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Male fertility does change with age. You might get the impression that age only matters in female fertility. While the change in fertility is more drastic in women, men have biological clocks, too.

While men don’t see a dramatic shift in fertility with age, there are many men over 45 who have medical conditions that affect fertility. As men get older, other health issues develop such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and high blood pressure. Effects of Age on Male Fertility Whereas most women realize that their biological clock ticks as they age, the same cannot be said for men. “Not only are men not aware of the impact their age. As men age, they may experience fertility complications as a result of problems with libido (sexual drive) and/or erectile dysfunction.

Also, they may see a decline in fertility as a result of common changes to an older male, such as increased weight, which negatively impact fertility. Although men don’t have a complete end to their natural fertility around age 50 (as women experience when they go through menopause), men’s fertility declines dramatically as they age, much like women’s fertility does. For example, researchers looked at a large group of couples with a female partner under 25 years old.

While less is known about male fertility and age, there is evidence that the older a man becomes, the more his fertility diminishes. 1  You can’t change your age, but you can arm yourself with the knowledge to improve your chances of successfully having a family. Aging and Male Fertility. Semen volume and sperm motility declines between 20-80 years of age.

The risk of miscarriage was 27% more likely in women whose partners were over 40 years of age. And men’s age affects much more than female fertility. As a man gets olde.

Age and sperm. Men younger than 40 have a better chance of fathering a child than those older than 40. The quality of the sperm men produce seems to decline as they get older. Most men make millions of new sperm every day, but men older than 40 have fewer healthy sperm than younger men.

Researchers say sperm count and lifestyle factors can lead to declining sperm quality in men over the age of 50. For women, menopause is a signal. Fibroids, endometriosis, and tubal disease are more common and can affect fertility.

Women who become pregnant at an older age have a higher risk of complications during the pregnancy, such as gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. How does age affect a man’s ability to produce a pregnancy?

List of related literature:

However, because there is little or no overall measurable decline in male fertility before age 45–50, the available data indicate that male factors likely contribute relatively little to the overall age-related decline in fertility.

“Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility” by Leon Speroff, Marc A. Fritz
from Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility
by Leon Speroff, Marc A. Fritz
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2005

However, because there is little or no overall measurable decline in male fertility before age 45–50, the available data suggest that male factors likely contribute relatively little to the overall age-related decline in fertility in women.

“Speroff's Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility” by Hugh S. Taylor, Lubna Pal, Emre Sell
from Speroff’s Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility
by Hugh S. Taylor, Lubna Pal, Emre Sell
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2019

However, sperm quality can deteriorate as men get older which, along with a decrease in sexual activity, is thought to be responsible for reduced fertility in men over the age of 40 years (13).

“Oxford Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology” by Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, William Ledger, Stergios Doumouchtsis, Lynette Denny
from Oxford Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
by Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, William Ledger, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2019

Only one study by Mathieu et al. (1995) adjusted for duration of infertility and irregular ovulation; Mathieu et al. found that after stratifying men into cohorts of age 35 or greater and less than age 30, there was a 60% decrease in the chance of initiating a pregnancy for the older men.

“Handbook of Models for Human Aging” by P. Michael Conn
from Handbook of Models for Human Aging
by P. Michael Conn
Elsevier Science, 2011

Although fertility in men does appear to decline as age increases, the effects of age are much less distinct.

“Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility” by Marc A. Fritz, Leon Speroff
from Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility
by Marc A. Fritz, Leon Speroff
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011

Certain medical conditions, including obesity, diabetes, and thyroid disease, can reduce a man’s fertility, and a gradual decline in fertility often occurs after age 35.

“Human Reproductive Biology” by Richard E. Jones, Kristin H Lopez
from Human Reproductive Biology
by Richard E. Jones, Kristin H Lopez
Elsevier Science, 2013

There is evidence that with increasing age in men, there is associated delayed conception, although a direct correlation between age and fecundity has not been strongly established.

“Infertility Counseling: A Comprehensive Handbook for Clinicians” by Sharon N. Covington, Linda Hammer Burns
from Infertility Counseling: A Comprehensive Handbook for Clinicians
by Sharon N. Covington, Linda Hammer Burns
Cambridge University Press, 2006

We know that fertility rates naturally decline in men and women with increasing age, beginning as early as 30 and then decreasing more quickly after age 40—fewer than 10% of women in their early 20s have infertility issues, whereas 30% of women in their 40s do (Chavarro et al., 2007b).

“Sexuality Now: Embracing Diversity” by Janell L. Carroll
from Sexuality Now: Embracing Diversity
by Janell L. Carroll
Cengage Learning, 2012

Although men maintain their fertility much longer than women do, increasing evidence is showing that later-in-life fatherhood carries a slightly higher risk for their children of birth defects and death before 5 years of age (Rubin, 2014; Urhojet al., 2014).

“Our Sexuality” by Robert L. Crooks, Karla Baur
from Our Sexuality
by Robert L. Crooks, Karla Baur
Cengage Learning, 2016

Age over 40 in a dad, on the other hand, can slightly increase the risk of miscarriage (chromosomal abnormalities are somewhat more likely in an older man’s sperm).

“What to Expect Before You're Expecting” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What to Expect Before You’re Expecting
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Workman Publishing Company, 2009

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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9 comments

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  • While the effects of female age on fertility have been known for a long time. More recent studies have found that the age of the male partner also affects the chance of pregnancy and pregnancy health. Male fertility generally starts to decline around age 40–45 years when sperm quality decreases. Increasing male age reduces the overall chances of pregnancy and increases time to pregnancy. The number of menstrual cycles it takes to become pregnant) and the risk of miscarriage and fetal death.  Children of older fathers also have an increased risk of mental health problems (although this is still rare). Children of fathers aged 40 or over are five times more likely to develop an autism spectrum disorder than children of fathers aged 30 or less. They also have a slightly increased risk of developing schizophrenia and other mental health disorders later in life. My husband had a similar issue. Rill when he went to see out gynecologist in Bio tex clinic and was given appropriate medications.

  • Stupid sexist study

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3253726/ This along with plenty of other sources do indicate that age DOES in fact affect male fertility.

  • Hii sir my age is 25 and my husbands age is 50 and naw we are wanting to baby so plz tell that can be possible in age difference of 25 years to both

  • My husband is 46. I’m much younger. He wants kids so bad. We’ve been trying but nothing yet. Hope we succeed because I know he always wanted a family.

  • Male fertility does change with age. You might get the impression that age only matters in female fertility. While the change in fertility is more drastic in women, men have biological clocks, too. For women aged 19 to 26, they had a 50 percent chance of getting pregnant on their own fertile day. Women age 35 to 39 had only a 29 percent chance. However, what’s most interesting here is the impact male age had. For the women age 35 to 39, if the man was five or more years older than the woman, their pregnancy success odds dropped to 15 percent. The odds pretty much were cut in half. A man’s age does matter. Men may not have a complete drop off in fertility like women do. But “advanced paternal age” is something couples should be aware of. Both men and women must contend with their biological clocks. Down syndrome isn’t the only risk that increases with paternal age. Older fathers are more likely to have children with autism, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, achondroplasia, a kind of dwarfism and childhood leukemia. But my husband who is 50 and I 45 managed to have a healthy baby via surrogacy in Bio tex clinic.

  • Hmmm, so how would you explain Charlie Chaplin fathering a child at 73, and Jeff Goldblum fathering in his 60s, your credibility is very doubtful

  • Lovely Video clip! Forgive me for chiming in, I am interested in your opinion. Have you heard about Taparton Silent Noise Takeover (should be on google have a look)? It is an awesome one of a kind product for learning the secret to get pregnant naturally without the normal expense. Ive heard some incredible things about it and my best friend Jordan after a lifetime of fighting got excellent results with it.

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  • I would certainly never encourage anyone to have kids before they’re ready. However, if you would like to have kids in the future, it’s important to have all of the information so that you can plan. We don’t want anyone to falsely believe that age doesn’t matter for men’s fertility, only to find that having a child is more difficult than they thought that it would be. If you’d like to have kids, make sure you consider the impact of aging on both partners when planning. Sperm also have a greater chance of genetic abnormalities in older men. This is why the likelihood of genetic disorders rises in children born to older men. It’s also why, even after an egg is fertilized, the incidence of miscarriage is higher when the father is older. Genetic changes in the sperm can affect the embryo’s ability to grow and develop properly. Reproductive technology does not change the genetic makeup of sperm, although technicians can select the healthiest embryos for transfer into the uterus to maximize the chances of a healthy baby. Just like my case with my husband before our medical journey in Bio tex clinic.