Vulnerable Child Syndrome and Preemies

 

Shaken Baby Syndrome Brain Injury

Video taken from the channel: AFMSCEMMTube


 

Volunteer baby cuddlers bring comfort to NICU preemies and their families

Video taken from the channel: NBC 26


 

The Impact of Early Emotional Neglect

Video taken from the channel: The School of Life


 

Child Abuse (Psychiatry) USMLE Step 1

Video taken from the channel: Mad Medicine


 

Vulnerable Child The core of the Schema Therapy model

Video taken from the channel: the PSYCH collective


 

The Dangers of Creating “Vulnerable Child Syndrome”

Video taken from the channel: brainline


 

Project 259: The impact of a preemie | Camaryn Petersen | TEDxConcordCarlisleHighSchool

Video taken from the channel: TEDx Talks


Vulnerable child syndrome is a medical condition that affects children and their parents. It develops when a child has a potentially life-threatening issue during infancy such as prematurity, a birth problem, or an illness that causes parents to have overwhelming feelings of anxiety and fear about their child’s health even if the child is doing well and growing in a normal, healthy way. Vulnerable child syndrome (VCS) describes a phenomenon in which a child is perceived as being at higher risk for medical, behavioral, or developmental problems than is warranted by the child’s current health. It is most often thought to occur in children who have experienced a serious or life-threatening event or who have a chronic medical condition. T. Berry Brazelton M.D., in Encounters with Children (Fourth Edition), 2006.

Stein prepares us in the perinatal period for preventing the “ vulnerable child syndrome.” Dixon says “parents of premature infants are premature, too.” Kaiser addresses the important issue of mothers dealing with sibling rivalry in the postpartum period. Though most premature infants do well, they are particularly at risk for the “vulnerable child syndrome.” This is a child with an imagined or real illness early in life, resulting in the parents developing a long-term sense of the child being particularly susceptible to illness or injury. Vulnerable child syndrome is described as a “set of clinical features in which unfounded parental anxiety about the health of a child resulted in disturbances of the parent-child interaction,”. Vulnerable child syndrome, parental perception of child vulnerability, and emergency department usage. Chambers PL(1), Mahabee-Gittens EM, Leonard AC.

Author information: (1)Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Did your child develop ‘vulnerable child syndrome’? User in San Francisco, CA Oct.

16, 2017 I’ve heard that preemies can develop this because their parents are overprotective of them and consider them ‘fragile’ and just do everything to protect their child. Vulnerable Child Syndrome and Preemies. Medically reviewed by Joel Forman, MD Twitching and Jitteriness in Preemies.

Medically reviewed by Lyndsey Garbi, MD A Weekly Look at Premature Babies and Complications. Medically reviewed by Lyndsey Garbi, MD NICU Conversions and Calculations. Parents may also develop symptoms of what has been termed the ‘vulnerable child syndrome.’ In this syndrome, parents with a history of having a medically fragile infant become overprotective, limiting their child’s independence, because they want to make up for their child’s trauma.

In 1964 Green and Solnit described a phenomenon, the Vulnerable Child Syndrome (VCS), whereby children who were at one point in their lives expected to die subsequently recovered, but their health continued to be perceived as being more vulnerable than it in actuality was, resulting in heightened anxiety in parents that causes disturbance in parent-child interactions and adverse, long lasting outcomes in the child.

List of related literature:

Most, though not all, NICU conditions fall into one of the following four broad categories: prematurity, perinatal asphyxia, congenital anomalies and/or genetic diagnoses, and neonatal abstinence syndrome.

“Clinical Handbook of Psychological Consultation in Pediatric Medical Settings” by Bryan D. Carter, Kristin A. Kullgren
from Clinical Handbook of Psychological Consultation in Pediatric Medical Settings
by Bryan D. Carter, Kristin A. Kullgren
Springer International Publishing, 2020

This publication goes beyond safety in the maternal-childcare unit to safety in special care nurseries, pediatric facilities, outpatient areas, and the home.1 The number of infants abducted from hospitals (from 1983 to June 2009), including the location of the abduction and degree of violence, is shown in Table 20-1.

“Hospital and Healthcare Security” by Russell Colling, Tony W York
from Hospital and Healthcare Security
by Russell Colling, Tony W York
Elsevier Science, 2009

Stierling, J. & AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect (2007) Beyond Munchausen syndrome by proxy: identification and treatment of child abuse in a medical setting.

“Handbook of Forensic Medicine” by Burkhard Madea
from Handbook of Forensic Medicine
by Burkhard Madea
Wiley, 2014

The term vulnerable child syndrome is applied to physically healthy children who are perceived by their parents to be at high risk for medical

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Vulnerable child syndrome is a psychological condition parents experience—identified by Green and Solnit (1964)—usually following their child’s serious illness, hospitalization (including for prematurity), or survival of a life-threatening event (Nelson, 2007).

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

Groups considered high-risk include young children (<3 yr old), as well as those with severe OSA documented on polysomnography, significant clinical sequelae of OSA (e.g., failure to thrive), or associated medical conditions, such as craniofacial syndromes, morbid obesity, and hypotonia.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book” by Robert M. Kliegman, Bonita F. Stanton, Joseph St. Geme, Nina F Schor, Richard E. Behrman
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book
by Robert M. Kliegman, Bonita F. Stanton, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Infants Young Child 12(4):34–52 Østensjø S, Carlberg EB, Vøllestad NK (2003) Everyday functioning in young children with cerebral palsy: functional skills, caregiver assistance, and modifications of the environment.

“International Handbook of Occupational Therapy Interventions” by Ingrid Söderback
from International Handbook of Occupational Therapy Interventions
by Ingrid Söderback
Springer International Publishing, 2014

The most vulnerable group are infants and young children, with 5–8% infants under 3 years being affected (Sampson and McCaskill 1985, Motala and Lockey 2004, Sicherer 2010).

“Food Biochemistry and Food Processing” by Benjamin K. Simpson, Leo M. L. Nollet, Fidel Toldrá, Gopinadhan Paliyath, Soottawat Benjakul, Y. H. Hui
from Food Biochemistry and Food Processing
by Benjamin K. Simpson, Leo M. L. Nollet, et. al.
Wiley, 2012

Groups considered high risk include young children (younger than age 3 years) as well as those with severe OSA documented on PSG; significant clinical sequelae of OSA (e.g., failure to thrive); or associated medical conditions, such as craniofacial syndromes, morbid obesity, and hypotonia.

“A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Sleep: Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Problems” by Jodi A. Mindell, Judith A. Owens
from A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Sleep: Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Problems
by Jodi A. Mindell, Judith A. Owens
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Strategies for improving epidermal barrier function in preterm infants with very low birthweight are listed in Box 52-4.

“Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant” by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
from Fanaroff and Martin’s Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant
by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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  • I think this is the reason I am so introverted… there was no one to understand me or my emotions after my parents separated.. I still keep blaming myself.. I have struggled for years to get back my self worth back. It has affected all my friendships and relationships.. I can’t correct my own childhood. But if I ever have children, I will always be available for my children..

  • I cried a lot watching this. I know my parents didn’t know how damaging their behaviors were. How do I heal myself as an adult?:’(

  • When i consider the plethora of neglect and abuse from my childhood, this video is pretty scary indeed. No wonder I am “from another planet” now

  • My father has been emotionally neglected by his own parents and has always had difficulties dealing with his emotions. I’m pretty sure he was or still is very depressed because of his traumas. He has been working all day everyday as long as I can remember, neglecting me, his only daughter, and my mom without even realizing.
    He is NOT a bad guy.
    But he continues the behavior of his parents, like not being involved in literally anything I do, then turning as cold as ice when I express my feelings, he’s trying to be “the dominant one” (apparently this is exactly what his father also did). I practically never saw him between the ages 3-9, only seeing a closed door which I wasn’t allowed to enter because I would disturb him. I just recently realized how distanced I am from him, I didn’t notice how I never shared my emotions or troubles with him, because I thought I would disturb his GREAT WORK. Now I am older and feel so alone with him when my mom is not around. I am trying to be better because I know he has had a hard life, but it gets so, so frustrating. I just don’t know what to do. He gets so mean sometimes and never apologizes. Is this what you call “daddy issues”?