Your 8-Month-Old Baby s Development

 

8 Months Old Baby Development, Activities & Care Tips

Video taken from the channel: FirstCry Parenting


 

8 Months Old Baby Milestones

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8-Month-Old Baby What to Expect

Video taken from the channel: What To Expect


 

Developmental Play for 8-Month-Old! | Kristen from Millennial Moms

Video taken from the channel: Millennial Moms


 

HOW TO PLAY WITH YOUR 8 MONTH OLD BABY | Developmental Milestones | Activities for Babies | CWTC

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BABY PLAY HOW TO PLAY WITH 6-12 MONTH OLD BABY BRAIN DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES

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Your Baby’s Development from 6 to 9 months Boys Town Pediatrics

Video taken from the channel: BoysTownHospital


Tips for Your Baby’s Eighth Month: By the time your baby is 8 months old, not only is she getting around, she’s also probably getting into everything! Babies are especially curious at this stage. By 8 months, your baby will slowly start to transition to eating more solid foods than breast milk or formula. 12  The biggest development this month is that your infant has more of a pincer grasp, so they are able to pick up food with the pointer finger and thumb.

This new skill opens up a whole new world of food possibilities!Baby Development: Your 8-Month-Old. By Steven Jerome Parker, MD. From the WebMD Archives. We’re up to 8 months.

Get ready for some major developmental changes in the next months!Follow the links below to read development information tailored to the specific week of your baby’s life. Your 8-month-old’s development: Week 1; Your 8-month-old’s development: Week 2; Your 8-month-old’s development: Week 3; Your 8-month-old’s development: Week 4; Look back Look ahead.

Your baby at 8 months may be learning to crawl, and starts crying when he sees people he doesn’t know. Stranger anxiety is common in babies at this age. Read more about important baby milestones you can expect from your eight-month-old.

Your 8-month-old baby’s cognitive development Your little one can recognize people and objects from across the room now that their eyesight is almost fully mature. They begin to understand the sound of their name and may perk up or turn toward you when you say it. Brace yourself; it’s adorable. In his 8th month, your baby is a physical dynamo. Your little one can probably move around on his tummy, work his way into a sitting position, and stay there for a long time.

Your baby may be creeping (pushing himself around on his belly), crawling, or moving about by bottom shuffling – scooting around on his posterior using a hand behind him and a foot in front of him to propel himself. Creeping is your baby’s first. Now that he’s eight months old, your baby may well be crawling. Or he may be getting about by bottom shuffling, slithering around on his tummy (sometimes known as commando crawling), or rolling. Growth and Physical Development of 8 Month Old Baby: Putting His Best Foot Forward By this time, your baby has likely more than doubled his birth weight.

The average 8-month-old baby boy’s weight falls somewhere between 17.5 and 22 pounds; girls usually weigh about a half a pound less at this age.

List of related literature:

By the age of six months most infants are able to belly crawl with raised head, progressing to full-fledged crawling by nine months.

“The Reciprocating Self: Human Development in Theological Perspective” by Jack O. Balswick, Pamela Ebstyne King, Kevin S. Reimer
from The Reciprocating Self: Human Development in Theological Perspective
by Jack O. Balswick, Pamela Ebstyne King, Kevin S. Reimer
InterVarsity Press, 2016

Thus the anticipated developmental skills of a 9-month-old baby (chronological age) born 3 months early at 28 weeks’ gestation are more like those of a 6-month-old baby (corrected age).

“Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics E-Book: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access” by Tom Lissauer, Graham Clayden
from Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics E-Book: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access
by Tom Lissauer, Graham Clayden
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

In examining the infant younger than 3 months, the provider should move the head passively on the examining table to the left and right to determine mobility and range of motion.

“Pediatric Physical Examination E-Book: An Illustrated Handbook” by Karen Duderstadt
from Pediatric Physical Examination E-Book: An Illustrated Handbook
by Karen Duderstadt
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

As we described earlier, the stepping reflex typically disappears at about 3 months of age as babies become chunkier and they cannot support their heavy bodies with their small legs (Thelen, Fisher, & Ridley-Johnson, 2002).

“Child Development” by Laura E. Levine, Joyce Munsch
from Child Development
by Laura E. Levine, Joyce Munsch
SAGE Publications, 2013

Smooth pursuit eye movements show the most maturation from 2 to 6 months old, and reaching almost an adult-like gain by 18 months old [3].

“The Eye in Pediatric Systemic Disease” by Alex V. Levin, Robert W. Enzenauer
from The Eye in Pediatric Systemic Disease
by Alex V. Levin, Robert W. Enzenauer
Springer International Publishing, 2017

In the first stages (birth to three months) the infant’s sucking, rooting, grasping, smiling, gazing, cuddling, and visual tracking are viewed as his or her efforts to maintain closeness with the mother.

“Ego Psychology and Social Work Practice: 2nd Edition” by Eda Goldstein, Professor Eda Goldstein, Dsw
from Ego Psychology and Social Work Practice: 2nd Edition
by Eda Goldstein, Professor Eda Goldstein, Dsw
Free Press, 1995

• The developing brain is dependent on the inputs of a variety of early sensory, perceptual, and motor experiences (e.g., sound, binocular vision, movement through space) that are easily met, unless a child is born with an auditory, visual, or motor deficit that interferes with the expected input.

“From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development” by National Research Council, Institute of Medicine, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Committee on Integrating the Science of Early Childhood Development, Deborah A. Phillips, Jack P. Shonkoff
from From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development
by National Research Council, Institute of Medicine, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2000

thought to coincide with the stages of cognitive development as described by Piaget61 and the development of language.62 The infant’s brain weight at 1 year is 60% of its adult weight, a gain of 10% in 6 months.

“Functional Movement Development Across the Life Span E-Book” by Donna J. Cech, Suzanne Tink Martin
from Functional Movement Development Across the Life Span E-Book
by Donna J. Cech, Suzanne Tink Martin
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

For example, at 6 months of age the infant would be expected to display the following sample behaviors (one is given for each realm of development): (a) gross motor-plays with toes, (b) fine motor-holds cube in each hand, (c) language-babbles, (d) social—holds arms up when about to be lifted.

“Measurement in Nursing and Health Research” by Dr. Carolyn F. Waltz, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dr. Ora Lea Strickland, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dr. Elizabeth R. Lenz, PhD, RN, FAAN
from Measurement in Nursing and Health Research
by Dr. Carolyn F. Waltz, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dr. Ora Lea Strickland, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dr. Elizabeth R. Lenz, PhD, RN, FAAN
Springer Publishing Company, 2010

Although the productive repertoires of typically developing children may be quite similar at 36 months, the developmental paths leading to the repertoire will vary considerably.

“Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics” by Keith Brown
from Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics
by Keith Brown
Elsevier Science, 2005

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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