidi Lyneham, Vanessa Cobham
from Helping Your Anxious Child: A Step-by-Step Guide for Parents
by Ronald Rapee, Ann Wignall, et. al.
New Harbinger Publications, 2008

Teach child relaxation techniques to reduce anxiety and stress.

“Lippincott's Content Review for NCLEX-RN” by Diane M. Billings
from Lippincott’s Content Review for NCLEX-RN
by Diane M. Billings
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

By reducing these anxieties and managing them better, there will be more good days, children will develop more strategies themselves, and will be better prepared for their adult life.

“Understanding Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome in Children: A Guide for Parents, Teachers and Other Professionals” by Margaret Duncan, Zara Healy, Ruth Fidler, Phil Christie
from Understanding Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome in Children: A Guide for Parents, Teachers and Other Professionals
by Margaret Duncan, Zara Healy, et. al.
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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9 comments

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  • just an FYI, (presumably) all of your descriptions link to 404 pages on your website.
    or, How-to-URL: “capitalisation matters”.
    also: always check your links before posting..

  • Another great video. I am a huge fan of writing things down and creating to do lists. It gives me such satisfaction when I am able to cross something off my list and mark it as done!

  • K A T I E I love this…Im making a video to help those that are chronically ill and tips for the holidays and I HAVE to share this video with them as well. Your like an open book and I love that 😉 xx

  • These tips are fantastic. eg Save time for selfcare is very important. Doing excercises to de-tension the body in addition to other routines is equally helpful. For more information check out and READ… Overcoming Stress: Successful Stress management for moms/ kindle

  • Finally i realize that you are the only one who can inspire me from the within… I recommend your videos and audio.. And he said.. He can see your influence on me… Thank you so much…

  • I have a question about the 7 events to plan as well as self-care. I am very far along in my recovery but I still for some reason struggle with self-care, especially hygiene which is a bit embarrassing to admit haha. So for things like bathing, brushing teeth, washing my face, etc, should those go on my list of 7 separately or as one event?

  • Do you have holiday already? o.o
    Out holiday starts at December 23rd and it’s really not easy to manage school and all this.. christmas stuff at the same time..^^

  • #katifaq hi katie! thank you for your videos. I was wondering if you had any advice for a combination of alcohol and eating disorder related behaviors over the holidays. I’ve been in and out of treatment for eating disorders for the past 6 years and stopped the last treatment in April. I have noticed that recent holidays I have swapped food calories for alcohol. I don’t get drunk or anything I just seem to use the act of drinking as well as the buzz to abstain from foods that give me anxiety, which pretty much involves almost all foods typically present at holiday gatherings. This helps me not purge, but I realize it’s also a form of food restriction. Do you have any advice for normalizing eating over the times of high calorie and fat foods? thank you!

  • I can’t wait to see your holiday gift guide! I already love seeing gift guides in general but I can’t wait to see yours especially!