The Security of Taking Hormonal Contraception While Breastfeeding

 

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Hormonal birth control Birth control pills that only contain progesterone may be recommended, as they are unlikely to affect milk production adversely. According to the Infant Risk Center. Yes, if you’re breastfeeding, you can safely use hormonal methods. They won’t hurt you or your baby.

You can start using the shot, implant, Skyla and Mirena IUDs, and some types of birth control pills (called mini-pills) right after giving birth. You may be able to get an implant or IUD in the hospital or at your postpartum checkup. Women may be wary of trying a hormonal birth control method while breastfeeding, but there are effective birth control options that do not interfere with the production or integrity of breast milk. Barrier methods such as male and female condoms are safe to use while breastfeeding since they do not introduce hormones. Since the hormonal IUDs contain only the hormone progesterone, both types are considered safe birth control options for breastfeeding mothers.

The copper IUD is the non-hormonal option. It’s a small coil wrapped in copper that is placed in the uterus. It is effective in preventing pregnancy.

Women who use birth control may themselves feel some side effects from a hormonal birth control methods, like tender breasts and nausea. However, no study has shown that taking birth control while breastfeeding. This form of birth control has estrogen and progestin. Because you’re breastfeeding, your doctor may not want you to use it for the first 6 weeks after you have your baby.

Barrier Methods. Smoking and birth control pills don’t always mix. If you’re over 35 and a smoker, you shouldn’t use the combination pill or any other kind of birth control that contains the hormone estrogen.

You can take. Barrier methods of birth control include diaphragms, condoms (male and female), spermicides, diaphragms, and cervical caps. These methods of contraception have no effect on milk. This leads to the question of what birth control pill is good for breastfeeding mothers. Hormonal pills are generally either progestin-only contraceptives or a combination type.

Although both. Contraceptives that contain only progestin are compatible with breastfeeding and are a safe option, assuming there’s no medical reason you can’t use this hormone. On the other hand, combined.

List of related literature:

Barrier methods (condoms and diaphragms), intrauterine devices (IUDs), and progestin-only pills and injections (mini-pill and Depo-Provera) don’t interfere with breastfeeding.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Use of hormonal contraceptives in breastfeeding women raises questions about maternal-fetal transfer of hormones, but the principal concerns relate to the effect on milk production and risk to the mother.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, Jay D. Iams, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Lesley Frazier
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Although progestin and estrogen are approved by the AAP for use in breastfeeding mothers, it is possible that estrogen-containing contraceptives may affect a mother’s milk supply and therefore a progestin-only medication (minipill) may be a better choice, at least until 6 months postpartum.

“Krause and Mahan’s Food and the Nutrition Care Process E-Book” by Janice L Raymond, Kelly Morrow
from Krause and Mahan’s Food and the Nutrition Care Process E-Book
by Janice L Raymond, Kelly Morrow
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Safe use of birth control while breastfeeding.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Contraceptives that will not affect lactation in the early postpartum period such as intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) and non-hormonal methods are the choices in the first 6 months following delivery.

“A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing” by Annamma Jacob
from A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing
by Annamma Jacob
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2018

The contraceptives least likely to affect breastfeeding and milk production are the nonhormonal methods such as the lactational amenorrhea method, natural family planning, barrier methods (diaphragm/cap, spermicides, condoms), and intrauterine devices.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Based on the absence of data suggesting harm to the infant or mother and the contraceptive benefits of early initiation, some experts recommend initiation of progestin-only pills or DMPA before hospital discharge and no later than the third postpartum week, regardless of lactation status.53

“Williams Textbook of Endocrinology E-Book” by Shlomo Melmed, Kenneth S. Polonsky, P. Reed Larsen, Henry M. Kronenberg
from Williams Textbook of Endocrinology E-Book
by Shlomo Melmed, Kenneth S. Polonsky, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

For women with mental disorders, the benefits of breast feeding must be balanced against the risks to the infant from exposure to medications.

“Textbook of Medical Psychiatry” by Paul Summergrad, M.D., David A. Silbersweig, M.D., Philip R. Muskin, M.D., John Querques, M.D.
from Textbook of Medical Psychiatry
by Paul Summergrad, M.D., David A. Silbersweig, M.D., et. al.
American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2020

Breastfeeding women may use the lactational amenorrhea method, alone or with other forms of contraception, for the first six months postpartum.

“New Dimensions in Women's Health” by Linda Lewis Alexander, Judith H. LaRosa, Helaine Bader, Susan Garfield
from New Dimensions in Women’s Health
by Linda Lewis Alexander, Judith H. LaRosa, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC, 2009

The lactational amenorrhea method (LAM) is 98% effective in preventing pregnancy during the first 6 months postpartum if the mother is exclusively or almost exclusively breastfeeding, the interval between feedings is less than 6 hours, and the mother has not resumed menstruation (WHO, 2009).

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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5 comments

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  • Thanks for your video! Just one question: My baby is 2 months old and I breastfeed every 3 to 4 hours during the days and nights but he only feeds for no more than 5 minutes on each sitting. Sometimes he last longer but that does not happens very often. Would exclusive breastfeeding prevent pregnancy under those conditions?

  • Thanks so much for this video, love it! I just discovered your channel from your Q&A with Derek and loveee that you talk about these things and it is so helpful!! I also really liked your skincare vid! I am currently on the pill (very reluctantly went on it a few years ago but have learnt recently how bad it is on your gut health which is a struggle for me so looking at going off it) and have been wanting to look at non-hormonal options and literally didn’t even know most of these existed so thanks heaps! �� I am looking at possibly the Copper IUD (am booked into the doctor to discuss what is best for me).. I’m the same as someone commented below, would like to look at FAM but don’t have the time or energy for that unfortunately.��. Do you have any advice on going off the pill/ what you can do to prevent any negative side-effects/ ‘comedown’s? Those aren’t the right words but I hope you get what I mean? �� Love all your content so far!

  • I love the idea of FAM, but my life is wayyy too hectic to do it right �� I opted for the copper IUD (with heavy existing periods so RIP iron levels). Thanks for the video!

  • When I was in school they didn’t go over birth control �� I had to learn on my own and some of them I didn’t know about until I was married! If I had to do it all over again, I would still use the pill. It was easy ☺️. Thanks Crystal! ♥️

  • Thanks for another brilliant video. And thank you for yesterday on Dereks live Q&A you answered my super chat about being a new YouTuber. Really appreciated the advice xx