When you should Start Feeding Your Child Food

 

When to Start Your Child’s Solid Foods Nutrition Series

Video taken from the channel: Global Health Media Project


 

5 Signs Your Baby is Ready for Solid Food | Start introducing solid food to your baby

Video taken from the channel: Women & Baby Care


 

Introducing Solid Foods to Your Baby: What I Wish Someone Told Me [Part 1]

Video taken from the channel: Feeding My Kid


 

How to Feed Your Baby Solid Food | Susan Yara

Video taken from the channel: Susan Yara


 

When to start feeding your child solid foods | UNICEF

Video taken from the channel: UNICEF


 

Introducing solid foods to your baby

Video taken from the channel: MGHfC


 

When and how do I start my baby on solid foods?

Video taken from the channel: IntermountainMoms


For babies who are exclusively breast-fed, waiting until age 6 months before introducing solid food can help ensure that they get the full health benefits of breast-feeding. Starting solids too early — before age 4 months — might: Pose a risk of food being sucked into the airway (aspiration) Cause a baby to get too many or not enough calories or nutrients; Increase a baby’s risk of obesity; Als. What to serve when.

Start simple. Offer single-ingredient foods that contain no sugar or salt. Wait three to five days between each new food to see if your baby has a Important nutrients. Iron and zinc are important nutrients in the second half of your baby’s first year.

These nutrients are. Your child can begin eating solid foods at about 6 months old. By the time he or she is 7 or 8 months old, your child can eat a variety of foods from different food groups. These foods include infant cereals, meat or other proteins, fruits, vegetables, grains, yogurts and cheeses, and more.

How to Introduce Baby to Solids. Up to 9 months, feed her 20 to 28 ounces of formula daily or breast milk every 3 to 4 hours. At 9 to 12 months, feed her 16 to 24 ounces of formula daily or breast milk every 4 to 5 hours.

Generally, when infants double their birth weight (typically at about 4 months of age) and weigh about 13 pounds or more, they may be ready for solid foods. NOTE: The AAP recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for your baby for about 6 months. Starting solid foods before your baby is ready will not increase his sleep at night, is not necessary for larger babies, and does not initially increase calories. Some Signs of readiness: Baby is about six months old Baby is able to sit, unsupported. When your baby first starts solids, offer him 1 to 2 tablespoons of food once a day, then add a second meal after he’s responded well for a week or two.

Baby should be getting cereals, fruit. As long as your baby shows signs of readiness, your child’s doctor may say you can start solids any time around 4 to 6 months. Until then, breast milk or formula provides all the calories and nourishment your baby needs – and can handle. Age: 6 to 8 months.

Age: 8 to 10 months. Age: 10 to 12 months. Use this guide to find out what and how much to feed your child in the first year. The amounts are general recommendations only, so don’t worry if your little one eats a bit more or less than suggested. It’s always a good idea to discuss your plan for starting solids with your child’s doctor before getting started.

Could it be time to start her on solids? If your baby is between 4 and 6 months old, can hold her head up, and can sit in a high chair independently, then she’s ready to try eating. (If you.

List of related literature:

Some physicians maintain that the infant should be fed on the old schedule which began feeding at four to six weeks with cereal and gradually increased solids over the next several months; others assert that it is more appropriate to wait approximately six months before beginning cereal.

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, W. E. Jacott, M. G. Rosen, Robert B. Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, et. al.
Springer New York, 2013

At four months your baby’s diet still consists mainly of breast milk and/or formula (with added fluoride, vitamins, or iron if your pediatrician recommends it), but by four to six months you can begin adding solid foods.

“Caring for Your Baby and Young Child” by Steven P. Shelov
from Caring for Your Baby and Young Child
by Steven P. Shelov
Oxford University Press, 1997

Solid foods are recommended to be introduced after 6 months of age, although they are often introduced earlier as parents often consider that their infant is hungry.

“Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics E-Book: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access” by Tom Lissauer, Graham Clayden
from Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics E-Book: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access
by Tom Lissauer, Graham Clayden
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

When to Start Solids Some physicians maintain that the infant should be fed on the old schedule which began feeding at 4 to 6 weeks with cereal and gradually increased solids over the next several months; others assert that it is more appropriate to wait approximately 6 months before beginning cereal.

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, W. E. Jacott, M. G. Rosen, Robert B. Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, et. al.
Springer New York, 2013

The consensus among healthcare providers is to delay the introduction of solid foods until the child is at least 4 months old.

“Medical Nutrition and Disease: A Case-Based Approach” by Lisa Hark, Darwin Deen, Gail Morrison
from Medical Nutrition and Disease: A Case-Based Approach
by Lisa Hark, Darwin Deen, Gail Morrison
Wiley, 2014

Introduction of solid foods before the infant is 4 to 6 months of age can result in overfeeding and decreased intake of breast milk or formula.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Continuing to breastfeed lowers parents’ stress by allowing them to introduce solid foods as a socialization measure, knowing that the mother’s milk continues to provide the bulk of her baby’s nutritional needs from age 6 to 12 months.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

The decision to start solid foods at 4 to 6 months of age is based more on neuromuscular and developmental readiness of the infant than on any hard scientific data, but research does validate the lowered risk of developing food allergies if solid foods are not introduced until 6 months of age.

“Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book” by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
from Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book
by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Introducing Solid Foods to Infants Although breast milk or infant formula meets most nutritional needs until 1 year of age, semisolid and solid foods can be gradually introduced into the infant’s diet starting between 4 and 6 months.

“Nutrition: Science and Applications” by Lori A. Smolin, Mary B. Grosvenor
from Nutrition: Science and Applications
by Lori A. Smolin, Mary B. Grosvenor
Wiley, 2019

The woman should not begin to feed solid foods until the infant’s primary care provider has recommended it, usually around 6 to 8 months of age.

“Broadribb's Introductory Pediatric Nursing” by Nancy T. Hatfield
from Broadribb’s Introductory Pediatric Nursing
by Nancy T. Hatfield
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

3 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Now I’m confused cause my health visitor said NOT to salt any food during weaning as it takes baby over his salt allowance. Im still so confused!

  • I don’t say things for the parents the mother and the father get mad with me okay but I’m going to see my baby when it comes a Big Mac yeah that’s right sunox it up a Big Mac and some french fries that’s what I’m going to do hahaha you don’t have a sense of humor

  • heyy thank you for this video!!! My baby boy just turned 6 months last week so he just started on solids. I would love for you to do a video on meals/ mela planning for baby and I. Meals that’s for my husband and i but that he could benefit from!