The Reason Why You Could Decide To not Pursue Fertility Treatment

 

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Not Wanting to Go Through the Emotional Stress. Fertility treatment can be extremely stressful, and stressors range from the emotional drain of waiting to see if you are pregnant, to the routine that must be meticulously followed, to the “hormones from hell” as some of the medications are popularly described. It is a big decision to go down this path, and there a few very valid reasons why you may decide not to. You have a range of options available to you right now, and one of them, just as valid as any other option, is the decision to not pursue fertility treatment.

Here a few reasons why: Money. Fertility treatment is expensive. Note also that becoming pregnant at a younger age (with or without fertility treatment) reduces your risk for chromosomal abnormalities.

Results. You are certainly worried about the result of fertility treatment. That may make some women fearful of.

If an egg ovulated from your ovaries can’t reach the uterus—and sperm can’t get to the egg—you can’t get pregnant. In some situations, surgical repair of the fallopian tubes can avoid the need for IVF. However, success rates vary considerably, and it’s not a good option for most women with severe tubal disease.

After a failed fertility treatment cycle, you have several options. You may decide to try again using the same treatment. You may choose to try again with a different treatment. Or you may decide not to pursue further treatment. The path that’s right for you will depend on your particular situation and what you have already tried.

You might then want to undertake these elements to find out what the issues may be, what will be involved and what the associated costs are for your individual circumstances. You can then leave it there, discuss the results and costs with another provider, or decide to leave it there if you decide not to pursue treatment. We will not qualify for any funding for IVF. We have decided not to pursue IVF as an option despite the fact that we would love to give our daughter a sibling.

The reasons are that we don’t have enough savings and would need to borrow to do IVF and the chances of success for us are very slim. I think if I had let my body take time, we might not have had to go through what we did (we ended up with #2 instantly with no fertility treatment). In a way, I wish we had tried the wait and see approach. Best of luck to whatever you choose.

Just remember, people are nosy and the questions won’t stop so be prepared. Psychological stress and emotional problems are common, especially if in vitro fertilization (IVF) is unsuccessful. IVF is expensive, and many insurance plans do not provide coverage for fertility treatment.

The cost for a single IVF cycle can range from at least $12,000-$17,000. What if I don’t produce healthy eggs or my husband is sterile?If you’re not in a large metropolitan area you may not have as many choices and may have to drive quite a distance for fertility treatment.

Wherever you live, you can try to find a fertility clinic that has early morning, evening or weekend hours so you don’t have to miss much time from work.

List of related literature:

Once a couple know that they risk having a child with a serious genetic disease they may choose to avoid doing so by various methods: they may choose not to have children; to use pre-natal testing with the intention of terminating affected pregnancies; to use donated sperm or eggs as relevant; to use IVF with PID.

“Autonomy and Trust in Bioethics” by Onora O'Neill
from Autonomy and Trust in Bioethics
by Onora O’Neill
Cambridge University Press, 2002

As recently stressed by a group of experts, androgens and drugs that increase ovarian androgens, such as letrozole, may become important adjuncts for patients with low prognosis IVF (174).

“Textbook of Assisted Reproductive Techniques Fourth Edition: Volume 2: Clinical Perspectives” by David K. Gardner, Ariel Weissman, Colin M Howles, Zeev Shoham
from Textbook of Assisted Reproductive Techniques Fourth Edition: Volume 2: Clinical Perspectives
by David K. Gardner, Ariel Weissman, et. al.
Taylor & Francis, 2012

The decision to recommend ART should be based on the likelihood that a pregnancy will occur without treatment, the possibility that a less invasive form of treatment might be effective and the likely outcome of IVF treatment (National Institute for Clinical Excellence 2004).

“Gynaecology E-Book: Expert Consult: Online and Print” by Robert W. Shaw, David Luesley, Ash K. Monga
from Gynaecology E-Book: Expert Consult: Online and Print
by Robert W. Shaw, David Luesley, Ash K. Monga
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

I had been told by more than one physician that I would not be able to have children, as I was not making any ‘follicles,’ even following a round of trying out the fertility drug Perganol.

“Iron Disorders Institute Guide to Hemochromatosis” by Cheryl Garrison
from Iron Disorders Institute Guide to Hemochromatosis
by Cheryl Garrison
Sourcebooks, Incorporated, 2009

Many infertile women agree to undergo procedures that are onerous and risky because they are convinced that this is necessary if they are to conceive (Bartholet 1993).

“The Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy” by Professor of Ethics and Religion Suzanne Holland, Ph.D., Suzanne Holland Karen Lebacqz Laurie Zoloth, Suzanne Holland, Karen Lebacqz, Laurie Zoloth, Ralph Erskine Conrad Memorial Fund, Professor of Medical Humanities Professor of Religious Studies Laurie Zoloth, PH.D., Arthur L Caplan
from The Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy
by Professor of Ethics and Religion Suzanne Holland, Ph.D., Suzanne Holland Karen Lebacqz Laurie Zoloth, et. al.
MIT Press, 2001

Although FP may initially concern cancer patients, there are many other medical conditions that may compromise fertility, such as endometriosis or high risk for early ovarian failure, where an intervention as safeguarding gametes for future use is required to uphold fertility potential.

“In Vitro Fertilization: A Textbook of Current and Emerging Methods and Devices” by Zsolt Peter Nagy, Alex C. Varghese, Ashok Agarwal
from In Vitro Fertilization: A Textbook of Current and Emerging Methods and Devices
by Zsolt Peter Nagy, Alex C. Varghese, Ashok Agarwal
Springer International Publishing, 2019

Research on DHEA has focused on these particular patients because this type of infertility is incredibly difficult to treat, and DHEA appears to get at the core of the problem by increasing the number of eggs produced in an IVF cycle.

“It Starts with the Egg: How the Science of Egg Quality Can Help You Get Pregnant Naturally, Prevent Miscarriage, and Improve Your Odds in IVF (Second Edition)” by Rebecca Fett
from It Starts with the Egg: How the Science of Egg Quality Can Help You Get Pregnant Naturally, Prevent Miscarriage, and Improve Your Odds in IVF (Second Edition)
by Rebecca Fett
Franklin Fox Publishing LLC, 2019

Most fertility specialists are conscientious in counseling their patients about the risks and limitations of fertility treatment, but these physicians are reticent to deny a woman treatment if she is willing to assume the risks of the treatment.

“Medical Care Law” by Edward P. Richards, Katharine C. Rathbun
from Medical Care Law
by Edward P. Richards, Katharine C. Rathbun
Aspen Publishers, 1999

IVF can also be used with oocyte donation, for instance, where the woman has ovarian dysfunction (such as premature menopause or Turner syndrome) or has a high risk of transmitting an inherited disorder as in vitro culture of the embryo permits preimplantation diagnosis (see Chapter 7).

“Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book” by Jane Coad, Kevin Pedley, Melvyn Dunstall
from Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book
by Jane Coad, Kevin Pedley, Melvyn Dunstall
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Medical treatments do not improve fertility rates as many treatment options are contraceptive in themselves and should not be used if women wish to try to conceive.

“Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics E-Book” by Cate Whittlesea, Karen Hodson
from Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics E-Book
by Cate Whittlesea, Karen Hodson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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24 comments

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  • Hi Dr. I first want to thank you for these videos.I am 30yrs old and suffer from unexplained infertility and after 7yrs and 2 miscarriages I finally conceived my now 3yr old. My husband and I have been trying for #2 for 2yrs now and still no luck. Watching these videos have been life changing give me hope that one day I can conceive again and have a healthy pregnancy. Due to finances I cannot do treatment but I look forward to watching your videos evey chance I get. Thank you for your valuable knowledge.

  • Im 33 and my AMH is 0.8 but the hsg is ok.My husband has a low quality of the sperm.Our doctor said out best chance is IVF.I’m taking vit.D and folic acid.What can I do more?We cant afford IVF��

  • watching from Holland i did check everything doc. the last one was this 21 of Jan, the xray for my falloptian tube but result are we are fine but still cant get pregnant. now im waiting till feb 9 for another appointment. me and my partner trying for 1 year and 6months now. i hope can get pregnant soon in Gods will������������������������

  • I’m almost 18, but I have some serious baby fever. I don’t want to be in my late 20s or early 30s when I have a kid. I’m hoping to maybe have a baby at 18 or 19. I’m not planning on being in a relationship, so what age do I have to be to be eligible for something like artificial insemination or IVF?

  • Wow, so nice and helpful. Just came across. Your very thorough and to the point. I’ll be seeing my OB in few weeks and will ask if I can take an AMH test. Are there questions I should pose as to their testing methods?
    You said there is no way to increase AMH, but is there way to preserve what you got longer?
    Also, what if you’re not a regular smoker but you smoked for about 3-4months straight at some point… is that a permanent damage or can your body/ovaries recover if you stopped completely?
    What other tests should we ask for at OB that will help give a state of our ovaries?

    Btw I also see you make an effort to answer each question which is comforting as you’re actually reading the comments….
    thank you ���� for doing this!
    Where are you located?
    Do you believe in food affecting the health state of our ovaries? Are there things we should or shouldn’t eat to maintain healthy ovaries?

  • Hi Doc! I’m really interested in this procedure. How can I request this with my current RE without offending her or sounding like a madman?

  • Hlo sir.ma amh level 7.86.Prolctn.15.99.my age29.my prblm pelvic FAC tr.2ivf fail. Qualtyembrys.but fail.now Dr sgst clipping tubes.agains do ivf.what happnd sir

  • Had endometriosis surgery to remove, and also removed left tube in October. Would this procedure be good for me?
    My blood tests: vitamin d is 121, dhea: 62, tsh: 0.80. Ovulating on day 14 of cycle, typical cycle of 23 days ( to 27days)… please advise. Thank you! Also I have frozen eggs from years ago (16 mature eggs) and looking to first try naturally or IVF if doesn’t work… my job pays for it all… so weighing out my options. If doesn’t work naturally.

  • Hello sir, I am 33 yr old and my AMH is 10.60 and my doctor is saying that only IUI OR IVF is the option to get pragnant….. please suggest me truly I will be thankful to you..

  • Hi
    I have had abortion last year in sep due to leakage of amniotic fluid…
    And then in November I have 2 ovarian cyst. I take medicine for 5 month bt cyst is still there.
    Then we test for amh. My amb is also low 1.7. Dr. suggest me for IVF. Bt I want to conceive naturally.
    Now I take ovares plus & dailyfol.
    Please suggest me what should I do.

  • I love your videos because you educate us and aim to help us decipher what is the truth. There are too many on YouTube who give bad advice and are not scientifically proven.

  • I have low amh. I have already recovered from an eating disorder binge purge type and lost my period for 4 years. though i am physically restored, mentally not. Im doing fertility treatment and im on my 2 week wait for IUI. Sometimes i still purged twice a week. Is there a connection with having ak ED and low AMH.

  • Hello sir…in March 2019 my amh was 3.40 but in July 2020 it reduces to 0.99.Please tell me can i can get pregnant naturally with this amh or should I go for further treatment.My age is 31years.

  • What are the chances of conception on the first attempt through IVF with PCOS and adhesions?
    Does Laparoscopy permanently clear tubal adhesions?

  • Hi I am 27 to with PCOS, my AMH levels are High 21.42, I know it is common with pcos, is there anything that can be done? I am trying to conceive. Thanks!

  • I have had three missed miscarriages too chormsomes issues and my doctor said i have a low amh level is 7.4 low for a 24 year old please help me out

  • I’m 32, had my first child at by C-section I later found out at 28 that I have endometriosis which is causing me to have imbalance hormones and irregular periods what can I do to get pregnant

  • I’m 36. My AMH is 0.2 my FSH levels are high and I haven’t had a period for nearly a year. We are saving for appointments but what can I do in the meantime? Kind regards

  • Gm sir I had left tube ectopic pregnancy before 10 months methotextre given to me after 10 month I m again pregnent with right tubal pregnancy what should I take decision for future how can i conceive I m really very worried I dnt have baby my age is 33 plz help nd guide me

  • The IVF-LUBE trial – a randomized trial to assess Lipiodol® uterine bathing effect in women with endometriosis or repeat implantation failure undergoing IVF. disagree with the finding DR. confused

  • Is there any way to reduce number of immature eggs during IVF egg collection? Let’s say good number of eggs collected after stimulation but 70% of them are immature…

  • My husband is now 16 million per milliliter 25% motility ok morphology. He got his hormones tested he’s all normal normal testosterone levels, LH, fsh, thyroid no vericolce too! Can his unhealthy lifestyle cure it? Like if he quits drinking 20 cups of coffee a day start exercising sleeping better?? I’m so worried

  • Hi my husband sperm morphology is less then 4% in first examination it was 3 and in second examination it comes 2! What ivf treatment is best for us?

  • My doctor said my husband sperm can’t fertilize my eggs another Doctor said his sperm percentage is not enough to get me pregnant…he has 97%