Thumb Sucking Versus Pacifier Use

 

Thumb and Finger Sucking: What You Need to Know

Video taken from the channel: Health Science Channel


 

Thumb Sucking and Pacifier Use

Video taken from the channel: Petaluma Dental Group


 

Thumb sucking, a bad habit (kids’ edition) Lapointe dental centres

Video taken from the channel: Lapointe dental centres


 

How Thumb Sucking Affects Children’s Teeth

Video taken from the channel: Smile Council Orthodontics


 

How Pacifiers & Thumbsucking Can Affect Your Child’s Teeth

Video taken from the channel: St. Louis Children’s Hospital


 

Pacifiers and thumb-sucking all you need to know.

Video taken from the channel: Baby Care 101


 

Thumb Sucking, Pacifiers And Oral Health

Video taken from the channel: Delta Dental of New Jersey and Connecticut


Sucking a pacifier while sleeping may lower your baby’s risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Neither are perfect: Pacifiers can increase the risk of ear infections, but thumb-sucking can. The advantages of using a pacifier include being able to control when your child is allowed to use it and being able to take the pacifier away when it is no longer appropriate. But a young child who uses a pacifier may be more likely to get ear infections. An advantage of thumb-sucking is that it may not interfere with breastfeeding.

And children usually stop on their own between the ages of 3 to 5. Many parents of a thumb-sucking infant question whether they should substitute a pacifier for the thumb. So far, research does not show that one is preferable over the other.

Also, although parents can encourage a child to suck a pacifier rather than a thumb, they can’t control which the child will prefer. The Cons: “Both pacifier and thumb sucking are bad for your toddler’s teeth if these habits continue past age two or four. After that age, both habits become problematic. With pacifier use, there are times of day that are more teeth-friendly. Many parents of a thumb-sucking infant question whether they should substitute a pacifier for the thumb.

So far, research does not show that one is preferable over the other. Also, although parents can encourage a child to suck a pacifier rather than a thumb, they can’t control which the child will prefer. Many parents of a thumb-sucking infant question whether they should substitute a pacifier for the thumb.

So far, research does not show that one is preferable over the other. Also, although parents can encourage a child to suck a pacifier rather than a thumb, they can’t control which the child will prefer. Therefore, a pacifier is preferred over thumb or finger sucking. For newborns and infants, a newborn thumb vs pacifier is preferred to limit the risk of SIDS. For babies and toddlers between about six months and up to age two, you should introduce a pacifier to replace the thumb during the day.

Topic Overview. Many parents of a thumb-sucking infant question whether they should substitute a pacifier for the thumb. So far, research does not show that one is preferable over.

If your child sucks strongly on a pacifier or his thumb or fingers beyond 2 to 4 years of age, this behavior may affect the shape of his mouth or how his teeth are lining up. If your child stops sucking on a pacifier or his thumb or fingers before his permanent front teeth come in, there’s a good chance his bite will correct itself. thumbs. When an active thumb sucker removes his or her thumb from the mouth, a popping sound often is heard.

Some aggressive thumb suckers may cause problems with their primary (baby) teeth. BREAKING THE HABIT Pacifiers can affect the teeth in essentially the same way as does sucking on fingers and thumbs. However, pacifier use often is an easier habit to.

List of related literature:

Babies not given a pacifier will often become thumb-suckers for the same soothing effects, which can be good —thumbs are always readily accessible—or problematic—taking away a pacifier is easier than taking away a thumb when it’s time to break the habit.

“The Informed Parent: A Science-Based Resource for Your Child's First Four Years” by Tara Haelle, Emily Willingham, Ph.D.
from The Informed Parent: A Science-Based Resource for Your Child’s First Four Years
by Tara Haelle, Emily Willingham, Ph.D.
Penguin Publishing Group, 2016

Both pacifier use and thumb-sucking may also have significant cultural variations.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Some parents may perceive pacifiers as less damaging because they are discarded by 2 to 3 years of age, whereas thumb sucking may persist well into school-age years.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Some parents may perceive pacifiers as less damaging because they are discarded by 2 to 3 years old, but thumb sucking may persist well into the school-age years.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by David Wilson, Cheryl C Rodgers, Marilyn J. Hockenberry
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by David Wilson, Cheryl C Rodgers, Marilyn J. Hockenberry
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Thumb Sucking and Use of a Pacifier Sucking is infants’ chief pleasure and may not be satisfied by breastfeeding or bottle feeding.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition” by A. Judie
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition
by A. Judie
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Those of the pacifier set claim, however, that it is easier to “lose” the pacifier than the thumb; and intense thumb-sucking, if prolonged three to four years, may lead to orthodontic problems.

“The Baby Book, Revised Edition: Everything You Need to Know About Your Baby from Birth to Age Two” by Martha Sears, James Sears, William Sears, Robert W. Sears
from The Baby Book, Revised Edition: Everything You Need to Know About Your Baby from Birth to Age Two
by Martha Sears, James Sears, et. al.
Little, Brown, 2013

Your baby may discover their thumb for the first time, or they might suck their thumb or pacifier more often or for longer than they did before.

“The Wonder Weeks: A Stress-Free Guide to Your Baby's Behavior (6th Edition)” by Xaviera Plas-Plooij, Frans X. Plooij, Hetty van de Rijt
from The Wonder Weeks: A Stress-Free Guide to Your Baby’s Behavior (6th Edition)
by Xaviera Plas-Plooij, Frans X. Plooij, Hetty van de Rijt
Countryman Press, 2019

There is controversy about the thumb versus the pacifier for sucking.

“Your Baby's First Year Week by Week” by Glade B. Curtis, Judith Schuler
from Your Baby’s First Year Week by Week
by Glade B. Curtis, Judith Schuler
Hachette Books, 2010

One way to avoid thumb-sucking problems is by early use of an orthodontic pacifier, as the “binky” is more easy to remove from the child’s environment.

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by A.K. David, S.A. Fields, D.M. Phillips, J.E. Scherger, Robert Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by A.K. David, S.A. Fields, et. al.
Springer New York, 2002

Some parents find that one advantage of pacifier use is that the infant gives it up more quickly than a thumb or finger because it is not so easily accessible.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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6 comments

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  • When children experience open-bite, cross-bite, deep-bite, flared front teeth, spacing, etc., all of theses findings indicate that there is the structural problems in the child’s mouth. Before teeth erupt into the mouth, they begin to form within the gum structure. As the gum structure deforms, teeth will form into the wrong positions. As explained in this video, using a pacifier causes dental/orthodontic complications. This means that the pacifier is causing structural deformation of the mouth. There is increasing evidence that malformed oral structure, in fact, has significant adverse effects on overall health of the baby, in respect to breathing, middle ear function, sleep, speech, and so on.
    At present time, there seems to be no answer to why the pacifier causes all these problems. One answer is that the current pacifier industry has not fully understood how the mother’s breast works to safeguard the development of baby’s facial structures. I feel very strongly that there must be a fallacy in the design of current pacifier.

  • Visit http://www.ThumbSuckerSleepShirt.com

    The thumb sucker sleep shirt is perfect for infants and children starting at 9 months. This shirt prevents children from sucking their thumbs and fingers in a comfortable snug fitting sleep shirt, that also helps teach them an alternative self soothing behavior.

  • I’m twelve now.. i stop thumb sucking for about a month ago.. i stop because many ppl always mock me �� i know its hard to stop.. but i try..

  • Oddly enough, I sucked my thumb till I was almost 10 years old, and the different dentists I have gone to always say that my teeth are so straight I look like someone who had braces. I never had them once in my entire life.

    Guess I just won the genetic lottery with my chompers. Wish I could say the same for my nose, lol.

  • Thumb sucking is natural; it lowers my heart rate and has done NO HARM whatsoever to my dentition. There is a lot of fear mongering ‘oh no what will happen to my poor child if they don’t give up?’ Parents stop being so overbearing, and don’t you dare force your ‘bad habit’ dogma on anybody. Sucking your thumb cannot change the profile of your gum line, that is down to poor genetics. If you thought that was down to thumb sucking you have really bought into the dentist’s lies, how DAMAGING do you imagine simply sucking your thumb can be? If you are thinking about doing an ‘intervention’ just don’t. It’s their thumb they can suck it if they want. I’ve never had braces. Thumb sucking didn’t affect me negatively whatsoever and I’ve been doing it regularly and often all my life.

  • I have a 4,5 yo daughter. She still sucking her thumb, but when I showed her several videos about the effects, she is stopping….Thank you for the video.��