Child Safety Laws and regulations for Vehicle Seats and much more

 

Child Passenger Safety Tips and Guidelines

Video taken from the channel: Colorado Department of Transportation


 

New child safety seat law

Video taken from the channel: Community Medical Centers


 

CAR SEAT LAW

Video taken from the channel: KHON2 News


 

Car seat safety: Are Australian children safe?

Video taken from the channel: The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne


 

Car Seat Safety By Age: Infants in Rear-facing Seats (Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia)

Video taken from the channel: ChildPassengerSafety


 

Keeping children safe in crashes: Overview

Video taken from the channel: IIHS


 

Staying Safe in the Car: Booster Seats School Aged Children

Video taken from the channel: RWJBarnabas Health


Child passenger restraint laws that increase the age for car seat or booster seat use result in more children being buckled up. Among five states that increased the required car seat or booster seat age to 7 or 8 years, car seat and booster seat use tripled, and deaths and serious injuries decreased by 17%. To maximize safety, keep your child in the car seat for as long as possible, as long as the child fits within the manufacturer’s height and weight requirements.

Keep your child in the back seat at least through age 12. Recommended car seats based on your child’s age and size. Make sure children are always properly buckled in the back seat in a car seat, booster seat, or seat belt, whichever is appropriate for their weight, height, and age.

Install and use car seats and booster seats according to the seat owner’s manual. Children should remain in booster seats until they can safely use an adult seatbelt. Adult belts.

An adult belt may be used once the lap belt crosses the thighs and hips, the child’s knees bend over the edge of the seat, and the shoulder strap crosses the chest—not neck—of the child. A rear facing car seat shall not be used in the front seat of a vehicle. A child 8 or older and weighing 60 pounds or more shall be restrained by an appropriate child restraint or seat belt. Children 4 or younger weighing less than 40 pounds shall use an approved child restraint in a student transportation vehicle. Children less than 4 years old or 40 pounds must use a child safety seat meeting federal motor vehicle safety standards.

Children less than 8 years old, unless they are at least 4 feet, 9 inches tall must use a booster seat. Children ages 8-15 must use a child safety seat or safety belt. Children under 2 years of age shall ride in a rear-facing car seat unless the child weighs 40 or more pounds OR is 40 or more inches tall. The child shall be secured in a manner that complies with the height and weight limits specified by the manufacturer of the car seat. Children must be in a car seat until they reach age 4 and 40 pounds, and in a booster seat until they reach age 8, more than 80 pounds in weight, or more than 4 ft.

9 in. tall. Tiered structure applies: Less than 1 year old, or less than 20 lbs. must be in a rear-facing child seat in the back seat (if so equipped). Children age one (1) through age three (3), and weighing more than twenty (20) pounds, must be secured in a child safety seat in a forward facing position in the rear seat, if available, or according to the child safety restraint system or vehicle manufacturer’s instructions. Children less than 8 years old, unless they are at least 4 feet, 9 inches tall must use a booster seat.

Children ages 8-15 years must use a child safety seat or safety belt. Fines will range from a minimum of $25 to a maximum of $75 per occurrence. A booster seat can be purchased for as little as $15.

List of related literature:

However, with proper seating placement of the child within the car and usage of ageand size-appropriate car seats or booster seats, almost one-third of these deaths can be prevented, and injuries can be reduced by more than half (188–191).

“Brain Injury Medicine: Principles and Practice” by David B. Arciniegas, MD, M. Ross Bullock, MD, PHD, Douglas I. Katz, MD, Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, PHD, ABPP, Ross D. Zafonte, DO, Nathan D. Zasler, MD
from Brain Injury Medicine: Principles and Practice
by David B. Arciniegas, MD, M. Ross Bullock, MD, PHD, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2012

All fifty states have laws requiring that children under age four be properly restrained in a child safety seat when a car is in motion; more and more states are requiring that everyone riding in the front seat be buckled up, and that children who need them use booster seats.

“Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care, 9th Edition” by Benjamin Spock, M.D.
from Dr. Spock’s Baby and Child Care, 9th Edition
by Benjamin Spock, M.D.
Skyhorse, 2012

These laws also typically stipulate that the child can use a seatbelt assembly when they are 8 years of age; however, they are safer if they remain using the booster seat until they reach the intended height and weight, regardless of age.

“Assistive TechnologiesE-Book: Principles and Practice” by Albert M. Cook, Janice Miller Polgar, Pedro Encarnação
from Assistive TechnologiesE-Book: Principles and Practice
by Albert M. Cook, Janice Miller Polgar, Pedro Encarnação
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The law required children younger than age 4 to travel in an approved safety seat in the front seat of a vehicle or in either a safety seat or seatbelt in the back seat.

“Evidence-Based Public Health” by and Director of the Prevention Research Center Ross C. Brownson Professor of Epidemiology, Elizabeth A. Baker Associate Professor of Behavioral Science and Health Education, Terry L. Leet Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Missouri Kathleen N. Gillespie Associate Professor of Health Management and Policy All at St.Louis University School of Public Health
from Evidence-Based Public Health
by and Director of the Prevention Research Center Ross C. Brownson Professor of Epidemiology, Elizabeth A. Baker Associate Professor of Behavioral Science and Health Education, et. al.
Oxford University Press, USA, 2002

Age and size appropriate car seats and restraints are essential for child occupant safety.

“Rockwood and Wilkins' Fractures in Children” by James H. Beaty, Charles A. Rockwood, James R. Kasser
from Rockwood and Wilkins’ Fractures in Children
by James H. Beaty, Charles A. Rockwood, James R. Kasser
Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2010

For example, to decrease injuries in motor vehicle accidents for children after they are too big for baby car seats, the Atlantabased Health Law Partnership11 drafted state legislation to mandate that booster seats be used with seat belts for children under 8 years old.

“Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity” by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, Committee on Community-Based Solutions to Promote Health Equity in the United States, Alina Baciu, Yamrot Negussie, Amy Geller, James N. Weinstein
from Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity
by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2017

• Use federally approved car safety seats that fit the child’s size and weight (Fig. 52-4).

“Mosby's Textbook for Nursing Assistants E-Book” by Sheila A. Sorrentino, Leighann Remmert
from Mosby’s Textbook for Nursing Assistants E-Book
by Sheila A. Sorrentino, Leighann Remmert
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Ensure that all passengers have properly adjusted and fastened their safety belts, and that all children are secured in the appropriate child safety restraint (e.g., child safety seat or booster seat) and in compliance with state child-passenger safety laws.

“How to Drive: Driver Education Student Textbook15th Edition” by William E. Van Tassel, Ph.D.
from How to Drive: Driver Education Student Textbook15th Edition
by William E. Van Tassel, Ph.D.
AAA, 2020

Most states have laws that mandate use of safety seats until the child reaches 4 years of age or at least 40 pounds in weight.

“Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics E-Book: First South Asia Edition” by Karen Marcdante, Robert M. Kliegman, O P Misra, Shakuntala Prabhu, Surjit Singh
from Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics E-Book: First South Asia Edition
by Karen Marcdante, Robert M. Kliegman, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Convertible safety seats should be used until the child weighs at least 13.6 kg or more regardless of age and as long as the child fits properly into the seat (van Schaik & CPS, Injury Prevention Committee, 2008).

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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