The way a C-Section Affects Breastfeeding and seven Strategies for Success

 

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Start breastfeeding as soon as possible after your c-section. If you have an epidural or spinal anesthesia, you’ll be awake so you may be able to breastfeed right away. However, if it’s necessary to have general anesthesia, your recovery will take longer.

If you can’t breastfeed right away, ask to hold your baby skin-to-skin. Then, put the baby to the breast as soon as you safely can. 6 Effective Tips For Breastfeeding After a C-Section 1. Meet with a lactation consultant while pregnant. Knowing what to expect from breastfeeding after delivery is vital if you’re planning on exclusive nursing. The first couple of weeks of breastfeeding are not easy, doesn’t matter if you gave birth naturally or via c-section.

Here are seven tips for success. Start breastfeeding as soon as possible after your c-section surgery. If you have epidural or spinal anesthesia, you’ll be awake so you may be able to breastfeed right away.

However, if it’s necessary to have general anesthesia, your recovery will take longer. You are asked to take pain medication after a cesarean section. If you are still in pain, it will take some time for your body to heal thus making your breastfeeding more uncomfortable.

Some of the pain medication may also be passed on to your breast milk, making your baby sleepy. Some moms who have had a C-section find that their milk comes in a little later than expected, probably due to the extra stress of surgery. You can keep your milk supply on track by: Cuddling skin-to-skin with your baby as often as you can. Staring those first nursing sessions as soon as possible. Breastfeeding actually burns about 300 to 500 calories per day, whether you deliver vaginally or with a C-section.

This might help you shed the baby weight a. Breast-feeding and pumping: 7 tips for success. Breast-feeding is a commitment. If you’re pumping, follow simple tips for maintaining your milk supply, from pumping often to drinking plenty of fluids.

By Mayo Clinic Staff. The current study recognizes that cesarean section negatively impacts on the initiation of breastfeeding, and aims to determine the level of influence. Specifically, the aim was to identify factors that influence mothers’ breastfeeding initiation in the first 24 hours after birth.

Love your blog! My daughter had an emergency c-section 5 years ago and a preemie baby under 3 lbs, we could’ve used your tips! I really liked preparing your Home, asking for help, and get moving without exercising practical but overlooked necessities!

The tips. Babies born via c-section may be somewhat drowsy and lethargic, especially if the mother was exposed to anesthetics for a prolonged period of time during labor. This doesn’t mean that breastfeeding won’t be successful, but it can mean that her milk may take a little longer.

List of related literature:

Breastfeeding will stimulate the release of oxytocin, which will initiate uterine contractions and thus increase uterine involution and reduce the risk of postpartum haemorrhage.

“Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series” by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
from Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series
by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2012

F. Prevention of bleeding (guideline 17): breastfeed; assess fundus and massage as needed; expel clots if present once fundus is firm; assess bladder and encourage voiding; allow placenta to separate naturally.

“Study Guide for Maternity & Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Study Guide for Maternity & Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Afterpains: Breastfeeding with newborn sucking causes the posterior pituitary to secrete oxytocin, stimulating the let-down reflex; uterine contractions are also stimulated, leading to afterpains, which will occur for the first few days postpartum.

“Study Guide for Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, David Wilson
from Study Guide for Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Effects of sucking and skin-to-skin contact on maternal ACTH and cortisol levels during the second day postpartum-influence of epidural analgesia and oxytocin in the perinatal period.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Clinicians are more likely to perform partial frenotomy if they believe that ankyloglossia contributes to poor infant sucking and other breastfeeding problems, such as insufficient infant weight gain or sore nipples/ recurrent mastitis in the mother.

“Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care E-Book” by Grant C. Fowler
from Pfenninger and Fowler’s Procedures for Primary Care E-Book
by Grant C. Fowler
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Clinicians are more likely to perform partial frenotomy if they believe that ankyloglossia contributes to poor infant sucking and other breast-feeding problems, such as insufficient infant weight gain or sore nipples or recurrent mastitis in the mother.

“Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care E-Book: Expert Consult” by John L. Pfenninger, Grant C. Fowler
from Pfenninger and Fowler’s Procedures for Primary Care E-Book: Expert Consult
by John L. Pfenninger, Grant C. Fowler
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Early (in the first hour after birth) and frequent breastfeeding are encouraged for optimal functioning of both the infant and the mother for the following reasons: • Suckling stimulates uterine contractions, aids in the expulsion of the placenta, and helps to control maternal blood loss.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

During each of these visits the midwife/ FHW checks temperature, pulse and respirations of the mother, examines her breasts, checks the progress of normal involution of uterus, examines lochia for any abnormality, checks urine and bowels and advices on perineal toileting.

“A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing” by Annamma Jacob
from A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing
by Annamma Jacob
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2018

(b) Contributing factors are: [i] Waiting too long between feedings, poor positioning, poor latching-on, or sucking dysfunction [ii] Limiting length of feeding times does not prevent sore nipples.

“Core Curriculum for Maternal-Newborn Nursing E-Book” by AWHONN, Susan Mattson, Judy E. Smith
from Core Curriculum for Maternal-Newborn Nursing E-Book
by AWHONN, Susan Mattson, Judy E. Smith
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Skin-to-skin contact and early breast feeding may facilitate the delivery of the placenta in the third stage by stimulating endogenous maternal oxytocin release.

“Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book” by Jane Coad, Melvyn Dunstall
from Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book
by Jane Coad, Melvyn Dunstall
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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26 comments

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  • I had to have an emergency c section after 11 hours of labour and 40 mins of pushing. I was so mad at myself for not being able to push my son out naturally. And I hadn’t done any research on sections because I had my mind set on a natural birth. I feel like such a failure because of it. Such a mixed bag of emotions

  • Hey Bridget: i had my 1st baby by c-section. I had to go through 15hrs labor, even after having proper dilation as i wasnt feeling the urge to push the baby i was put into c-section
    Is there any chance for me to try for VBAC? I am 30. 5ft 2inch tall and right now weighing 72kg

  • I had a successful VBAC after two c-sections on March 12th of this year. The recovery was so much easier. And I’m glad I got to have the positive birth experience that I have dreamed of.

  • Update: had successful VBAC 5/15/2020. The story is under comments from my original post if interested. Couldn’t copy and paste here but wanted to update bc I know how hearing other experiences is helpful in making your decision. Good luck with your personal journey!

  • Hi, I’m 27 weeks pregnant, I had one C-section about 13 months ago. My blood pressure in this pregnancy is on the border line, please what can I do to help me to go to VBAC and if I have a high blood pressure can I still go to VBAC?

  • Please read the reviews on Aniball and Epi-no Delphine Plus birth aids. First time mums who have ‘Opened Doors For Baby to 10cm’ giving birth to a first time baby 4.4kg (because went to 42 weeks) had a normal birth with no episiotomy. Similarly, mums who baby has its back to mum’s back i.e. ‘back to back’ babies (Occipito Posterior babies or OP babies) in first birth give birth normally, because some of the hard work of birth canal widening has been done before the start of the birth. Painlessly stretching skin over a week is a standard technique in plastic surgery, now used in birth. Please view my YouTube channel medical videos from Birth Explained for children to Sheehan’s syndrome and MRSA.

  • This is my 2nd TOLAC and I truly believe this time I have taken all steps and preparation to finally get a VBAC! I can’t wait to share my story in the Facebook group also! Thanks for this video! Sips RRLT ��

  • I had my 4th baby this morning. All the while sending so much gratitude to you. Thank you for all your videos, advice and expertise. She was born at home and is just perfect. ��������

  • You are an incredible labor coach! I find your videos super interesting, even though I’m not pregnant I think it’s important to be prepared ��

  • I have gestational diabetes! They just found out 2 weeks ago, I have now 16 days left till my due date and I really want a vbac! What do I do? Is it safe for me?

  • I gave birth Vaginally birth my first pregnancy and my 2nd the placenta ripped away and I had to have an emergency c section. I’m hoping for my 3rd to be a vaginal birth.

  • Such great information! I ended up having an emergency c-section after complications during labor. We weren’t fully prepared because we had hoped to delivery vaginally but we also weren’t naive to that it could happen. I knew it was going to be different but I was not fully prepared for the pain afterwards! I had SO much swelling afterwards (nothing hardly fit me) and quite a bit of pain (even 2 years later my incision is still sensitive at times). It’s a major surgery butI didn’t have guilt and I would do over and over and over again!!!

  • I am ur new subscriber. I am also planning for vbac. As per this video, we are supposed to have atleast 18 months time gap between delivery but mine will br only 17 months. Ultrasound report says my placenta is fundal anterior. I want to know that, May I still hope for vbac. My previous c section was due to baby in breech position.

  • Very useful and informative video.Thanks for sharing.I have also made few informative videos related to obs and gynae and would like to share with you.

  • I thank Allaah first, the Lord and Creator.

    After Him, I thank you. Your tips and advice helped me have a spontaneous and unmedicated Vba2c.

    I wish you success in your endeavors. May God guide you to everything good.

  • My doctor didn’t even give me the option just said, “well your hips wouldn’t let him come down so we are just going to schedule another C-section” I got to 7 cm with my first. I feel like I am a good candidate. Im only 22. And healthy:/. Not sure if I should get a new provider. Its just im 23 weeks along and with Covid 19 and so many uncertainties im not sure what to do:(

    Edit: You literally answered all my questions ��

  • I am super emotional rightnoww.. The first bit of information you gave up until 4:00 i think. That basically stated that i’m in the ‘good start zone’, made me cry so much! I am currently 12 weeks 3 days and reading allot of information of what is to come. Videos like these really help me with all the orientation i’m doing! Anything positive can make me cry at this point ����.

  • When I found out I was pregnant my first thought was I want a midwife/doula and I want to birth this baby naturally. Unfortunately after doing my research they’re so expensive and I’m in a very low income area also I’m high risk so I’m really scared of my biggest fear coming to light which is having a csection… I’m due January 11th so I hope things go well I just really hope things can go a little good.

  • Thank you SO much for this video! I am 33 weeks pregnant and hoping for a VBAC. I’ve been up tossing and turning for so many nights trying to decide if I should just schedule a c-section or push through with a vbac. This helped me make my decision! I was told that the shape of my pelvis was too small… what can I do to help with this reoccurring issue? Thank you!

  • I had a csection with my fisrt baby she was 1week late 10yrs later im having anothr baby im 39yrs now and yhe doctor does not want me to go past 39weeks is this rite? I thought if baby is not in any kind of stress its good to wait till baby is ready???

  • I tried to move around while I was being monitored but they kept losing the heart beat as soon as I would get outta bed then they would come in an yell at me to get into the bed and lecture me about how I doing something wrong I was a low risk pregnancy nothing wrong with me or baby this second time around I will not be bossed around

  • I had an induced vaginal birth with my first. Ended up with an episiotomy + 3rd degree tear after 5 hours of pushing. It was pretty awful. My son was the only good memory I have of it (but I was so exhausted and shell shocked I didn’t really bond with him till the next day). My second was a 32w CS that was almost 3 years ago. I’m now 36w5d with #3 and just scheduled a repeat CS bc this baby girl is still breech like her sister was (and not enough amniotic fluid to have an ECV). That’s ok bc I kind of wanted a repeat CS bc I found the experience (other than the prematurity) and recovery a lot less traumatic and taxing compared to my vaginal. I also just want a planned fullterm csection where I get to hold my baby afterwards and still have that typical newborn experience. I might have another baby but probably not since my husband insists he’s getting snipped.

    Other than being breech at almost 37w, I was a perfect candidate on paper for a vbac considering I had a prior vaginal birth.

  • Amazing video. Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us! I wish you could travel around to help me to give birth:/
    I love your channel!
    31 weeks, I am starting the positions you suggested today! God bless.

  • I’ve had two csections it will be three years the 23rd since my last c section hoping to have a successful VBAC in November with my little boy but I’m also terrified something bad is going to happen ��

  • Thank you so much for this video Bridget. My daughter was born December 2019 in a traumatic emergency C-section after being induced at 41 weeks. She came out 100% healthy but I had lots of complications following. This video gives me so much hope that I may be able to have a vaginal birth someday. Thank you for all your wonderfully educational videos ��

  • Thank you for this video! I’m 31 weeks with my 3rd baby. My first 2 babies were cesareans. First one was an emergency born at 33 weeks and second was “once a cesarean always a cesarean” and I didn’t know better nor fight it. The 2 were 28 months apart. Now it’s been 6 years since my second baby was born. I match your list of what makes me a candidate besides having 2 past cesareans. My OB personally supports me having a TOLAC but the OB office and linked hospital is not supportive, so I will be going to a different hospital when I’m in labor. This other hospital is supportive but I won’t know any doctors and will have whoever is on call. They did say that they want me to have an epidural just in case I need a cesarean but I know that lowers my chances of being successful. Thoughts on that? And my next question is, do you think having a 6 year gap increases my chances of success?