Taking care of Your and yourself Newborn Postpartum

 

Caring for Yourself and Your Baby After Birth (French) Childbirth Series

Video taken from the channel: Global Health Media Project


 

Postpartum Mindset // How to Process Your Birth & Overcome the Baby Blues

Video taken from the channel: The Parenting Junkie


 

Caring for Yourself and Your Baby After Birth (Spanish) Childbirth Series

Video taken from the channel: Global Health Media Project


 

Caring for Yourself and Your Baby After Birth Childbirth Series

Video taken from the channel: Global Health Media Project


 

Routine NEWBORN Care after HOSPITAL BIRTH | Birth Doula

Video taken from the channel: Bridget Teyler


 

How to Look After Yourself After Having a Baby

Video taken from the channel: Epworth HealthCare


 

HOW TO TAKE CARE OF A NEWBORN BABY NEWBORN 101

Video taken from the channel: Taylor Raine


Caring for Yourself and Your Newborn Postpartum Diapering. Whether you use cloth diapers, disposables, or a combination, your newborn will usually need at least 8–12 Umbilical Cord Care. Hospital staff in labor and delivery and your baby’s pediatrician should tell you exactly how to Bathing.

Note: This article is adapted from Life Will Never Be the Same: The Real Mom’s Postpartum Survival Guide, by BabyCenter medical advisor Diane Sanford, PhD, and Ann Dunnewold, PhD.. Ways you can take care of yourself. If you’re like most new moms, it may seem nearly impossible to find time for yourself with a new baby in the house – but only by taking care of yourself can you give your baby. In the meantime, here’s what you can do for an easier transition: 1. Get plenty of rest. Get as much sleep as possible to cope with tiredness and fatigue.

Your baby may wake up every two 2. Seek help. Don’t hesitate to accept help from family and friends during the postpartum period, as well as. Your Guide to Postpartum Care Some people return home from the hospital without a baby for various reasons. However, postpartum care is still a vital part of their pregnancy journey.

This booklet provides important information for personal care in a way that is sensitive to the circumstances. Included Topics: Postpartum Health. Coronavirus (COVID-19) Postpartum Care at Home: Caring for yourself and your newborn 2/3 Your baby should sleep in the same room as you to help establish bonding and breastfeeding.

Your baby should sleep in a crib or bassinet placed at least two metres (six feet) away from your bed. To speed healing and ease discomfort: • Keep the area clean with plain soap and water during your regular bath or shower. • In the first few days, an ice pack can help reduce swelling. • Allow air to circulate by going without a pad for an hour or so each day. Do things that you enjoy or help you relax such as reading, taking a bath, talking with friends, walking, yoga, deep breathing. Take time for your relationship. If you have a partner, your relationship may change after your baby is born.

Prenatal and postpartum care It is important to take care of yourself and your baby during pregnancy and after delivery. Do not skip your prenatal care appointments or postpartum appointments. If you are concerned about attending your appointment due to COVID-19, talk to your healthcare provider. This section of the book helps you learn to care for yourself during the first month after your pregnancy. It gives you lots of information about the changes happening to your body, warning signs, birth control, nutrition, and excercising.

Caring for yourself as a new mother is just as important as caring for your new baby. The nine months of pregnancy passed, and your bundle of joy is earthside. You may be focused on the baby, but don’t forget to take care of yourself too. The first few weeks of your baby’s life are hard, even for second mothers.

Learning how to take care of a new baby is daunting and frightening. We want to do everything perfectly.

List of related literature:

After the birth, you’ll thank yourself many times over if you take the time now to gather the contact information of people who can help with postpartum care.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Nursing mothers need to take good care of themselves: unplug the phone, nap when the baby naps, let the housework go, forget about outside worries and obligations, keep visitors down to one or two comfortable friends, and eat and drinkwisely.

“Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care: 9th Edition” by Benjamin Spock, Robert Needlman
from Dr. Spock’s Baby and Child Care: 9th Edition
by Benjamin Spock, Robert Needlman
Pocket Books, 2011

Every mum (even those seasoned pros you doubtless eye with envy) feels in over her head in those early weeks, especially when postpartum exhaustion – teamed with nightly sleep deprivation and the recovery from childbirth – is taking its toll on her, body and soul.

“What to Expect When You're Expecting 4th Edition” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What to Expect When You’re Expecting 4th Edition
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

During taking-in, new mothers are passive and dependent, requiring rest and supportive nursing care to promote bonding and attachment.

“A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing” by Annamma Jacob
from A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing
by Annamma Jacob
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2018

Any postpartum help should focus on taking care of just about everything else so all you have to do is take care of the baby—and yourself.

“Natural Health After Birth: The Complete Guide to Postpartum Wellness” by Aviva Jill Romm
from Natural Health After Birth: The Complete Guide to Postpartum Wellness
by Aviva Jill Romm
Inner Traditions/Bear, 2002

Letting go: Day 11 through 6 weeks postpartum as evidenced by preparing to return to work, allowing others to care for infant 2.

“Lippincott's Content Review for NCLEX-RN” by Diane M. Billings
from Lippincott’s Content Review for NCLEX-RN
by Diane M. Billings
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

In a healthy early attachment relationship, when an infant expresses distress, the caregiver typically responds in a manner that ultimately meets the child’s need (for food, a clean diaper, warmth, or contact), soothing the child and helping her to return to a calm, regulated state.

“Treating Adult Survivors of Childhood Emotional Abuse and Neglect” by Elizabeth K. Hopper, Frances K. Grossman, Joseph Spinazzola, Bessel A. van der Kolk, Marla Zucker, Christine A. Courtois
from Treating Adult Survivors of Childhood Emotional Abuse and Neglect
by Elizabeth K. Hopper, Frances K. Grossman, et. al.
Guilford Publications, 2018

• Share knowledge about postpartum emotional problems with close family and friends.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

The classic piece of postpartum advice—repeated again and again by doctors, nurse-midwives, health care manuals, and well-meaning relatives—counsels new mothers not to overlook their own needs.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

You can help with the baby’s care by changing nappies, giving baths and giving cuddles.

“Gender Identity and Discourse Analysis” by Lia Litosseliti, Jane Sunderland
from Gender Identity and Discourse Analysis
by Lia Litosseliti, Jane Sunderland
John Benjamins Pub., 2002

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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2 comments

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  • Six months pregnant here in Colorado and I watch all your videos! I not only learn a ton of practical stuff from your content but also just feel like you are part of my birth team with your calming communication and professionalism. Thank you so much for helping me love my birth! Baby girl due in November��

  • Super helpful! Thank you!!!
    I’m not sure if you said this, but parents should definitely include what they want after labor in their birth plans.
    I had all of this info in my head, but forgot what/why I wanted certain things. In the moment, I ended up agreeing to things that I now know weren’t needed at the time, like the eye cream which got all over the place. I really wish I hadn’t agreed to that.