Why Some Women Decide To not Breastfeed

 

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Supporting women who haven’t been able to breastfeed Professor Amy Brown

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The World Health Organization suggests breastfeeding for at least two years. But women have begun to become more vocal about why opting out of the whole “breast is best” theory. Here are the reasons some women can’t or shouldn’t breastfeed. Low Breast Milk Supply Only a small percentage of women who want to breastfeed can’t due to lactation failure or a true low breast milk supply.

1  A true low milk supply is usually the result of an underlying condition. 1. Birth. 1991 Dec;18(4):222-5.

Why women decide not to breastfeed. Dix DN. The reasons for the low frequency of breastfeeding at an urban medical center were evaluated in a study in which 81 women were interviewed concerning the factors affecting their choice of infant feeding method and attitudes toward breastfeeding. Recent stats from the CDC show that nearly 80% of women in the U.S. at least attempt to breastfeed, but as for exclusively breastfeeding for six months, that number drops to 19%. So while I’m.

Negative attitudes can be deadly. Many well-meaning friends and family offer “suggestions”, often based on misinformation or old wives tales. Sometimes when a new mother expresses concerns about her baby nursing frequently the immediate response is that she is “starving” her baby and she needs to give formula. Breast engorgement may also occur. Your breasts may feel hard to the touch.

You may see swelling and feel pressure, discomfort, or pain for up to 10 days after delivery. Breast swelling can cause you to get a fever and have muscle aches. Other women may choose not to because: No milk flow. They suffered past trauma, such as rape or sexual assault and may be triggered.

They had a breast reduction in the past that is interfering with milk production. They can’t due to medical conditions, such as past or current cancers. As others have pointed out, some women choose not to breastfeed their baby from birth. As long as the woman is well-informed of the risks of not breastfeeding, and even if. I would guess some women also don’t breastfeed because of their jobs.

If they are subjected to different chemicals that could enter their blood streams i.e. Her family, partner or friends do not support breastfeeding and give her a hard time about it every time she tries to nurse. She’s received misinformation (or no information) about breast and formula feeding.

She has postpartum anxiety or depression, and breastfeeding became too much.

List of related literature:

Often there are cultural reasons – women have not seen any other women breastfeeding, and they may feel anxious about feeding in public or even in front of close family.

“The Positive Birth Book: A new approach to pregnancy, birth and the early weeks” by Milli Hill
from The Positive Birth Book: A new approach to pregnancy, birth and the early weeks
by Milli Hill
Pinter & Martin Ltd, 2017

Many women do not breastfeed because they want to return to a job, they lack the support of family and friends, or they are uncomfortable with this practice.

“Alters and Schiff Essential Concepts for Healthy Living” by Jeff Housman, Mary Odum
from Alters and Schiff Essential Concepts for Healthy Living
by Jeff Housman, Mary Odum
Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC, 2015

Research also indicates that women who breastfeed suffer significant reduction in their shortand long-term income and that mothers who are marginalized in the workforce because they care for babies and small children are at greater risk for economic hardship when they are older.

“Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities” by Jill Yamasaki, Patricia Geist-Martin, Barbara F. Sharf
from Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities
by Jill Yamasaki, Patricia Geist-Martin, Barbara F. Sharf
Waveland Press, 2016

The majority of mothers who breastfed reported that they had received sufficient advice about breastfeeding, that they had found breastfeeding enjoyable and satisfying, that they would breastfeed their next child, and that they would encourage their friends to breastfeed.

“Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health and Medicine” by Andrew Baum, Stanton Newman, John Weinman, Robert West, Chris McManus
from Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health and Medicine
by Andrew Baum, Stanton Newman, et. al.
Cambridge University Press, 1997

Because no known disadvantages exist for normal infants, the disadvantages of breastfeeding are those factors perceived by the mother as an inconvenience to her.

“Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession” by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
from Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession
by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Some women may not be willing or able to breastfeed

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

All women need to know the reasons to breastfeed as well as the risks of not breastfeeding so that they can make informed decisions about how they will feed their babies.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

They also need to know that there is increasing evidence that not breastfeeding her child could increase a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer or breast cancer in the premenopausal period.

“Breastfeeding: Biocultural Perspectives” by Patricia Stuart Macadam, Katherine A. Dettwyler
from Breastfeeding: Biocultural Perspectives
by Patricia Stuart Macadam, Katherine A. Dettwyler
Transaction Publishers,

There can be modesty issues; women fear the embarrassment of having to breastfeed in public.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

It is generally agreed that breastfeeding is excellent nutrition and that it is important for a child to get mother’s milk in the first months after delivery, and thus that a supportive environment for breastfeeding should be facilitated.

“Gender Inequalities in the 21st Century: New Barriers and Continuing Constraints” by Jacqueline L. Scott, Rosemary Crompton, Clare Lyonette
from Gender Inequalities in the 21st Century: New Barriers and Continuing Constraints
by Jacqueline L. Scott, Rosemary Crompton, Clare Lyonette
Edward Elgar Publishing, Incorporated, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Thank you for expressing a different opinion than the masses. Being pregnant has made me realize there’s ALWAYS a “healthier” choice you could have made-with literally everything from what you choose to eat, how much exercise you get, your mental health and the list just goes on and on! Breastfeeding is a personal decision and everyone should mind their business and continue to do the best they can with their own children. Thanks again Trinity❤️