Your Six Week Postpartum Check-up

 

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Why you need a postpartum checkup. Your doctor or midwife will want to see you four to six weeks after you give birth to check on your physical recovery from pregnancy and delivery, see how you’re doing emotionally, and address your needs going forward. (You may need to see your practitioner before this visit, as well. Your Six Week Postpartum Check Up Your Physical Exam. You will have a complete physical.

Your practitioner will check your vagina and, perineum and do a Discuss Birth Control Options. You may be surprised to learn that you can, in fact, become pregnant even while you are Review Your Labor and. “I had postpartum depression after my first and without those questions, I might have brushed it off and said I felt fine,” she says. One unexpected but common occurrence at the six-week postpartum check-up with midwives is feeling of profound sadness. “I didn’t want to say goodbye,” says Toronto mom Tamara Robbins Griffith. Your Six-week Checkup At about four to eight weeks following the birth and delivery, you will have a postpartum checkup with a doctor at your ob/gyn’s practice.

This checkup is to see if you are physically and emotionally well, and that you’re adjusting well to new motherhood. Though previously, it was routine to have your first and only postpartum checkup around four to six weeks after you deliver (with some moms, like those who had C-sections or pregnancy conditions like preeclampsia, going earlier), the guidelines have changed. In the past, ACOG recommended that most women have a postpartum checkup 4 to 6 weeks after giving birth. ACOG now says that postpartum care should be an ongoing process, rather than a one-time checkup. At about 6 weeks, you will likely have your postpartum check-up with your healthcare provider.

They will verify that any vaginal tears or c-section scars are healing properly and ensure that your uterus has shrunk down to its pre-pregnancy size. Your doctor will also do an overall health assessment. You should have your postnatal check 6 to 8 weeks after your baby’s birth to make sure you feel well and are recovering properly. Some GP surgeries do not routinely offer a postnatal check.

You can always request an appointment for a check, especially if you have any concerns. It’s a good idea to make a list of questions to take along with you. POSTNATAL HEALTH: Around six weeks after the birth of your baby, you will have a postnatal check-up. This can be done either at the hospital or by your GP. This examination is to check that you are recovering from your pregnancy and the birth, particularly if you have had a difficult delivery or a C-section.

Your provider may want you to wait until your six-week postpartum checkup to see how you’re doing first. Generally, if you exercised throughout your pregnancy and had a normal vaginal delivery, you can safely do light exercise – walking, modified push-ups, and stretching – within days of giving birth as long as you’re not in any pain.

List of related literature:

Most health care providers want to see the postpartum woman for a specific check-up 6 weeks after giving birth, although this may be earlier if there are specific concerns, and most women will have a breastfeeding assessment appointment prior to 6 weeks.

“Leifer's Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book” by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
from Leifer’s Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book
by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Most of these parametres return to normal puerperium, lactation, breast-feeding, breast feeding, breast-feeding, postpartum, postpartum depression, postpartum haemorrhage, uterine infection, mastitis, episiotomy infection within the first 2 weeks postpartum.

“Midwifery and Obstetrical Nursing” by Sharma
from Midwifery and Obstetrical Nursing
by Sharma
Gen Next Publications, 2009

1) Peripartum and Postpartum periods The postpartum period begins immediately after delivery and continues for six weeks following delivery.

“Buck's 2020 ICD-10-CM Physician Edition E-Book” by Elsevier
from Buck’s 2020 ICD-10-CM Physician Edition E-Book
by Elsevier
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The Department of Health Birth to five handbook should be provided to all postpartum women within the first 3 days after birth and its use discussed.

“Mayes' Midwifery E-Book: A Textbook for Midwives” by Sue Macdonald
from Mayes’ Midwifery E-Book: A Textbook for Midwives
by Sue Macdonald
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

3 The usual postpartum examination is 6 weeks after birth; menses can return earlier or later than this and should not be a factor when scheduling a postpartum examination.

“Mosby's Comprehensive Review of Nursing for NCLEX-RN® Examination” by Judith S. Green, Mary Ann Hellmer Saul, Dolores F. Saxton, Patricia M. Nugent, Phyllis K. Pelikan
from Mosby’s Comprehensive Review of Nursing for NCLEX-RN® Examination
by Judith S. Green, Mary Ann Hellmer Saul, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

The postpartum period begins immediately after delivery and continues for six weeks following delivery.

“ICD-10-CM/PCS Coding: Theory and Practice, 2018 Edition E-Book” by Karla R. Lovaasen
from ICD-10-CM/PCS Coding: Theory and Practice, 2018 Edition E-Book
by Karla R. Lovaasen
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Follow-Up Appointments Most health care providers want to see postpartum women 2 weeks and 6 weeks after birth.

“Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by Gloria Leifer
from Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by Gloria Leifer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

The first six weeks postpartum are considered a “recovery” period.

“What to Expect When You're Expecting 4th Edition” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What to Expect When You’re Expecting 4th Edition
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

This chapter discusses nursing care of the woman and her family in the postpartum period extending into the fourth trimester—the first 3 months after birth.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

■ Breastfeeding provides more than 98% protection from pregnancy during the first 6 months postpartum if the mother is “fully” or nearly fully breastfeeding and has not experienced vaginal bleeding after the 56th day postpartum.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • My 6 week appointment with the “family friend” OB from my husband’s side:
    ✓no PPD questionnaire (in fact he insisted my husband -whom I tried to leave in the waiting room came back and so I did not feel comfortable bringing it up even though I was def having symptoms).
    ✓no exam or physical contact whatsoever.
    ✓I was told that birth control side affects are a myth so not to call about them.
    ��
    3 weeks postpartum with my second and hoping for a little more attention from my midwife this time.

  • I’m 32 weeks pregnant with my first child and I feel like my ob is pressuring me to choose a birth control ASAP. I was on one 4-5 years ago and hated it. Not sure if I even want it again

  • I forgot to add the doctor did a breast exam as well as pressed on my belly to see if my uterus had gone back down into my pelvis.