Your 4-Week-Old Baby s Development

 

Lately my 4 week old wants to eat every hour. Is it a growth spurt? What should I do?

Video taken from the channel: IntermountainMoms


 

4 Week Old Baby Development

Video taken from the channel: BabyMom Care


 

4 Week Old Baby Your Baby’s Development, Week by Week

Video taken from the channel: Mama Natural


 

4 Weeks Old: What to Expect Channel Mum

Video taken from the channel: Channel Mum


 

Games for Your 4 Week Old Baby | 0-3 Month Games

Video taken from the channel: Pathways


 

Games for Your 6 Week Old Baby | 0-3 Month Games

Video taken from the channel: Pathways


 

Tummy time exercises for your baby

Video taken from the channel: Sunnybrook Hospital


Developmental guidelines simply show what your baby has the potential to accomplish – if not right now, then soon. If your baby was premature, keep in mind that kids born early usually need a bit more time to meet their milestones. If you have any questions at all about your baby’s development, ask your healthcare provider. Look back.

Look ahead. As a general rule, your baby’s development starts at the top his head and works downward. So as time goes on he’ll learn how to control his head and neck, followed by his arms, torso, then. Your 4 Week Old Baby’s Development & Growth Milestones Your little one is only a month old but she’s already an eating machine, taking in about 4 ounces during each of her eight to 12 meals a day.

This is tiring for you, Mama, but don’t worry, there’s a light at the end of this midnight feeding tunnel. Right now your little one has very little head control, so it is important to always support your baby’s head and neck when carrying them and while feeding Your baby’s hearing at 4 weeks Your baby’s hearing is now fully developed too, which means they will begin to listen to the source of voices and notice when you’re making loud noises around them. How should a 4-week-old baby be physically developing? By the four-week mark, your baby will start growing one inch per month and gaining 140-200 grams a week.

Their hearing is also fully developed after one month, which means they will begin to listen for the source of sounds and notice when you’re making loud noises around the room. Learn more fascinating facts about your 4-week-old’s development. Your life: Mixed feelings Even when you’re the happiest person on earth to be a new parent, it’s common to have nagging feelings of disappointment. You spent nine months imagining what your baby would be like, and the reality may not be exactly what you expected. Your Baby Is 4 Weeks Old!

Time to break out your silliest faces — baby loves watching you make funny expressions. She’s also drawn to contrasting patterns and light sources, so pick up some mobiles and baby toys with complex shapes for when your facial muscles tire. Newborn Baby Week 4 – Growth and Development. Feeding: 4 week old baby feeding schedules are getting better. Your baby is growing bigger and sucking more efficiently.

The nursing sessions are likely to get shorter as the baby grows. With each passing week, the baby’s tummy also grows and so, it can hold more milk. If your baby’s cheeks are full of angry red bumps or white pustules this week, you’re in good company. While the cause isn’t clear, the timing is pretty standard, showing up two to four weeks after birth. For many, it clears up as quickly as it appeared—your first chance to be amazed at how quickly babies.

Your baby’s development at four weeks old There will be an amazing moment – probably this week – when your baby discovers their hands and/or feet – possibly by accidentally whacking themselves with them. They won’t know what they are yet, though, as your baby doesn’t yet know they are a separate person from you.

List of related literature:

The typical baby first lifts her head while on her tummy at about two months old, then supports herself on her hands, sits up, crawls, stands, and shifts her weight from one leg to the other, all the while learning to use both sides of her body cooperatively.

“Raising a Sensory Smart Child: The Definitive Handbook for Helping Your Child with Sensory Integration Issues” by Lindsey Biel, Nancy K. Peske
from Raising a Sensory Smart Child: The Definitive Handbook for Helping Your Child with Sensory Integration Issues
by Lindsey Biel, Nancy K. Peske
Penguin Books, 2005

Around the time of the first brain growth spurt at three to four weeks, a baby begins to follow a ball with her eyes and grasp a soft object placed in her hand.

“Magic Trees of the Mind: How to Nuture your Child's Intelligence, Creativity, and Healthy Emotions from Birth Through Adolescence” by Marian Diamond, Janet Hopson
from Magic Trees of the Mind: How to Nuture your Child’s Intelligence, Creativity, and Healthy Emotions from Birth Through Adolescence
by Marian Diamond, Janet Hopson
Penguin Publishing Group, 1999

In the first stages (birth to three months) the infant’s sucking, rooting, grasping, smiling, gazing, cuddling, and visual tracking are viewed as his or her efforts to maintain closeness with the mother.

“Ego Psychology and Social Work Practice: 2nd Edition” by Eda Goldstein, Professor Eda Goldstein, Dsw
from Ego Psychology and Social Work Practice: 2nd Edition
by Eda Goldstein, Professor Eda Goldstein, Dsw
Free Press, 1995

This chapter describes the first two years in the development of body and brain—the physical growth, muscle control, and cortex maturation that make the toddler a much different person from the newborn.

“The Developing Person Through Childhood and Adolescence” by Kathleen Stassen Berger
from The Developing Person Through Childhood and Adolescence
by Kathleen Stassen Berger
Worth Publishers, 2008

Thus the anticipated developmental skills of a 9-month-old baby (chronological age) born 3 months early at 28 weeks’ gestation are more like those of a 6-month-old baby (corrected age).

“Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics E-Book: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access” by Tom Lissauer, Graham Clayden
from Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics E-Book: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access
by Tom Lissauer, Graham Clayden
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

In the first stage, during the first 3 months of life, infants engage in a variety of behaviors, including sucking, rooting, grasping, smiling, gazing, cuddling, crying, and visual tracking or following, which serve to maintain closeness with a caregiver or bring the caregiver to the infant.

“Development Through Life: A Psychosocial Approach” by Barbara M. Newman, Philip R. Newman
from Development Through Life: A Psychosocial Approach
by Barbara M. Newman, Philip R. Newman
Cengage Learning, 2012

Evidence suggests that the baby usually takes about 45–55 minutes to find the way to its mother’s breast using the primal reflexes such as stepping, crawling, grasping and, of course, rooting for the first latch and feed.

“Midwifery E-Book: Preparation for Practice” by Sally Pairman, Jan Pincombe, Carol Thorogood, Sally K. Tracy
from Midwifery E-Book: Preparation for Practice
by Sally Pairman, Jan Pincombe, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2015

By the age of six months most infants are able to belly crawl with raised head, progressing to full-fledged crawling by nine months.

“The Reciprocating Self: Human Development in Theological Perspective” by Jack O. Balswick, Pamela Ebstyne King, Kevin S. Reimer
from The Reciprocating Self: Human Development in Theological Perspective
by Jack O. Balswick, Pamela Ebstyne King, Kevin S. Reimer
InterVarsity Press, 2016

Moreover, the transition process of being mother to a new infant is different in the second and third months from the process in the first month (Pridham & Chang, 1992).

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

In the next period of development, beginning at age eight months, your baby will reveal herself as a “sitter” or a “crawler.”

“Montessori from the Start: The Child at Home, from Birth to Age Three” by Paula Polk Lillard, Lynn Lillard Jessen
from Montessori from the Start: The Child at Home, from Birth to Age Three
by Paula Polk Lillard, Lynn Lillard Jessen
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2008

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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13 comments

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  • Hello mama can I stop water to my 2 months baby can I give him gripe water what is good for gaining weight for my baby reply me soon

  • ok, but why? what’s the reason for this? Will he not be able to build strength later without doing this? Do we have bad time, so that we have to do this quickly? We do this, only to pass time? What’s the reason for doing this?

  • My daughter is 4 weeks this week and is doing so well. I’ve had to formula feed due to mental health, but she and I have been bonding through bottle feeding just fine. As for my body, it’s a lot for me to get used to. I’ve battled with body dysmorphia for pretty much my entire life and I’m trying so hard not to beat myself up. Other than that, I love being my little girl’s mommy.

  • Had a emergency c section that didnt go so well. They ended up cutting on me before my second epidural kicked in. Then my incision opened up and im still healing from that. But other than that nightmare. My baby girl is doing great. And only wakes up twice in the middle of the night for feedings.

  • I had terrible colic everyday at 6 pm. Back in the day, when a baby cried, they gave the baby a bottle. Many times, colic can be caused be reflux so that was the wrong thing to. I needed massage and tummy time. Such a simple remedy.

  • Wow what an awesome channel, it’s my first baby and I just adore our little girl who turned 4 weeks on Monday. Thanks for the great videos really comforting to see all the other moms and their stories

  • These videos are so good I’m struggling so much one month in. Had traumatic delivery with 2L blood loss and I just feel so weak and all my bones hurt. I wish I had a maid and cook etc someone to look after me so I could look after baby. Despite having husband it never feels enough ��

  • At which point in the video were you going to put the babies on their tummies and show us the “Tummy time exercises”????????????? ��

  • Eye contact is good with the baby even right away. They are very smart and like to see a happy face and someones eyes and it comforts them too

  • My little girl is 4 weeks on Thursday and still only weighing a teeny tiny 6lb 3oz! My delivery was horrific so recovery is slow going for me but I’m getting there now and baby is doing amazing

  • How different are times now!! My 43 year old son I was taught to sleep him on his tummy!! So he would not choke on spit up or vomit! Times have certainly changed x

  • To loft the head we are not using abdominal muscles.. we are using the erector spinae muscles on the posterior side of the body. Still core muscles but totally opposite from abdominals

  • Please don’t do this to newborn 8 weeks

    Their neck muscle and abdominal muscle is not developed enough

    Unlike adult, babies have abdominal thoracal breathing pattern in which they use abdominal muscle to initiate breath and expand diaphragm, the only time newborn 2mo need to be lie on back is when you are burping them and even then not on the floor or blanket (you hold them gently)