The Cognitive Advantages of Breastfeeding

 

What are the health benefits of breastfeeding?

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New study says there are no long-term cognitive benefits to breastfeeding

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Breastfeeding and Cognitive Development

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Study says there’s no long-term cognitive benefit to breastfeeding

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Ask Dr. Nandi: Study shows no long-term cognitive benefit to breastfeeding

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Breastfeeding and Epigenetics: Long-term Health and Inheritance Effects of Feeding Human Milk

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Alcohol, Breastfeeding, and Cognitive Outcomes in Children

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There are many recognized benefits of breastfeeding. However, there is still much debate over whether or not breastfeeding gives children a cognitive advantage. Cognitive ability refers to mental processes such as thinking, remembering, and making decisions. It also includes creativity, imagination, and behavior.

While the health benefits of breastfeeding are clear, evidence that the practice improves a child’s thinking skills is more mixed. A comprehensive 2007 review, for example, found that the cognitive effects of breastfeeding are small and short-lived. But a new study suggests it does bolster brain development for at least one subset of children. Other studies suggest that breastfeeding may reduce the risk for certain allergic diseases, asthma, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. It also may help improve an infant’s cognitive development.

However, more research is needed to confirm these findings. For more specific information about the health benefits of breastfeeding, visit one of the following resources: American Academy of. Benefits of breastfeeding for your baby 1. Breastfed babies may suffer fewer infections Breastmilk may provide babies with protection against infections. A 2. Breastfed babies may have fewer allergies and respiratory diseases Breastfeeding your baby may also help prevent 3. Breastfed babies.

Study shows no long-term cognitive benefit to breastfeeding. There are many scientifically proven benefits to breastfeeding. Breast milk contains antibodies that help your baby fight off viruses and bacteria.

Breastfeeding lowers your baby’s risk of having asthma or allergies. Here are 11 science-based benefits of breastfeeding that are amazing for you and for your little one. Breastfeeding benefits for baby. 1. Breast milk provides ideal nutrition for babies. Benefits of Breastfeeding Benefits for Baby.

Breast milk provides all the nutrition your baby needs for the first six months of life. No additional food or water is recommended, so it makes feeding your baby easy. Your breast milk contains the perfect blend of nutrients, fat, and protein for your baby to grow at just the right rate.

Psychological benefits to baby continue even after breastfeeding ceases. For mother, the soothing effect of oxytocin released during breastfeeding has been noted by researchers to lead to a significantly lower incidence of child mistreatment or child neglect. Better measurement of the health and cognitive benefits of breastfeeding by using sibling comparisons to reduce sample selection bias. Data We use data on the breastfeeding history, physical and emotional health, academic performance, cognitive ability, and demographic characteristics of 16,903 adolescents from the first (1994) wave of the. In the analysis of 20 studies which compared cognitive development, it was determined that breastfeeding was associated with significantly higher scores for cognitive development than artificial feeding and that the developmental benefits of breastfeeding increased with duration of feeding.

This benefit was strongest for children of low birth.

List of related literature:

The purported benefits of breastfeeding include lower rates of asthma, eczema, allergy, obesity, and infections, along with higher IQ scores.

“Brain Health From Birth: Nurturing Brain Development During Pregnancy and the First Year” by Rebecca Fett
from Brain Health From Birth: Nurturing Brain Development During Pregnancy and the First Year
by Rebecca Fett
Franklin Fox Publishing LLC, 2019

There is a large literature on the relationship between breast­feeding and a variety of health and other early childhood outcomes, including stomach and respiratory infections, asthma, obesity, diabetes, and cognitive development.

“Research Methods in Practice: Strategies for Description and Causation” by Dahlia K. Remler, Gregg G. Van Ryzin
from Research Methods in Practice: Strategies for Description and Causation
by Dahlia K. Remler, Gregg G. Van Ryzin
SAGE Publications, 2014

Breastfeeding offers an overwhelming number of health benefits for a baby (from preventing allergies, obesity, and illness to promoting brain development) and for its mother (breastfeeding is linked to a speedier recovery postpartum and possibly a reduced risk of breast cancer later on in life).

“What to Expect When You're Expecting 4th Edition” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What to Expect When You’re Expecting 4th Edition
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

The study, which used the McCarthy scales, showed that the duration of breastfeeding was correlated with general cognition, verbal and quantitative scores, and memory, regardless of socioeconomic status, sex, or pesticide exposure.

“Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession” by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
from Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession
by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

This study demonstrated the importance of improving medical providers’ knowledge about breastfeeding and medical indications for supplementation, as well as the necessity of correcting misinformation on the part of the mother.

“Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician” by Marsha Walker
from Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician
by Marsha Walker
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Breastfeeding may also improve cognitive development and decrease the risk of obesity in adulthood.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition” by A. Judie
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition
by A. Judie
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

In keeping with the theory, the researchers postulated that self-efficacy expectancies are based on the mother’s previous breastfeeding experience, observations of successful breastfeeding, encouragement received from others, and the mother’s state of wellness.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

There is a growing body of empirical evidence that shows wide-ranging health benefits to both mother and infant from the practice of prolonged breastfeeding, including a stronger immune system and greater physical health later in life.

“The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Schema Therapy: Theory, Research, and Practice” by Michiel van Vreeswijk, Jenny Broersen, Marjon Nadort
from The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Schema Therapy: Theory, Research, and Practice
by Michiel van Vreeswijk, Jenny Broersen, Marjon Nadort
Wiley, 2015

Breastfeeding and breast milk promote optimal somatic growth and metabolic competence; are necessary for optimal cognitive development; enhance infant responses to infection and modulates inflammatory responses; and enhance mother-infant bonding.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Breastfeeding enhances cognitive development.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Mark B Landon, Joe Leigh Simpson, Deborah A Driscoll
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Well this is wrong and diceteful. They protested abortion not breats feeding. Also I find it funny the left cares about babies now that it’s perfect slander on trump

  • In Quran it’s mentioned that non siblings who have breastfed as babies from the same woman, that they automatically become siblings-by-breastfeeding because human milk, and therefore the Quran then clearly and strictly forbids marriage between them.