7 Activities Your Son Or Daughter Can Perform Having a Concussion

 

Concussions: What is the treatment for a concussion? | Children’s National

Video taken from the channel: Children’s National Hospital


 

Monitoring and Managing Concussions Boston Children’s Hospital

Video taken from the channel: Boston Children’s Hospital


 

When can your child play again after concussion?

Video taken from the channel: Ohio State Wexner Medical Center


 

Q&A About Concussion Diagnosis and Evaluation The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (3 of 8)

Video taken from the channel: The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia


 

Getting Back in the Game A Faster Way to Concussion Recovery Explore UCalgary

Video taken from the channel: University of Calgary


 

Concussion/mTBI Planning and Pacing Activity: Using a timer

Video taken from the channel: St. Joseph’s Health Care London


 

How You Could Be Making Your Kid’s Concussion Worse | UCLA Health News

Video taken from the channel: UCLA Health


vision deficits (i.e., can’t look to the right or left) If no immediate signs are evident but you’re concerned that your child might have a concussion, watch for a cluster of symptoms, says Grady. A concussion can also be caused by a blow to the body that sends a force to the head, causing the brain to move within the skull. Your child can have a concussion even if they don’t pass out (lose consciousness). Your child’s doctor can diagnose a concussion based on the signs and symptoms. 7 Things Your Child With a Concussion Can Do While in Recovery.

Find mellow ways to keep busy, with no thinking required. Fun Activities For Kids Fun Crafts For Kids Crafts To Do Medical Questions Childrens Artwork Brain Injury Your Child Cool Kids. More information. Ask the provider when your child can return to their normal activities.

Make sure your child’s teacher, physical education teacher, coaches, and school nurse are aware of the recent injury. Talk to teachers about helping your child catch up on school work. Also ask about timing of tests or major projects.

Do not let your child play video games, read, watch TV, or use a computer. Your child can go back to school and do most daily activities when symptoms are completely gone. He or she will need to stop any activity that triggers symptoms or makes them worse. Do not allow your child to play sports until his or. If all concussion symptoms are gone, your child can go back to all activities, except sports.

For sports, your health care provider will work with your child’s coach and athletic trainer (if available) to create a clear, written plan for a gradual return to play. Concussion is a form of traumatic brain injury. Parents and caregivers should be aware of the warning signs and symptoms of concussion in children and toddlers. In this article, we look at the.

With their young minds still developing, kids with concussions need to take time-outs both mentally and physically to fully heal, new research shows. “After a concussion, kids need 3 to 5. They can also sustain a concussion due to a fall from a two-wheeler or when riding a tricycle or bicycle. As you may have noticed, simple, everyday activities can be a cause for concussion in babies.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends, as a safety measure, that you take your baby to a doctor. What to do if your child has had a concussion. If you suspect your child might have had a concussion or suffered a significant hit to the head, then they should not continue playing – sit them out.

You should get your child checked out by a doctor or clinician experienced in recognising concussion. Sometimes your child can look.

List of related literature:

These protocols often recommend rest for the child and avoidance of overstimulating activities (e.g., video games; no late nights) and athletic activities (e.g., soccer, bicycle riding) that can increase risk for additional head injury.

“Psychoeducational Assessment and Report Writing” by Stefan C. Dombrowski
from Psychoeducational Assessment and Report Writing
by Stefan C. Dombrowski
Springer New York, 2014

Let them know about the possible concussion and give them the HEADS UP fact sheet for parents.

“Critical Care Transport” by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), UMBC
from Critical Care Transport
by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), UMBC
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2017

Encourage parents to engage their children in quiet activities and to prevent any injuries to the child’s head (e.g., by having the child wear protective headgear and lining the crib with protective padding).

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong, Annette Baker, R.N., Patrick Barrera, Debbie Fraser Askin
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, et. al.
Mosby/Elsevier, 2013

The list of activities and sports with increased risk of head trauma include soccer, hockey, football, horseback riding, lacrosse, wrestling, skateboarding, cycling, playing on playgrounds, and falling.

“Peak: The New Science of Athletic Performance That is Revolutionizing Sports” by Marc Bubbs
from Peak: The New Science of Athletic Performance That is Revolutionizing Sports
by Marc Bubbs
Chelsea Green Publishing, 2019

To limit the duration of symptoms in children after concussions, rest (including the concept of cognitive rest) should be encouraged and strict return-to-activity guidelines should be followed.

“Netter's Pediatrics E-Book” by Todd Florin, Stephen Ludwig, MD, Paul L. Aronson, Heidi C. Werner
from Netter’s Pediatrics E-Book
by Todd Florin, Stephen Ludwig, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Teach about activity restrictions aimed at preventing bleeding and injury (no nose blowing, swimming, heavy lifting, strenuous exercise).

“Lewis's Medical-Surgical Nursing E-Book: Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems, Single Volume” by Mariann M. Harding, Jeffrey Kwong, Dottie Roberts, Debra Hagler, Courtney Reinisch
from Lewis’s Medical-Surgical Nursing E-Book: Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems, Single Volume
by Mariann M. Harding, Jeffrey Kwong, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Educate parents about high-risk sports (risk of spinal cord injury): contact sports (football, soccer), trampoline, or gymnastics.

“Family Nurse Practitioner Certification Intensive Review: Fast Facts and Practice Questions, Second Edition” by Maria T. Codina Leik, MSN, ARNP, FNP-C, AGPCNP-BC
from Family Nurse Practitioner Certification Intensive Review: Fast Facts and Practice Questions, Second Edition
by Maria T. Codina Leik, MSN, ARNP, FNP-C, AGPCNP-BC
Springer Publishing Company, 2013

Skull Injuries Head injuries in children are very common, especially in the toddler who is just learning to walk, run, and climb, and in the school-age child.

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, W. E. Jacott, M. G. Rosen, Robert B. Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, et. al.
Springer New York, 2013

Focus on injuries (such as accidental falls, poisoning, choking, concussion, fractures, or burns) because these may be potential areas for parental guidance.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition” by A. Judie
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition
by A. Judie
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Head injuries, fractures, and even significant soft tissue injuries should be considered distracting injuries in children.

“Emergency Medicine E-Book: Clinical Essentials (Expert Consult Online)” by James G. Adams
from Emergency Medicine E-Book: Clinical Essentials (Expert Consult Online)
by James G. Adams
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

2 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Please do not trust your health to UCLA! They are an awful hospital that was given an F rating for patient safety. After I was injured at the hospital, they refused to send me my medical records to try to cover their butts. There’s tons of incriminating evidence in my records and they were trying to cover it up. Including proof that a surgical device that was supposed to be part of my procedure was never installed. Also that the doctor knew my hardware was failing but he never told me, even after I complained of severe pain in the same location.