While using Combination Pill While Breastfeeding

 

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Option #2: Mini-pill Traditional birth control pills contain a mixture of the hormones estrogen and progestin. Some women may experience a reduced milk supply, and consequently a shorter duration. Based on the available evidence, expert opinion in the United States states that postpartum women who are breastfeeding should not use combined hormonal contraceptives during the first 3 weeks after delivery because of concerns about increased risk for venous thromboembolism and generally should not use combined hormonal contraceptives during. Postpartum women who are breastfeeding should not use combined hormonal contraceptives during the first 3 weeks after delivery (U.S.

MEC 4) because of concerns about increased risk for venous thromboembolism and generally should not use combined hormonal contraceptives during the fourth week postpartum (U.S. MEC 3) because of concerns about. However, estrogen has been found to decrease milk production in nursing mothers, so you should avoid combination pills while breastfeeding. Instead, doctors usually recommend progestin-only pills. Use of combined hormonal contraception (CHC) by women following childbirth Based on breastfeeding status alone, CHC can be used by breastfeeding women safely after 6 weeks following childbirth (UKMEC 2 between 6 weeks and 6 months; UKMEC 1 from 6 months.

EFFECTS ON MILK PRODUCTION Some oral contraceptives contain both estrogen and progestin, others progestin only. Estrogencontaining birth control pills are not considered compatible with breastfeeding since estrogens suppress milk production. The progestin-only pill (called the mini pill), has not been reported to affect milk production. You may have heard that using birth control pills while breastfeeding is dangerous. While combined oral contraceptives pose no threat to your baby, they do risk compromising your milk supply.

Combined oral contraceptives contain both progesterone and estrogen. Since estrogen has been linked to low milk supply, breastfeeding mothers are usually advised to. A combination pill containing progesterone and estrogen does prevent pregnancy but causes a substantial impact on the level of milk. If pills are taken prior to the completion of the six months exclusive breastfeeding period, it can lead to breastfeeding issues. Combination pills may reduce the amount and quality of your breast milk in the first 3 weeks of breastfeeding.

If you’re nursing, wait at least 3 weeks after giving birth to start using combination pills. Your breast milk will contain traces of the pill’s hormones, but it’s not likely that these hormones will have any effect on your baby. Take 1 pill every day for 28 days (four weeks) in a row, and then start a new pack on day 29.

The last pills in 28-day packs of combination pills do not have hormones in them. These pills are called “reminder” or “placebo” pills — they help remind you to.

List of related literature:

If the woman is exclusively breastfeeding the baby at regular intervals, including night time (full breastfeeding), the pill may be started in the third postpartum month.

“Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics” by R. S. Satoskar, Nirmala Rege, S. D. Bhandarkar
from Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics
by R. S. Satoskar, Nirmala Rege, S. D. Bhandarkar
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

It is best not to use a combination contraceptive during breastfeeding unless you intend to stop nursing soon.

“The Nursing Mother's Companion” by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
from The Nursing Mother’s Companion
by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
Harvard Common Press, 2005

Combination pills are not usually prescribed for women who are breastfeeding.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

This is because while oestrogen in the combined pill affects the milk supply, the amount of progesterone that might pass through the breast milk from the progesterone-only pill is extremely low, harmless to the baby and will not affect the milk supply.

“Making Sense of Sex: A Forthright Guide to Puberty, Sex and Relationships for People with Asperger's Syndrome” by Sarah Attwood
from Making Sense of Sex: A Forthright Guide to Puberty, Sex and Relationships for People with Asperger’s Syndrome
by Sarah Attwood
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2008

The oestrogen content of the pill is inclined to reduce lactation by suppressing prolactin and is also passed to the baby, albeit in small quantities, in the breast milk, so the combined contraceptive pill is not recommended for breastfeeding mothers.

“Mayes' Midwifery E-Book: A Textbook for Midwives” by Sue Macdonald
from Mayes’ Midwifery E-Book: A Textbook for Midwives
by Sue Macdonald
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

There are some birth control pills that are considered safe to take while nursing, but they all contain hormones that you will pass on to your baby.

“Your Vegetarian Pregnancy: A Month-by-Month Guide to Health and Nutrition” by Holly Roberts
from Your Vegetarian Pregnancy: A Month-by-Month Guide to Health and Nutrition
by Holly Roberts
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These authors recommend mixing feedings (breastfeeding and formula) early postpartum to reduce the medication to the infant until levels in infant serum taper a little and the infant’s metabolism increases to promote drug clearance.

“Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession” by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
from Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession
by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

There was no difference in continuation of breastfeeding between the two groups at 8 weeks (64.1% combined pills vs. 63.5% progestin-only contraceptives) or 6 months.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Most medications are compatible with breastfeeding, but a few are not.

“Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers” by Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman
from Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers
by Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman
New Harbinger Publications, 2010

Most medications do not contraindicate breastfeeding, but a few exceptions do exist (see Chapter 7).

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Respected mam!
    Can i take contraceptive( I pill ) if i have baby girl and she takes my breastfeed? Please reply urgently i’ll be thankful yours!