Goes Barefoot Healthier for your children

 

VIVOBAREFOOT kids Barefoot is best

Video taken from the channel: VIVOBAREFOOT


 

Is Going Barefoot in Public Good for Your Health?

Video taken from the channel: The Doctors


 

When going barefoot is not a choice

Video taken from the channel: Children International


 

Is Walking Barefoot Healthy?

Video taken from the channel: Anna Walton


 

Choosing Kids Shoes: Healthy, Minimalist Footwear for Children

Video taken from the channel: SoleFit


 

Why You Shouldn’t Walk Barefoot Around The House

Video taken from the channel: The List


 

Walk Barefoot for 5 Mins a Day, See What Happens to You

Video taken from the channel: BRIGHT SIDE


In fact, the opposite might be true—going shoeless helps a just-toddling toddler improve her balance, strength, and coordination. The only measure that needs to be taken into consideration when choosing whether or not to put shoes on your child is the temperature of the surface on which the child is walking. Walking barefoot might be something you only do at home. But for many, walking and exercising barefoot is a practice they do daily.

When a toddler is. There is general consensus that walking barefoot has many health benefits, especially for growing children. There are however people who think it is a passing fad with little or no real value – except for the fact that one can save on buying shoes! Fortunately, there are so many studies on the subject, providing empirical proof of the immense value of letting your children go barefoot, that only.

Walking barefoot enhances our natural senses – you feel the gritty sandy beach, the prickly grass, the squelchy mud, the trickling water and more. Going shoe-less directly connects your child to the natural world and it does wonders for their mental, social and emotional wellbeing. Encourage happy, healthy feet to explore the world!Helps your child achieve the correct foot posture for beginning to walk. Going barefoot is less stressful on the knees and allows for better strengthening of the legs.

Going without shoes is beneficial for foot and ankle muscles. Walking in bare feet. In another study by Natural Child Magazine, Dr.

Kacie Flegal, D.C., suggests that when children are barefoot, it allows a development of higher brain centers, which allows for better problem-solving skills, language skills, social skills, regulation of emotions and confidence. In an article from SixWise, they discuss some of the many health benefits of going barefoot: The book (“Take Off Your Shoes and Walk” by Simon J. Wikler D.S.C.)also describes a study performed from 1957-1960 that examined whether a mother’s objections to letting her child walk barefoot influenced the health of the child’s feet. Do you have difficulty keeping your kids in their footwear?

Research shows you can actually be doing them a favor by removing their shoes and socks and letting them go barefoot permanently! Also known as earthing, allowing children to live an unshod life has been shown to have many conveniences and health benefits. Firstly, the answer depends on where you are in the world and your social class. In some locations, mainly tropical and where this is poverty (unfortunately), kids still go barefoot all the time.

So I’ll answer from my experience in Queensland, Australia. When I grew up in the. Going barefoot increases children’s balance and helps them develop good posture.

Experts have found that toddlers keep their heads up more when they walk barefoot because of the sensory feedback they get from the ground that they do not feel while wearing shoes.

List of related literature:

The toddler may go barefoot whenever it is safe because this strengthens the foot muscles.

“Leifer's Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book” by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
from Leifer’s Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book
by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The toddler may go barefoot whenever it is safe and possible, because this strengthens the foot muscles.

“Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by Gloria Leifer
from Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by Gloria Leifer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

After a baby is standing and walking, there’s real value in leaving the child barefoot most of the time when conditions are suitable.

“Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care: 9th Edition” by Benjamin Spock, Robert Needlman
from Dr. Spock’s Baby and Child Care: 9th Edition
by Benjamin Spock, Robert Needlman
Pocket Books, 2011

Finally, a nested case-control study of 654 people aged over 65 years by Koepsell et al. [15] found that going barefoot or wearing stockings was associated with a ten-fold increased risk of falling, with athletic shoes being associated with the lowest risk.

“Falls in Older People: Risk Factors and Strategies for Prevention” by Stephen R. Lord, Catherine Sherrington, Hylton B. Menz, Jacqueline C. T. Close
from Falls in Older People: Risk Factors and Strategies for Prevention
by Stephen R. Lord, Catherine Sherrington, et. al.
Cambridge University Press, 2007

The more active a child becomes, the greater the need for sturdy shoes that protect the feet from injury.

“Potter & Perry's Fundamentals of Nursing AUS Version E-Book” by Jackie Crisp, Catherine Taylor, Clint Douglas, Geraldine Rebeiro
from Potter & Perry’s Fundamentals of Nursing AUS Version E-Book
by Jackie Crisp, Catherine Taylor, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Whenever possible, toddlers may go barefoot because this strengthens the foot muscles (Schmitt, 2005a).

“Pediatric Nursing: An Introductory Text” by Debra L. Price, Julie F. Gwin
from Pediatric Nursing: An Introductory Text
by Debra L. Price, Julie F. Gwin
Elsevier Saunders, 2008

There is no harm in the child’s walking barefoot for periods of time in the evenings or after a bath.

“Cerebral Palsy: A Complete Guide for Caregiving” by Freeman Miller, Steven J. Bachrach
from Cerebral Palsy: A Complete Guide for Caregiving
by Freeman Miller, Steven J. Bachrach
Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017

Let the child wear socks because a cold tile floor will distort the usual gait.

“Physical Examination and Health Assessment Canadian E-Book” by Carolyn Jarvis, Annette J. Browne, June MacDonald-Jenkins, Marian Luctkar-Flude
from Physical Examination and Health Assessment Canadian E-Book
by Carolyn Jarvis, Annette J. Browne, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Somewhat counter-intuitively, the risk of falling indoors has been shown to be increased in older people who go barefoot or only wear socks inside the house.

“Health Care for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities across the Lifespan” by I. Leslie Rubin, Joav Merrick, Donald E. Greydanus, Dilip R. Patel
from Health Care for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities across the Lifespan
by I. Leslie Rubin, Joav Merrick, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2016

It’s better to keep children in cotton socks and shoes, however hot the weather.

“Baby to Toddler Month by Month” by Simone Cave, Caroline Fertleman
from Baby to Toddler Month by Month
by Simone Cave, Caroline Fertleman
Hay House, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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14 comments

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  • Fantastic and makes so much sense. I think back to my kids almost 40 years ago now and they were in those terrible confining boots!!!

  • I always walk outside with no shoes ever since I was a little kid running in the back yard and even the snow I regret the snow part ������I’m 15 now and I still run outside barefooted

  • You also build up a tolerance to walking over things like pine needles and small rocks. At first, your feet will flinch as you walk on them, but after a while you get used to them.

  • I hate shoes. I am barefoot at home at work I Won’t germs and after getting to many things stuck to the botttom of my feet (tacs, thorns) and hot tar. I stopped walking barefoot outside

  • Amazing. I’ve been having right knee pain, and was having issues getting an appt. with a Dr. at this time. They recommended the E. R. No thanks. So I read your page, and thank God I did. Veuala. No more pain. Thanks for sharing.

  • YES, of course. Life is better barefoot than in shoes!!!

    Going barefoot is the gentlest way of walking and can symbolise a way of living being authentic, vulnerable, sensitive to our surroundings. It’s the feeling of enjoying warm sand beneath our toes, or carefully making our way over sharp rocks in the darkness. It’s a way of living that has the lightest impact, removing the barrier between us and nature.

    — Adele Coombs, “Barefoot Dreaming” ^_^

  • This a comment from a podiatrist, Stephen Bloor, who is also a barefooter and incorporates it into his practice in the UK:
    Too many subconscious biases in the medical experts minds to permit them to consider the benefits.

    And they are over-exaggerating the risks.

    And they are totally, absolutely, ignoring the huge risks of wearing footwear.

    From an infection risk, the incubating effect with enclosed footwear far outweighs the risks of going barefoot, when it comes to bacterial and fungal infections.

    And the risk of mechanical foot, lower-limb and low back problems is massively increased, from handicapping their normal foot functions with stiff shoes.

    Let alone the reduction in sensation from covering the skin and creating an artificial neuropathic gait.

    Etc, etc, etc

    Sadly, my medical colleagues in this TV programme are blinded by their cognitive biases.

    I used to be too.

  • Podiatrists only see people with foot problems, and never see the millions of people who go barefoot at home but never have any foot problems, so they have a biased view of the true situation.

  • Only do it in your own home, like in your living room,dining room,and TV room,never in your garage,undone basement, and in somebody else’s home.

  • Benefits of walking barefoot on the earth
    Research has shown barefoot contact with the earth can produce nearly instant changes in a variety of physiological measures, helping improve sleep, reduce pain, decrease muscle tension and lower stres

  • Well, given that we evolved over millions of years, to that exact shape, I’d sayy yes, it is natural… duh. XD
    The reason to wear shoes, or indeed clothes, is that we want to live in unnatural environments too. That’s acceptable. (The rest is us having become very soft and weak.)
    And I disagree about it not being doable in cities. It’s just a matter of keeping your eyes open and the city being not too dirty.

  • Going barefoot is gross on stupid hippies who cant make it in life with low pay jobs would think this ok. Lol hahaha lisers poor losers lol uneducated idoits lol

  • I walk barefoot in my house and garden every summer and have done for years.
    Don’t do it anywhere but in your house,garden or yard or the beach, not the park or street unless you like getting MRSA or something from doggie do.
    My floor boards are not modern pine ones so I can go barefoot on them because they are oak spring on joists and as for my bathroom floor that’s lino covered and I clean it, so another thing is if you’re in a old house like mine don’t lay modern plank boards on your lovely spring wooden floor or rip it up for hard tiling,etc then you can go barefoot in comfort.
    By the way it can’t cure arthritis but it is easier for me to walk with my problems in my own house.
    Also I think dance classes like I had when I was a child can help you much more with your balance than just going barefoot.☺️

  • Feets are weak because of cushions and heels. Go barefoot as much as possible, and you develop more strength. Use barefoot shoes when you need shoes ����