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That may be why choking continues to be one of the leading causes of death for children under age four or five. 1  This includes choking on food and non-food items, such as: Whole grapes Peanuts and other nuts Popcorn Hard candy and chewing gum Hard foods, including raw vegetables Soft foods, such. You can prevent your child from choking by keeping their play area free of small objects, such as coins, erasers, and building blocks. Chop your child’s food into small pieces, making it.

Which Toys and Other Small Objects Are Choking Hazards? balloons toys with small parts and doll accessories coins safety pins paperclips push pins marbles and small balls nails, bolts, and screws erasers batteries broken crayons jewelry (rings, earrings, pins, etc.) small magnets small caps for. Choking Hazards Parents of Young Children Should Know About Young children 6 months to 3 years old are at the highest risk for choking on food and non-food items. Food is a common choking hazard. Many children do not chew their food well so they try to swallow it whole.

Foods that are the most dangerous are round and hard. If your child is 4 years of age or younger either take extra safety measures or don’t feed the following foods to your children at al. First of all, the rule of thumb actually does apply to food items: Everything should be cut smaller than a thumb’s width before it’s served to children. “Anything that is the size of the airway.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, choking is a lead cause of injury among children 4 and younger. The most common cause of nonfatal choking incidents is food, most commonly hard. Choking hazards for kids are mainly food items, particularly the top 10 foods identified by the HSE: Hot dogs/sausages Raw carrot Apples Grapes (and similar shaped fruit and vegetables, e.g., cherry tomatoes, soft fruits) Nuts Peanut butter Marshmallows Chewing gum Boiled sweets Popcorn. Never let children of any age play with uninflated or broken balloons because of the choking danger.

Avoid marbles, balls, and games with balls that have a diameter of 1.75 inches or less. These products also pose a choking hazard to young children. Children at this age pull, prod and twist toys. Food items to avoid, as they are potential choking hazards, include: popcorn, whole grapes, peanuts, hard candies or cough drops, hot dogs, gum, big pieces of meat, raw veggies, ice cubes, seeds, marshmallows.

Be mindful of other older children giving food to a younger child. Don’t rush your child when eating.

List of related literature:

This practice creates a choke hazard for children under 3 years of age.12 In addition, parents and other caregivers should be advised to keep deflated balloons and broken balloon pieces away from children.

“Mosby's Paramedic Textbook” by Mick J. Sanders, Lawrence M. Lewis, Kim D. McKenna, Gary Quick, Kim McKenna
from Mosby’s Paramedic Textbook
by Mick J. Sanders, Lawrence M. Lewis, et. al.
Elsevier/Mosby Jems, 2012

Choose age appropriate toys and games for children and check for any small parts that may be a choking hazard because children have the need to put everyday objects in their mouths (Safekids.org, 2015).

“Nursing Diagnosis Handbook E-Book: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care” by Betty J. Ackley, Gail B. Ladwig, Mary Beth Makic, Marina Martinez-Kratz, Melody Zanotti
from Nursing Diagnosis Handbook E-Book: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care
by Betty J. Ackley, Gail B. Ladwig, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Follow these guidelines to help prevent your child from choking:

“Pediatric Telephone Advice” by Barton D. Schmitt
from Pediatric Telephone Advice
by Barton D. Schmitt
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2004

Children under age five are most at risk of choking on toys or parts of toys.

“Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care: 9th Edition” by Benjamin Spock, Robert Needlman
from Dr. Spock’s Baby and Child Care: 9th Edition
by Benjamin Spock, Robert Needlman
Pocket Books, 2011

Toddlers often run with small toys or objects in their mouths, so caution should be taken with any materials that could lead to choking.

“Therapeutic Activities for Children and Teens Coping with Health Issues” by Robyn Hart, Judy Rollins
from Therapeutic Activities for Children and Teens Coping with Health Issues
by Robyn Hart, Judy Rollins
Wiley, 2011

To prevent choking, the child should be placed on his or her side or stomach.

“Consumer Health USA” by Alan M. Rees
from Consumer Health USA
by Alan M. Rees
Oryx Press, 1997

Families need to be cognizant of choking hazards for small children.

“Foundations of Nursing E-Book” by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
from Foundations of Nursing E-Book
by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

For infants, toddlers, and all children who still mouth objects, avoid toys with small parts that may pose a fatal choking or aspiration hazard.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

• Avoid toys with small removable parts that can be placed in the child’s mouth and either swallowed or aspirated.

“Journey Across the Life Span: Human Development and Health Promotion” by Elaine U Polan, Daphne R Taylor
from Journey Across the Life Span: Human Development and Health Promotion
by Elaine U Polan, Daphne R Taylor
F.A. Davis Company, 2019

The first aid procedures for choking in infants and children differ from those in adults but obviously it is preferable to prevent choking in the first place by identifying the risks and excluding them whenever possible, such as by choosing toys suitable for a child’s age.

“Foundations of Nursing Practice E-Book: Fundamentals of Holistic Care” by Chris Brooker, Anne Waugh
from Foundations of Nursing Practice E-Book: Fundamentals of Holistic Care
by Chris Brooker, Anne Waugh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Watching this with my parents, dad says “yeah you gotta cut them.” Mom says “we never cut them for her” dad answers “well no. She knew enough to chew them”������