Whenever Your Child’s Speech Delay Is really a Warning Sign

 

Red Flags Signs of Developmental Delay Pediatrics

Video taken from the channel: Indian Medico


 

Red Flags in Autism

Video taken from the channel: Patricia Ruiz


 

My Son Has A Speech Delay

Video taken from the channel: Maria Quiroz


 

What is Autism? Autism Red Flags PART 1 COMMUNICATION

Video taken from the channel: Walkie Talkie Speech Therapy Inc.


 

Red flags of speech delay

Video taken from the channel: Early Autism Project Malaysia


 

Red flags in Speech and Language for a Child

Video taken from the channel: Patricia Ruiz


 

What causes Speech and Language Disorders?

Video taken from the channel: Walkie Talkie Speech Therapy Inc.


Sometimes, though, speaking late or speech that is unclear can signal a developmental delay or a physical problem. In those cases, your child may benefit from speech therapy. The first step is to determine whether your child’s speech is really off target for his age.

Check with your child’s pediatrician anytime you have a question or concern. Speech Delay In Toddlers: 19 Red Flags To Watch For. Seeme & Liz > Parenting Tips (0-2 year olds) > Speech Delay In Toddlers: 19 Red Flags To Watch For. Children develop at different rates. Some children walk at 9 months where others don’t take their first steps until 15 months.

Both of these are considered normal. Red flags for a speech or language delay include: No babbling by 9 months. No first words by 15 months. No consistent words by 18 months. No word combinations by 24 months.

Slowed or stagnant speech development. Problems understanding your child’s speech at 24 months of age; strangers having problems understanding your child’s speech by 36 months of age. It just means that it might be a red flag. These are important things related to speech delays, that you should definitely talk to your pediatrician about, and get a referral for a speech and language evaluation, because we know that autism is, the majority is, a social pragmatic disorder.

It’s a communication barrier. Red flags for a speech or language delay include: No babbling by 9 months. No first words by 15 months.

No consistent words by 18 months. Not sure if your child has a language delay? In part one of this audio and video podcast, join pediatric speech-language pathologist Laura Mize, M.S., CCC-SLP of teachmetotalk.com as we discuss 12 red flags in infants and toddlers that indicate problems with the development of communication skills. Recommendations for explaining how each skill. Red Flags of Speech and Language Delay.

If your child demonstrates several of the following characteristics, a speech and language evaluation may be necessary. Doesn’t babble by 9 months. Doesn’t respond or react to name by 12 months.

Doesn’t wave “bye bye”, point or use other gestures by 12 months. The following “red flags” may indicate your child is at risk for a speech and/or language delay and may benefit from an evaluation. If you have any concerns in these areas or are not sure and would like to know more give us a call.

The following are speech/language red flags for referral: Decreased eye contact during interactions. The following red flag checklist can help give you a general idea if your child is not following typical patterns of development. It is important to note that some children develop language a few months earlier or later than these general guidelines.

Red Flags for Language Development by 3-4 months: Child does not react to sudden noises. ADHD Warning Signs and Red Flags in Children and Adolescents Dr O December 7, 2015 December 8, 2015 ADHD. The following symptoms and behaviors may indicate the presence of an executive functioning disorder, such as ADHD.

An evaluation by a licensed psychologist or other medical provider can help determine if ADHD is the cause of these.

List of related literature:

Speech delays or language deficits, particularly difficulties with expressive language, are the most common concerns shared by parents about children between age 1 and 5 years (Filipek et al. 1999).

“Handbook of Early Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders: Research, Policy, and Practice” by Jonathan Tarbox, Dennis R. Dixon, Peter Sturmey, Johnny L. Matson
from Handbook of Early Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders: Research, Policy, and Practice
by Jonathan Tarbox, Dennis R. Dixon, et. al.
Springer New York, 2014

If parents are concerned that their child’s speech or language is delayed, they need to speak with their health care provider.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Children with mild delays are generally intelligible to most listeners, but their speech errors call attention to the way they speak (Box 5-3).

“Communication Sciences and Disorders: From Science to Clinical Practice” by Ronald B. Gillam, Thomas P. Marquardt
from Communication Sciences and Disorders: From Science to Clinical Practice
by Ronald B. Gillam, Thomas P. Marquardt
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

In a 2-year-old who is not talking, there is just not enough information available to determine whether speech-motor deficits or childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) contribute to the speech delay.

“Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence E-Book: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating” by Rhea Paul, Courtenay Norbury
from Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence E-Book: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating
by Rhea Paul, Courtenay Norbury
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

In a 2-year-old who is not talking, there is just not enough information available to determine whether or not speech-motor deficits or childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) contribute to the speech delay.

“Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence: Assessment & Intervention” by Rhea Paul
from Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence: Assessment & Intervention
by Rhea Paul
Mosby, 2007

However, it is not uncommon for children, particularly boys, to have delayed speech up until approximately two years of age, so parents will often wait, thinking that their child may in fact be a slow talker.

“Mental Health Nursing: Applying Theory to Practice” by Gylo (Julie) Hercelinskyj, Louise Alexander
from Mental Health Nursing: Applying Theory to Practice
by Gylo (Julie) Hercelinskyj, Louise Alexander
Cengage Learning Australia, 2019

Regardless of severity, however, children diagnosed with Speech Delay are expected to achieve short-term normalization with appropriate interventions.

“Introduction to Speech Sound Disorders” by Françoise Brosseau-Lapré, Susan Rvachew
from Introduction to Speech Sound Disorders
by Françoise Brosseau-Lapré, Susan Rvachew
Plural Publishing, Incorporated, 2018

Early intervention, however, is dependent upon valid and reliable early identification of speech disorder, indicating a need for a formal assessment that identifies toddlers at risk for speech disorder.

“Children's Speech Sound Disorders” by Caroline Bowen
from Children’s Speech Sound Disorders
by Caroline Bowen
Wiley, 2014

Speech delay is the most common developmental concern raised by parents.

“Blueprints Pediatrics” by Bradley S. Marino, Katie Snead Fine
from Blueprints Pediatrics
by Bradley S. Marino, Katie Snead Fine
Lippincott William & Wilkins, 2009

Fortunately, healthcare providers are usually now alert to developmental problems, although occasionally a physician may still reassure worried parents that their child is “just language delayed.”

“Handbook of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Assessment, Interventions, and Policy” by Fred R. Volkmar, Rhea Paul, Sally J. Rogers, Kevin A. Pelphrey
from Handbook of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Assessment, Interventions, and Policy
by Fred R. Volkmar, Rhea Paul, et. al.
Wiley, 2014

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • My son is almost 2 years old and he has yet to say a single word. We have gotten his hearing tested multiple times and he does have slight hearing loss in his right ear (most likely fluid) but he can hear perfectly out of his left ear and they said he can hear quiet sounds overall. He does also follow simple instructions that I give him. We are still on the road to fixing his ears but they said that this isn’t the reason for his speech delay. This has me very confused. He was born at 37 weeks (induced) and only weighed 5 pounds. He shows no other signs of Autism. Your thoughts?

  • Hello! Thank you for all the videos you have shared. Im eager to use some exercises with my 30month old boy. He can sing from memory, counts to 20 in two languages, knows all the colors, shapes, animals, the abcs. Has been seen by a pediatric neurologist and he didnt see signs of autism. He is very sociable, but shy at first. He also responds to us very well, and connects with us.
    But at daycare they continue to alarm me he doesnt follow the instructions, he is behind in fine motor skills and problem solving; etc. He is very smart, they always praise him on that, and has great memory, but is very hyper, and lacking some fine motor skills at this age.
    Speech therapy has been suggested by the daycare teacher. But I cannot afford it.
    Would love to know your general opinion on this. I do understand is not as good as getting an evaluation. But I just wonder of he might in fact be autistic. I should mention he did have chronic ear infections right after turning 1, and not until 18 months did he get the tubes put in.