What Parents Ought To Know About Severe Jaundice

 

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●Untreated jaundice can cause brain damage. ●Newborns should be checked for jaundice before leaving the hospital and again within 48 hours after hospital discharge. ●Jaundice is the number one reason babies are readmitted to the hospital. ●1 in 10 babies has jaundice that may require treatment. Any baby can get jaundice. Severe jaundice that is not treated can cause brain damage.

Your baby should be checked for jaundice in the hospital and again within 48 hours after leaving the hospital. Ask your doctor or nurse about a jaundice bilirubin test. Doctors can tell if a baby has jaundice based on a yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes. All newborns are checked for jaundice before leaving the hospital or birth center.

Babies with jaundice will get a blood test to check bilirubin levels. Sometimes, a light machine that measures bilirubin in. Babies at highest risk for developing newborn jaundice are: premature babies (babies born before 37 weeks’ gestation) babies who aren’t getting enough breast milk or formula, either because they’re having a hard time feeding or because babies whose blood type isn’t compatible with the.

Jaundice is the yellow discoloration of skin or the whites of the eyes due to an increase in the bile pigment bilirubin in the blood. Bilirubin is the yellow byproduct from the breakdown and excretion of red blood cells from the body. There are two jaundice forms: physiologic and cholestatic. Jaundice is a common condition affecting around 60 per cent of newborn babies in the first week of life. For the vast majority it is not an issue and will go without any treatment.

Jaundice is a condition in which the skin, whites of the eyes and mucous membranes turn yellow because of a high level of bilirubin, a yellow-orange bile pigment. Jaundice has many causes, including hepatitis, gallstones and tumors. In adults, jaundice usually doesn’t need to be treated. Jaundice is caused by a buildup of bilirubin, a waste material, in the blood.

An inflamed liver or obstructed bile duct can lead to jaundice, as well as other underlying conditions. Symptoms. Jaundice is due to an elevated level of yellowish pigment in the blood called bilirubin that forms when the baby’s body breaks down red blood cells. Bilirubin is carried through blood to the liver, where it’s tagged to a chemical and excreted into bile, the green pigment made by the liver, and then moves out of the body as waste.

Breastfeeding — Jaundice can be seen in breastfed babies for two key reasons: ● Some babies do not get enough breast milk because they have difficulty feeding or the mother is not producing enough breast milk. If this happens, the baby may lose a large amount of.

List of related literature:

• Parents should receive written and verbal information about jaundice.

“Comprehensive Neonatal Nursing Care: Fifth Edition” by Carole Kenner, PhD, NNP, FAAN, Judy Wright Lott, DSN, RN, BC-NNP, FAAN
from Comprehensive Neonatal Nursing Care: Fifth Edition
by Carole Kenner, PhD, NNP, FAAN, Judy Wright Lott, DSN, RN, BC-NNP, FAAN
Springer Publishing Company, 2013

In older infants, there are fewer benign explanations for jaundice.

“Nelson Pediatric Symptom-Based Diagnosis E-Book” by Robert M. Kliegman, Patricia S Lye, Brett J. Bordini, Heather Toth, Donald Basel
from Nelson Pediatric Symptom-Based Diagnosis E-Book
by Robert M. Kliegman, Patricia S Lye, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Pay particular attention to preterm and late preterm infants because parents may not realize the increased risk for jaundice.

“Maternal-Child Nursing E-Book” by Emily Slone McKinney, Susan R. James, Sharon Smith Murray, Kristine Nelson, Jean Ashwill
from Maternal-Child Nursing E-Book
by Emily Slone McKinney, Susan R. James, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

The possibility of obstructive jaundice requires immediate assessment and investigation with referral to a specialist paediatric

“Oxford Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology” by Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, William Ledger, Stergios Doumouchtsis, Lynette Denny
from Oxford Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
by Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, William Ledger, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2019

All other infants with visible jaundice should be assessed for risk factors and feeding difficulty and liberally

“Swanson's Family Medicine Review E-Book” by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
from Swanson’s Family Medicine Review E-Book
by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Children experiencing these complications have jaundice, amber urine, and hyperbilirubinemia (bilirubin levels ranging from 13 to 76 mg/dL).

“Pediatric Nursing: A Case-Based Approach” by Gannon Tagher, Lisa Knapp
from Pediatric Nursing: A Case-Based Approach
by Gannon Tagher, Lisa Knapp
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2019

It is imperative that the nurse discuss signs of jaundice with the mother because any clinical symptoms will probably appear at home.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

It is important for the nurse to discuss signs of jaundice with the mother because any clinical symptoms will probably appear at home.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by David Wilson, Marilyn J. Hockenberry
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by David Wilson, Marilyn J. Hockenberry
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Young infants with cholestatic jaundice should be evaluated promptly to identify patients needing specific medical treatment or surgical intervention.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book” by Robert M. Kliegman, Joseph St. Geme
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book
by Robert M. Kliegman, Joseph St. Geme
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Bilirubin The nurse assesses for jaundice at least every 8 to 12 hours and is particularly watchful when infants are at increased risk for hyperbilirubinemia (see Chapter 19).

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing” by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing
by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • Male,19 here
    my parents left it untreated for me because of my grandfather’s unorthodox thinking that “its family blood and we won’t approve blood transfusion”,i know how hard it has been for me.
    but yeah i am ready to do anything and go upto any length if i need to if it ever happens to my child because NO ONE’s thinking is more important than my child

  • I would highly recommend you to visit https://www.pediatriconcall.com/articles/neonatology/kernicterus/kernicterus-introduction#2032

  • My baby has his level at 15 right now thanks for the information. This Kenicterus won’t affect my baby BOY. I SAID IT IN THE NAME OF JESUS.