Bed time Routines Which Help Children Sleep

 

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Whether your child is a beginning reader or a bookworm, you can read side-by-side or read to him from a good book for school-age kids. Dim the lights. Set the mood for sleep by turning off your child’s light and turning on a night light. Play soft music.

The solution: Make bedtime a priority. A predictable, calming bedtime routine is key to a good night’s sleep. Avoid active play and electronic devices, which are stimulating. You might give your child a bath and read stories.

Talk about the day. Play soothing bedtime music. Then tuck your child into bed drowsy but awake and say good night. Finally, Hall has an old-school suggestion for good back-to-school sleep routines: read a hard-cover book before bedtime. “If your children are younger, a. Make sure bedtime is realistic, if your child isn’t falling asleep until 11pm there is no point starting a routine at 6pm Dim the lights, close the curtains if needs be and create some darkness to help to promote the melatonin (sleep hormone) production Turn all.

“Parents should start now, by easing bedtime back at least 15 minutes earlier each night, and then waking the kids up 15 minutes earlier in the morning. Do this – even on the weekends – until the child’s schedule is aligned with how early they will need to wake up for the start of a school day.” Dr. Timothy Morgenthaler, AASM.

For example, if your child needs to be awake at 7am and needs 10 hours sleep per night, you then count back 10 hours and can see that bedtime should be 9pm, with the bedtime routine beginning an. A bedtime routine includes all of the things that you do with your baby or older child just before and up to the time that you put him to bed, such as taking a bath, the last diaper change, putting on pajamas, saying prayers, and reading a bedtime story, etc. After months of being home, staying up late and sleeping in, getting children up and ready on time for school may require more effort than it did last year, and one sleep expert suggests parents. A positive bedtime routine can calm and soothe your child in the 20 minutes or so before bed.

A bedtime routine involves doing similar activities in a similar way each night. These activities can include having a bath, brushing teeth and reading. At 5-11 years, children need 9-11 hours sleep a night. For example, if your child wakes for school at 7 am and needs approximately 10 hours sleep per night, your child should be in bed before 9 pm.

Some children fall deeply asleep very quickly when they go to bed.

List of related literature:

Routines can include a bath, massage, and other calming activities (see Figure 27-1A).151 Parents may move bedtime closer to the child’s naturally established time to fall asleep and then gradually move bedtime earlier and earlier until the child is able to fall asleep at the desired bedtime.

“Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents E-Book” by Jane Case-Smith, Jane Clifford O'Brien
from Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents E-Book
by Jane Case-Smith, Jane Clifford O’Brien
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

A nightly bedtime routine: Impact on sleep in young children and maternal mood.

“Handbook of Parenting and Child Development Across the Lifespan” by Matthew R. Sanders, Alina Morawska
from Handbook of Parenting and Child Development Across the Lifespan
by Matthew R. Sanders, Alina Morawska
Springer International Publishing, 2018

A bedtime routine (e.g. same hour for bedtime, snack or quiet activity) used consistently helps young children avoid delaying sleep.

“Potter & Perry's Fundamentals of Nursing AUS Version E-Book” by Jackie Crisp, Catherine Taylor, Clint Douglas, Geraldine Rebeiro
from Potter & Perry’s Fundamentals of Nursing AUS Version E-Book
by Jackie Crisp, Catherine Taylor, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

• Encourage parents to form good sleep routines for the child, to provide positive reinforcement of healthy sleep behavior, and to use firm, loving, and consistent discipline when dealing with sleep refusal and other behavioral sleep problems.

“Burns' Pediatric Primary Care E-Book” by Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks, Nancy Barber Starr, Margaret A. Brady, Nan M. Gaylord, Martha Driessnack, Karen Duderstadt
from Burns’ Pediatric Primary Care E-Book
by Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks, Nancy Barber Starr, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Bedtime routines can include stories, songs, prayers, hugs, and kisses.

“Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care, 9th Edition” by Benjamin Spock, M.D.
from Dr. Spock’s Baby and Child Care, 9th Edition
by Benjamin Spock, M.D.
Skyhorse, 2012

Bedtime routines typically take less than 20 min and include activities such as putting on pajamas, brushing teeth, reading a story, saying prayers or meditating together, and snuggling/giving kisses goodnight.

“Principle-Based Stepped Care and Brief Psychotherapy for Integrated Care Settings” by Alexandros Maragakis, William T. O'Donohue
from Principle-Based Stepped Care and Brief Psychotherapy for Integrated Care Settings
by Alexandros Maragakis, William T. O’Donohue
Springer International Publishing, 2018

A cool, quiet, dark sleep environment with no distraction such as a TV in the bedroom and a relaxing bedtime routine will help ensure that children get the rest they need.

“Child Development From Infancy to Adolescence: An Active Learning Approach” by Laura E. Levine, Joyce Munsch
from Child Development From Infancy to Adolescence: An Active Learning Approach
by Laura E. Levine, Joyce Munsch
SAGE Publications, 2014

Once the child is routinely falling asleep independently within 20–30 minutes of being placed in bed, bedtime is gradually faded earlier (about 15 minutes every couple of nights) until the original bedtime (or parents’ bedtime goal) is reached.

“Behavioral Treatments for Sleep Disorders: A Comprehensive Primer of Behavioral Sleep Medicine Interventions” by Michael L. Perlis, Mark Aloia, Brett Kuhn
from Behavioral Treatments for Sleep Disorders: A Comprehensive Primer of Behavioral Sleep Medicine Interventions
by Michael L. Perlis, Mark Aloia, Brett Kuhn
Elsevier Science, 2010

A bedtime routine should include calm and enjoyable activities, such as a bath and bedtime stories.

“A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Sleep: Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Problems” by Jodi A. Mindell, Judith A. Owens
from A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Sleep: Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Problems
by Jodi A. Mindell, Judith A. Owens
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

There is some evidence that daytime activities, such as a short time of exercise, will enhance sleep at night in children undergoing chemotherapy.28 Ongoing involvement at school, visits by friends, or the use of expressive therapies, such as play and music, can also help to keep children occupied during the day.

“Textbook of Interdisciplinary Pediatric Palliative Care E-Book: Expert Consult Premium Edition” by Joanne Wolfe, Pamela Hinds, Barbara Sourkes
from Textbook of Interdisciplinary Pediatric Palliative Care E-Book: Expert Consult Premium Edition
by Joanne Wolfe, Pamela Hinds, Barbara Sourkes
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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