Vehicle Seat Safety for Premature Infants

 

Kaity’s preemie car seat challenge 2

Video taken from the channel: Keli Thakur


 

Protecting Premature Babies in the Car

Video taken from the channel: MonkeySee


 

Car Seat Challenge to Go Home from the NICU

Video taken from the channel: IVF Twins Dad


 

“The Infant Car Seat Tolerance Screening” by Kathryn Gustafson for OPENPediatrics

httpv://youtu.be/-C_G-B-afM?rel=0&modestbranding=1

Video taken from the channel: OPENPediatrics


 

CarseatBlog.com: Preemie Carseat Demonstration

Video taken from the channel: CarseatBlog


 

Car Seat Safety for Low-birth Weight Babies

Video taken from the channel: Saint Peter’s Healthcare System


 

Preparing for preterm baby’s hospital discharge

Video taken from the channel: Sunnybrook Hospital


Car seat challenge tests, also known as car seat tolerance screenings (CSTS), are often used around the time of discharge for Early preterm infants who may not tolerate being positioned upright in a car seat without becoming apneic. If your pediatrician determines that it is safe for your baby to be in a semi-reclined position, follow these tips to safely position your baby in a traditional safety seat: Make sure you check the weight requirements on the car seat and that your baby weighs enough to use the seat. Infant-only car. Use a rear-facing car seat (one that faces ‘backwards’) until your baby is 10 kg (22 pounds) – usually about one year old. For smaller babies, make sure the car seat is not too big.

Look for a restraint with a distance of less than 25 cm (10 inches) between the lowest shoulder strap slots and the seat bottom (Figure 1). Figure 1). Background: The belief that late-preterm infants have similar cardiorespiratory maturity to term infants has led many institutions to limit car seat tolerance screens (CSTSs) to those born early preterm. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence and predictors of CSTS failure, focusing on late-preterm infants.

The safest place for your child’s car seat is the back seat, away from active air bags. If the car seat is placed in the front seat and the air bag inflates, it could hit the back of a rear-facing car seat — right where your child’s head is — and cause a serious or fatal injury. Who should get a Car Seat Test? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all babies born before 37 weeks and those weighing less than 2500g get a car seat test before going home from the hospital. Other babies who should get a car seat test are those who are: Going home on an apnea monitor; Going home on oxygen.

Most hospitals will require that parents have a car seat available that will safely support a baby weighing a minimum of 4 lbs. While there are about 25 popular brands of car seats meeting the 4lb weight minimum, some brands and models stand out for there safety and comfort features. Shop for preemie infant car seat online at Target. Free shipping on orders of $35+ and save 5% every day with your Target RedCard.

Car safety seats that are used correctly are 71% effective in preventing fatalities attributable to passenger car crashes in infants. 1 To ensure that preterm and low birth weight infants are transported safely, the proper selection and use of car safety seats or car beds are necessary. Your infant or toddler should ride in a rear-facing car safety seat as long as possible, until they reach the highest weight or height allowed by their seat.

Most convertible seats have limits that will allow children to ride rear-facing for two years or more.

List of related literature:

It is now recommended that all infants and toddlers ride in rearfacing car safety seats until they reach the age of 2 years or height recommended by the car seat manufacturer (Durbin and AAP Committee on Injury, Violence, Poison Prevention, 2011).

“Maternal Child Nursing Care” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier, 2013

It is now recommended that all infants and toddlers ride in rear­facing car safety seats until they reach the age of 2 years or the height recommended by the car seat manufacturer (Durbin and Committee on Injury, Violence, Poison Prevention, 2011).

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing9: Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing9: Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong
Elsevier/Mosby, 2013

Although federal safety standards do not specify the minimum weight of an infant and the appropriate type of restraint, newborns weighing 2000 g (4.4 lb) receive relatively good support in convertible seats with a seat back–to–crotch strap height of 14 cm (5.5 inches) or less.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

It has been reported that 25% of late preterm infants do not fit securely into standard car safety seats, and 12% of healthy late preterm infants have apneic or bradycardic events in their car seats (Merchant et al, 2001).

“Avery's Diseases of the Newborn E-Book” by Christine A. Gleason, Sherin Devaskar
from Avery’s Diseases of the Newborn E-Book
by Christine A. Gleason, Sherin Devaskar
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

However, with proper seating placement of the child within the car and usage of ageand size-appropriate car seats or booster seats, almost one-third of these deaths can be prevented, and injuries can be reduced by more than half (188–191).

“Brain Injury Medicine: Principles and Practice” by David B. Arciniegas, MD, M. Ross Bullock, MD, PHD, Douglas I. Katz, MD, Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, PHD, ABPP, Ross D. Zafonte, DO, Nathan D. Zasler, MD
from Brain Injury Medicine: Principles and Practice
by David B. Arciniegas, MD, M. Ross Bullock, MD, PHD, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2012

Baby should be kept in a rear­facing car seat until she’s 20 pounds and 1 year old (she must meet both qualifications before her seat gets turned toward the front).

“Your Baby's First Year For Dummies” by James Gaylord, Michelle Hagen
from Your Baby’s First Year For Dummies
by James Gaylord, Michelle Hagen
Wiley, 2011

Place an infant in the back seat of the vehicle in a rear-facing child safety seat for as long as possible, up to the height or weight limit of the particular seat you use.

“Auto Repair For Dummies” by Deanna Sclar
from Auto Repair For Dummies
by Deanna Sclar
Wiley, 2011

The National Center for Safe Transportation of Children with Special Needs (n.d.) sets forth some recommendations for car safety seat selection for premature and LBW infants (www. preventinjury.org/SNTmedCond.asp).

“Primary Care of the Child With a Chronic Condition E-Book” by Patricia Jackson Allen, Judith A. Vessey, Naomi Schapiro
from Primary Care of the Child With a Chronic Condition E-Book
by Patricia Jackson Allen, Judith A. Vessey, Naomi Schapiro
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP, 2018a) recommends the following: • Infants and toddlers should ride in a rear-facing car safety seat (Fig. 27.1) as long as possible, until they reach the highest weight or height allowed by their seat (see manufacturer’s directions).

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Car seat manufacturers must specify recommended minimum and maximum weights for the occupant; therefore, it is important to check the manufacturer’s recommendations before purchasing a car seat for a smaller infant.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition” by A. Judie
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition
by A. Judie
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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7 comments

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  • thank you for this video… my baby is born 6 weeks earlier…now i’m trying to educate myself on proper caring of him when he’s home… now he’s 1month 4days in NICU…hope to take him home soon

  • My daughter Lilly was born premature. She was born at 33 weeks and 6 days. She was in baby unit for over a week, shes growing so well now bless her shes over 2 months old and gained a lot of weight.

  • I was born 2 months before my actual due date since me and my mom were sick. Luckily she had gestational (I think) diabetes so I was 5 pounds. I have a slight deformity in my knees and teeth.

  • Awesome. Don’t buy too many tiny clothes. They grow like crazy and will be in regular size quickly. I had many years ago a 2 month premature baby

  • i dilivered 31 weks… and my baby also in NICU its been 12 days already… ������and i didnt hav a chance to hold him yet…ther are not allowing me… im just seing him in the window..

  • I hope my baby doesn’t come out unable to breath on her own. I just want to take her home right away. I’m scheduled to be induced on the 6th of November and she only weighs 4lbs 14oz. 4 more days and I don’t think she’s going to gain anything significant. I hope she’s at least 5lbs.

  • This is a great seat!•••> allmy.tips/ChiccoCseat?lL ❋    Well made, versatile and easy to use. I feel my child is very safe when he is in this seat.