New Study Raises Worry About Antidepressant Use While Pregnant

 

Study looks at possible effect of anti-depressants during pregnancy

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Antidepressant use in pregnancy: minimal risk

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Study finds antidepressants during pregnancy do not cause autism

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Antidepressant Safety During Pregnancy: Autism, IQ, and Teratogenicity

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Antidepressant use during pregnancy linked to autism: study

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Cases of depression among pregnant women are on the rise, and antidepressants are an effective way to manage symptoms. A recent study found that medium to high doses of antidepressant medication taken during pregnancy may pose a risk to the health of the fetus. Experts recommend taking the lowest effective dose of antidepressant medication while pregnant.

New Study Raises Concern About Use Of Antidepressant During Pregnancy Motherhood In-Style Magazine. Depression in pregnancy, known as antepartum depression, is all too common. A new study conducted by the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology found that the rate of depression among women who arrive at the hospital to. About Us. Concern about antidepressant use has stemmed from the fact that the medications can cross the placenta and get into the brain of a fetus, potentially affecting future development, Vigod said. Maternal depression is considered a risk factor for developmental disorders, like autism and ADHD.

The choice to take antidepressant medication during pregnancy can be difficult. A new study led by. In this cohort of 3 789 330 pregnancies in the Medicaid program from 46 US states and the District of Columbia, of which 128 950 were exposed to antidepressants late in pregnancy, after control for depression and other potential confounding factors, we found that SSRI exposure in late pregnancy may be associated with an increase in the risk of PPHN, but the magnitude of that risk is smaller than previous studies.

Human studies concerning the adverse effects of antidepressant exposure during gestation on the developing fetus have showed increased risk of various congenital malformations such as cardiac, musculoskeletal, respiratory, craniosynostosis and craniofacial, 5–10 but variations between study results remain. 11–15 Underlying maternal depression, unaccounted potential confounders, class effect compared with antidepressant. Table 5 ⇓ shows the associations between antidepressant use and autism spectrum disorder. Any antidepressant use during pregnancy in mothers of cases was 1.3% compared with 0.6% of controls equating to an almost twofold increase in risk of autism spectrum disorder (1.90, 1.15 to 3.14). The large observational study, led by Anick Bérard, Ph.D., professor of perinatal epidemiology at the University of Montreal, found that taking antidepressants — particularly selective serotonin.

Women who take antidepressants during pregnancy may be unknowingly predisposing their infants to type 2 diabetes and obesity later in life, according to new research from McMaster University. The. The study, published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics, finds women who took SSRIs during pregnancy increased their child’s risk for autism by as much as 87.

List of related literature:

Antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are frequently prescribed during pregnancy for women with depression and anxiety.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Antidepressants, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are being prescribed more often in pregnancy for women with depression and anxiety.

“Maternal-Child Nursing E-Book” by Emily Slone McKinney, Susan R. James, Sharon Smith Murray, Kristine Nelson, Jean Ashwill
from Maternal-Child Nursing E-Book
by Emily Slone McKinney, Susan R. James, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Pregnant women are sometimes reluctant to use or be prescribed antidepressant medication during pregnancy due to concerns about potential side effects [24] and therefore seek out alternative therapies to alleviate depressive symptoms, which may include physical activity.

“Exercise and Sporting Activity During Pregnancy: Evidence-Based Guidelines” by Rita Santos-Rocha
from Exercise and Sporting Activity During Pregnancy: Evidence-Based Guidelines
by Rita Santos-Rocha
Springer International Publishing, 2018

Use of antidepressant medications during pregnancy: a multisite study.

“Side Effects of Drugs Annual: A Worldwide Yearly Survey of New Data in Adverse Drug Reactions” by Sidhartha D. Ray
from Side Effects of Drugs Annual: A Worldwide Yearly Survey of New Data in Adverse Drug Reactions
by Sidhartha D. Ray
Elsevier Science, 2017

Although data accumulated over the last 30 years suggest that some antidepressants may be used safely during pregnancy, information regarding the full spectrum and relative severity of attendant risks of pre-natal exposure to psychotropic medications is still incomplete.

“Massachusetts General Hospital Comprehensive Clinical Psychiatry E-Book” by Theodore A. Stern, Maurizio Fava, Timothy E. Wilens, Jerrold F. Rosenbaum
from Massachusetts General Hospital Comprehensive Clinical Psychiatry E-Book
by Theodore A. Stern, Maurizio Fava, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Most antidepressant medications currently prescribed during pregnancy are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

“Avery's Diseases of the Newborn E-Book” by Christine A. Gleason, Sherin Devaskar
from Avery’s Diseases of the Newborn E-Book
by Christine A. Gleason, Sherin Devaskar
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Antidepressants Antidepressants such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are being prescribed more often in pregnancy for women with depression and anxiety.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing” by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing
by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Few drugs have been studied for use during pregnancy as much as antidepressants, especially the most commonly prescribed ones, SSRIs.

“The Informed Parent: A Science-Based Resource for Your Child's First Four Years” by Tara Haelle, Emily Willingham, Ph.D.
from The Informed Parent: A Science-Based Resource for Your Child’s First Four Years
by Tara Haelle, Emily Willingham, Ph.D.
Penguin Publishing Group, 2016

Antidepressant use during pregnancy

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Increased use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants to manage mood disorders during pregnancy highlights the role psychotropic medication exposure during critical prenatal periods has in shaping children’s development.

“Parental Stress and Early Child Development: Adaptive and Maladaptive Outcomes” by Kirby Deater-Deckard, Robin Panneton
from Parental Stress and Early Child Development: Adaptive and Maladaptive Outcomes
by Kirby Deater-Deckard, Robin Panneton
Springer International Publishing, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • So it seems like the risk is very lightly increased and could also be due to a lot of other factors related to depression (More anxiety, less healthy habits: smoking, alcohol, sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy diet, etc)