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The Best Consequences for Teens Who Break Curfew 1. Temporarily Reduce the Curfew Time. If your teen arrives home 20 minutes late, make his curfew 20 minutes earlier for 2. Create Added Restrictions. If your teen comes home more than an hour late, or he breaks curfew a few times. Set consequences for missed curfews When you set a curfew, it’s important to create consequences for breaking it. For example, you might roll your child’s curfew back by 30 minutes if.

Apparently, for an older adolescent who still wants to live at home, when following curfew becomes a residency requirement, it can catch the young person’s attention. However, as one reade. Here are some possible consequences: For every ten minutes late for curfew, your teen needs to come home ten minutes early for the next time.

Teen loses permission to go out the following week. Teen loses access to the car for a weekend. Decide ahead of time what the consequence will be if your teen should break curfew again. Some parents prefer to “ground” their teen, perhaps not getting to go out the following weekend, while others prefer to rollback privileges, such as requiring a 11p.m. curfew after they missed the 11:30p.m. curfew. Of course, setting a curfew to the teenager’s satisfaction is hard to do, because a curfew limits social freedom.

Often there are two curfews: for the school night and for when school is not in. Juvenile curfew laws are local ordinances that prohibit people of a certain age (usually under 18) from being in public or in a business establishment during certain hours (such as between 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m.). The legislative intent behind juvenile curfew laws is usually social order goals such as prevention of crimes involving juveniles, protection of minors from predators, and. Consequences.

A police officer will escort those who break the curfew home. After the first offense, it is the parents’ responsibility to provide or pay for transportation. If the teen continues to break curfew, he may become a ward of the state and treated as an offender.

Additional Information. Loss of Privileges. You must take something away from your teen that he or she really enjoys to make this consequence effective.

It should cause your teen some discomfort to lose the privilege, but not be out of proportion to the misbehaviour. As an example, don’t just take away their phone just because they were rude. Consequences for Teens: Sometimes we just need a break. My teen takes a lot of walks/bike rides and skateboard rides. I bet his hormones are just racing around that brain of his.

He’s somewhat irrational as a 16-year-old boy. Frankly, I need a good cooling off too. Giving kids space is a natural consequence that works.

List of related literature:

Teenagers feel that they would be fine if parents left them alone forever, but parents feel that curfews must be set, schoolwork completed, phone bills acknowledged, dirty clothes picked up, and siblings restrained from beating each other into unconsciousness.

“Get Out of My Life: The bestselling guide to the twenty-first-century teenager” by Suzanne Franks, Tony Wolf
from Get Out of My Life: The bestselling guide to the twenty-first-century teenager
by Suzanne Franks, Tony Wolf
Profile, 2014

Disobeying curfew: returning home after specified time.

“Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents” by Alan E Kazdin
from Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents
by Alan E Kazdin
Oxford University Press, 2005

For example, if a teen comes home 1 hour late for curfew, a consequence might be a 1-hour-earlier curfew next time, rather than mowing the lawn for the whole summer, which seems more extreme than the violation and is unrelated.

“DBT® Skills Manual for Adolescents” by Jill H. Rathus, Alec L. Miller, Marsha M. Linehan
from DBT® Skills Manual for Adolescents
by Jill H. Rathus, Alec L. Miller, Marsha M. Linehan
Guilford Publications, 2014

reluctant to use their authority—assuming they have any left—to set curfews or tell them they can’t go to parties with alcohol.

“The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement” by Jean M. Twenge, W. Keith Campbell
from The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement
by Jean M. Twenge, W. Keith Campbell
Atria Books, 2009

For instance, if you miss curfew, your parents might ground you for 2 months, take away your cell phone, and remind you of the mistake constantly.”

“Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Suicidal Adolescents” by Alec L. Miller, Jill H. Rathus, Marsha M. Linehan, Charles R. Swenson
from Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Suicidal Adolescents
by Alec L. Miller, Jill H. Rathus, et. al.
Guilford Publications, 2006

If the teenager “persists” in staying out too late, the parent might raise the punishment—after all, the parent seeks compliance with the rules of the house and it might be necessary to raise the punishment in order to achieve it.

“Rethinking Criminal Law” by George P. Fletcher
from Rethinking Criminal Law
by George P. Fletcher
Oxford University Press, 2000

In other cases, such as breaking curfew, immediate consequences are not possible, but the consequence should occur at the next opportunity that the teen has for that privilege.

“Smart But Scattered Teens: The Executive Skills Program for Helping Teens Reach Their Potential” by Richard Guare, Peg Dawson, Colin Guare
from Smart But Scattered Teens: The Executive Skills Program for Helping Teens Reach Their Potential
by Richard Guare, Peg Dawson, Colin Guare
Guilford Publications, 2012

enforcing a new curfew.

“Police Officer Exam For Dummies” by Raymond Foster, Tracey Biscontini
from Police Officer Exam For Dummies
by Raymond Foster, Tracey Biscontini
Wiley, 2011

ancy, running away, incorrigibility, curfew violations and drinking alcohol.

“Teen 2.0: Saving Our Children and Families from the Torment of Adolescence” by Robert Epstein
from Teen 2.0: Saving Our Children and Families from the Torment of Adolescence
by Robert Epstein
Linden Publishing, 2010

The issue of curfew provides parents with an ideal way of promoting self-discipline, restraint, goal-setting, good decision-making, delay of gratification, responsibility, and trust.

“Teen-Proofing: Fostering Responsible Decision Making in Your Teenager” by John Rosemond
from Teen-Proofing: Fostering Responsible Decision Making in Your Teenager
by John Rosemond
Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2000

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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  • Okay noone drunk or high would say “Hey best friend of 2 years can you push me off this 6 story high bridge at any moment let it be a surprise!”

  • Clearly she wanted to jump that’s why her ass was standing over the ledge this isn’t All the girls fault her pushed her the girl made a decision to stand on that ledge and attempted to jump

  • I never had a curfew and I never set a curfew for my daughter. It was a situation by situation thing. She also could call me and ask to stay later or earlier depending on her.

  • Taylor Smith is not someone you want for a friend. After the assault she still feels she did nothing wrong. Jordon definitely did not ask Taylor to give her a push. Lies. The “ball is not in her court”. You did the deed and now it’s time for YOU to make amends if you’re any kind of compassionate human.

  • Curfews are highly overrated. Kids deserve the right to be individuals. The worst thing a parent can do is drive their kids away from their home. Love is what makes a good home. Limiting a child’s time can be a reason for the child to not want to spend more time @ home. I’m not trying to be mean though. I’m just being honest.

  • do you have to show the clip literally 102939 times in a 2 minute video. Jeez. Otherwise, I’m really glad the girl didn’t die, because she definitely could have. Obviously the other girl didn’t INTEND to hurt or kill her friend, but she’s still a dang idiot. Who pushes someone, EVER.

  • She clearly said that she didn’t want her to push her off and she didn’t care what she wanted so she just went for it she is not real friend and she should be ashamed of herself because of what she did.

  • HEY!�� grounded?! I’m 13 and sometimes i come home like 12:30am. Aand they’re just okay with it��. But yeah, i live in the Faroe Islands, in a city with 1500 people��. So literally nothing can happen to me.

  • “Jordan, I’m going to push you.”
    “No.”
    *Does it anyway*

    The part where she says that she didn’t think about the consequences proves that she didn’t care.

  • I love how she gave some advice on “communicate with your parents” and she took the blame for not being home on time. Even though you never know when a concert is over, yet she could’ve used Ellie’s phone or Ellie’s moms.