Your Teen’s To Private Reproductive and Reproductive Health Care

 

Sexual and Reproductive Health

Video taken from the channel: Able South Carolina


 

Women’s sexual and reproductive health (video)

Video taken from the channel: Better Health Channel


 

Teen Reproductive Health | Parenting Resources

Video taken from the channel: St. Louis Children’s Hospital


 

Pssst! Sexual Health Services for Teens

Video taken from the channel: morethanjustsex


 

Let’s Talk About Sexual Health

Video taken from the channel: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


 

Adolescent health and the importance of sexuality education

Video taken from the channel: World Health Organization (WHO)


 

Accessing Sexual Health Care for Minors

Video taken from the channel: AMAZE Org


Confidential sexual and reproductive healthcare for teens isn’t meant to keep parents in the dark. It is, however, meant to give teens access to vital healthcare. Without it, many sexually transmitted infections may go untreated and many teens may lack access to birth control. Confidentiality extends beyond reproductive health for minors.

If you’re a teen in California, you have rights. And that’s what this section is about your legal right to accessing sexual and reproductive health care. As a teen you have the right to confidential and affordable health care. Birth Control (Including Emergency Contraception) Testing + Treatment for STDs; Pregnancy Testing + Prenatal Care. By law, Title X family planning clinics must offer private and confidential services for teens Confidential services means your health information cannot be shared with anyone without your permission, unless your health care provider is concerned that you might hurt yourself or someone else.

Learn more about teens’ rights in your state. Laws developed over the past half century have significantly improved adolescents’ access to essential sexual and reproductive health care. These laws allow many adolescent minors to give their own consent, protect confidentiality, and provide financial support for the care.

If the minor could have consented to the care on his or her own under the rules above, the care must remain confidential; POST SEXUAL ASSAULT CARE Minors have the right to consent or refuse to consent to all post-sexual assault care. This includes: Medical services, even if the minor generally could not consent on her own (e.g., treatment of injuries). Many laws exist, and many have been proposed, to limit minors’ access to confidential health services such as birth control and abortion.

Frequently, restrictive laws impose parental notification or parental consent requirements. The ability of people younger than 18 (generally, the legal definition of a minor) to consent to a range of sensitive health care services—including sexual and reproductive health care, mental health services, and alcohol and drug abuse treatment—has expanded dramatically over the past several decades. confidential and must not be divulged to parents – including the sending of a bill. • DCF must be notified of a positive STD test if the minor is 12 years of age or younger. • Care and treatment of this minor must remain confidential, although DCF may proceed with their own investigation. mlpp.

Teens receive clear information about informed consent—their right to complete and understandable information about their care and medical procedures, and to give permission to receive medical care related to contraceptive and reproductive health. Teens receive clear information that confidential contraceptive and reproductive health services are available without the need for parent. This section clarifies a teen’s rights to consent to treatment relating to pregnancy, STIs, HIV and AIDS, sexual assault, substance use and mental health.

Section Vdiscusses the specific challenges faced by minors in foster care who seek confidential treatment. Section VIprovides an overview of public insurance programs available to minors.

List of related literature:

Although most states have provisions for confidential care for adolescents 16 years or older and for problems related to substance abuse, mental health, and sexual health, adolescents often are unaware of their ability to receive confidential health care.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Many teens will not seek reproductive health care if they have to involve a parent, making confidentiality necessary for comprehensive adolescent health care.

“Conn's Current Therapy 2016” by Edward T. Bope, Rick D. Kellerman
from Conn’s Current Therapy 2016
by Edward T. Bope, Rick D. Kellerman
Elsevier, 2015

Teens across the nation also have the right to consent to testing and treatment for STIs without parental permisSion (although some states allow for a parent to be notified if a doctor feels it’s in the best interests of the minor).

“My Teen Has Had Sex, Now What Do I Do?” by Ph.D., Maureen Lyon, Maureen Lyon, Ph.d., Christina Antoniades
from My Teen Has Had Sex, Now What Do I Do?
by Ph.D., Maureen Lyon, Maureen Lyon, Ph.d., Christina Antoniades
Fair Winds Press, 2009

However, in almost every jurisdiction, teens are entitled to medical privacy when they seek reproductive health care, including contraceptives, prenatal care, pregnancy and delivery services, HIV testing, and diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases.

“Swanson's Family Medicine Review E-Book” by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
from Swanson’s Family Medicine Review E-Book
by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

In many states adolescents have a legal right to confidential care for specific problems, including sexually transmitted infections, contraception and pregnancy, mental health issues, and substance abuse.

“Health Assessment for Nursing Practice E-Book” by Susan Fickertt Wilson, Jean Foret Giddens
from Health Assessment for Nursing Practice E-Book
by Susan Fickertt Wilson, Jean Foret Giddens
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

When releasing information to the parent of an adolescent, clinicians must respect the adolescent’s right to confidential health care when discussing medical issues related to sexual activity with peers.

“Child Abuse and Neglect E-Book: Diagnosis, Treatment and Evidence” by Carole Jenny
from Child Abuse and Neglect E-Book: Diagnosis, Treatment and Evidence
by Carole Jenny
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

It is important to let the teenager know that health care providers can be a confidential resource for reproductive health information and services.

“Textbook of Physical Diagnosis E-Book: History and Examination” by Mark H. Swartz
from Textbook of Physical Diagnosis E-Book: History and Examination
by Mark H. Swartz
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Teenagers have the right to confidentiality regarding contraception and treatment of STDs.

“The 5 Minute Pediatric Consult” by M. William Schwartz
from The 5 Minute Pediatric Consult
by M. William Schwartz
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2012

Youth access to accurate and complete information about reproductive and sexual health is seen as a basic human right (Guttmacher, 2017a).

“School Nursing: A Comprehensive Text” by Janice Selekman, Robin Adair Shannon, Catherine F Yonkaitis
from School Nursing: A Comprehensive Text
by Janice Selekman, Robin Adair Shannon, Catherine F Yonkaitis
F. A. Davis Company, 2019

To gain information about other aspects of adoles­cent sexual and reproductive health, librarians can turn to reports issued by organizations like the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, the Urban Institute, and the Guttmacher Institute.

“Sex, Brains, and Video Games, Second Edition: Information and Inspiration for Youth Services Librarians” by Jennifer Burek Pierce
from Sex, Brains, and Video Games, Second Edition: Information and Inspiration for Youth Services Librarians
by Jennifer Burek Pierce
American Library Association, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

2 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Due to the coronavirus (covid-19) pandemic and the urgent need for healthcare resources, we encourage you to only seek out sexual health services when its absolutely necessary and a true emergency.

  • Will you make a video about DID? There’s a big controversy over Dissociative Identity Disorder it will help shine a light on this disorder the channel DissociaDID can help you add some points on this mental disorder:)