7 Items to Know Before The First Appointment Having a Fertility Physician

 

First Appointment with a Fertility Specialist | Questions to ask a Reproductive Endocrinologist

Video taken from the channel: Let’s Make Lemonade


 

What to Expect When Meeting a Fertility Doctor?

Video taken from the channel: City Fertility


 

How to Get the Most Out of Your First Visit With a Fertility Doctor

Video taken from the channel: Egg Whisperer Show


 

The First Appointment with a Fertility Doctor: What you Need to Know

Video taken from the channel: City Fertility


 

First appointment with a Fertility Specialist | Reproductive Endocrinologist

Video taken from the channel: ItsKelsiesLife


 

My First Appointment with a Fertility Specialist | Let’s Talk IBD

Video taken from the channel: LetsTalkIBD


 

First Fertility Specialist Appointment | How To Prepare

Video taken from the channel: ItsKelsiesLife


Much of the first appointment will be spent with the fertility doctor reviewing your medical history and discussing the possibility of male-factor problems. The reproductive endocrinologist may ask you to get blood tests or have a pelvic exam, and may also prescribe tests for the male partner. Once the wand is inserted, the doctor can get a good look at your uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, cervix, and general pelvic area through images projected on a screen.

There’s usually a larger screen, too, which you can look at. At this first fertility appointment, a doctor is usually looking at the number of follicles. Before your doctor can suggest a treatment plan, they need to know what they’re working with. There are a variety of tests for both male and female partners that REs will recommend so they can start trying to determine the root cause of your fertility issues.

Do your research about your doctor. Check reviews, forums, and ask questions over the phone. If you are plus-size, check before your appointment if there are any BMI restrictions at the clinic you are interested in going to. Ask for initial consultation pricing and if the office. You can streamline this process by authorizing and arranging for each office to fax your records to the fertility clinic ahead of your visit.

Your primary care physician; Your OBGYN; Any previous fertility evaluations or treatments; A list of questions for your doctor. It is a very good idea to have your questions written down or printed out before you go into the visit. Your fertility team will be asking you. This is a good time to see your doctor for a fertility checkup.

The doctor will ask about your sexual history and do a physical exam. Your doctor may also want to order some tests. Before your doctor visit, you’ll want to know some basic facts on infertilit. Your entire first appointment will probably last at least an hour to an hour and a half, including filling out the paperwork and your consultation. Here are some questions to ask the fertility doctor.

You will probably have more, but these will help you understand the next steps from your visit and what the likely effects will be. Confirm your appointment shortly before you go (the day before or a couple of hours before). Beforehand, make a list of questions you would like to ask the doctor. Take notes when with the doctor.

Take someone else with you, such as your husband or a friend. Four ears hear more than two. Make sure you know the exact dates of your last menstrual. As a result, making that first appointment to see an infertility doctor often seems like a gigantic leap. If you’re contemplating taking this step, it might be comforting to know the things that would likely occur at your first visit.

10 Questions To Ask Before Your First Fertility Clinic Appointment. There are a lot of different factors to consider before you decide on the location that works for you. Although your family doctor will be able to recommend and refer you to a clinic, it is worth doing some research on your own and checking for real-life reviews of the.

List of related literature:

Each woman will have different requirements, which may include advice on future fertility prospects, fertility control, symptoms of hirsutism, delayed secondary sexual development, risk of osteoporosis and endometrial protection from unopposed oestrogen action.

“Gynaecology E-Book: Expert Consult: Online and Print” by Robert W. Shaw, David Luesley, Ash K. Monga
from Gynaecology E-Book: Expert Consult: Online and Print
by Robert W. Shaw, David Luesley, Ash K. Monga
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Using that feedback, I expanded and revised the entire book, including the sections on fertility awareness method, natural progesterone, PCOS, and endometriosis.

“Period Repair Manual: Natural Treatment for Better Hormones and Better Periods” by Lara Briden
from Period Repair Manual: Natural Treatment for Better Hormones and Better Periods
by Lara Briden
Lara Briden, 2017

In Chapter 11, I talked about fertility awareness and the book Taking Charge of Your Fertility: The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health by Toni Weschler, MPH (see Appendix A).

“Balance Your Hormones, Balance Your Life: Achieving Optimal Health and Wellness through Ayurveda, Chinese Medicine, and Western Science” by Claudia Welch
from Balance Your Hormones, Balance Your Life: Achieving Optimal Health and Wellness through Ayurveda, Chinese Medicine, and Western Science
by Claudia Welch
Hachette Books, 2011

I did lots of research into fertility foods and the things that you should cut out and tried to follow them as best I could.

“Ask Me His Name: Learning to live and laugh again after the loss of my baby” by Elle Wright
from Ask Me His Name: Learning to live and laugh again after the loss of my baby
by Elle Wright
Blink Publishing, 2018

Read up on fertility screenings, as well as on the most common fertility treatments, so you’ll start the process with some idea of what you can expect.

“What to Expect: Before You're Expecting” by Sharon Mazel, Heidi Murkoff
from What to Expect: Before You’re Expecting
by Sharon Mazel, Heidi Murkoff
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

“Have you taken any medications to promote fertility?”

“Textbook of Physical Diagnosis E-Book: History and Examination” by Mark H. Swartz
from Textbook of Physical Diagnosis E-Book: History and Examination
by Mark H. Swartz
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Then comes the heart of the book: a guide to determining your specific fertility type.

“Making Babies: A Proven 3-Month Program for Maximum Fertility” by Jill Blakeway, Sami S. David
from Making Babies: A Proven 3-Month Program for Maximum Fertility
by Jill Blakeway, Sami S. David
Little, Brown, 2009

I started seeing a fertility specialist on the NHS who advised me to keep a detailed diary of my cycle, and told me the best times to try to conceive.

“Confessions of a Good Girl: My Story” by Andrea McLean
from Confessions of a Good Girl: My Story
by Andrea McLean
Pan Macmillan, 2012

For the woman, doctors will check to see whether she is ovulating by doing blood tests and an ultrasound of the ovaries.

“Encyclopedia of Family Health” by Martha Craft-Rosenberg, Shelley-Rae Pehler
from Encyclopedia of Family Health
by Martha Craft-Rosenberg, Shelley-Rae Pehler
SAGE Publications, 2011

Like most of my patients going through IVF, what you’ll really want to know now is what you can do to enhance your chances of conceiving while using fertility medicine.

“The Baby-Making Bible: Simple steps to enhance your fertility and improve your chances of getting pregnant” by Emma Cannon
from The Baby-Making Bible: Simple steps to enhance your fertility and improve your chances of getting pregnant
by Emma Cannon
Pan Macmillan, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

12 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • I could not agree more with everything you said in this video! I am in a few ivf support groups and what you say here is exactly what I say when people say ‘what should I ask at my consult?’

  • Hi Kelsie, This video was so great! We have our first fertility specialist appointment tomorrow. I have been a ball of nerves and this has given me some insight on what to expect. Thank you!

  • How much of your colon do you have left, if you don’t mind me asking? I have my sigmoid and rectum left, which are the two areas that are the worst for me, so I understand how frustrating it can be to still get flare-ups, despite having the ileostomy (which often causes its own issues).

    Also, I struggle with bad hormonal issues too. It makes dealing with all of this so much harder. I hope you find a solution that brings you healing and health. ��

  • Hi Maggie, I just wanted to give you a little encouragement by telling you about my daughter’s experience. She used to suffer terribly with PMT & was eventually put on “ the pill”, which she still takes even now. It is a progesterone only pill called Cerazette. The good news is that it worked for her & she was able to have five beautiful boys in between times. Their ages are 20,18,15,13 & 4. You can still have a happy ending. I know everybody’s circumstances are different but it could happen for you too. Wishing you & Zack all the very best from Kit. XX.

  • Even if the cause of your symptoms is something like endo or adenomyosis, birth control (a silly slang term for medication that treats a wide variety of medical conditions) is usually the first-line treatment anyway. Also, the PMDD would indicate at least part (if not all) of the problem is indeed hormonal. Keep in mind that the first form of birth control you try may not work, so don’t be discouraged as there are so many to try out there and how you feel on one type is no indication of how you’ll do on another type. Also, I went through a period of unbalanced hormones like this and it eventually went away because your hormones naturally fluctuate as you age (I switched birth control in the meantime to mitigate the symptoms). For me it occurred when was in my mid-twenties and it lasted maybe 18 months. So, if you are on birth control for a year, you won’t necessarily experience the same symptoms again when you get off of it.

  • This is extremely helpful and perfect timing!! My husband and I have our first fertility specialist appointment tomorrow afternoon after struggling to get pregnant for 2 years, then suffering 3 miscarriages in a row. I’m so nervous

  • Thank you so much Kelsie! My first fertility appointment is next week, very nervous! I have been blessed with 2 children. I suffer from secondary infertility, and had trouble getting pregnant with my second, I got pregnant the 3rd time 2 months shy of 3 years of trying and sadly ended in miscarriage at almost 12 weeks. Here’s to fighting for our rainbow baby!

  • So excited for you! I myself have been struggling and had 2 miscarriages in 2015. Still very hopeful. Ik things will work out for both of us with Gods help! ��

  • I am also having a horrible time around my period. My crohns symptoms are horrible, I’m moody, emotional. I was put on birth control that stops your periods but it made me so nauseated and just feel awful. So now I’m back to the drawing board. �� I hope it helps you.

  • I have endometriosis and after my surgery I was put on continuous birth control and it has improved my quality of life so much!! Everyone is different but I had a positive experience with it

  • Thank you for doing this video. I initially didn’t watch it but today I actually scheduled an appointment for next month with a reproductive endocrinologist. Wish me luck

  • I HIGHLY recommend the book ‘Period Power’ by Maisie Hill. So so informative about menstrual cycles, fertility and hormones. It’s on audible as well as printed