Summary of the Fencing Reflex in Newborns

 

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Overview of the Fencing Reflex in Newborns Test It Out. To test the fencing reflex, place your baby on their back and turn their head to the right. The reflex Other Names for the Fencing Reflex. The fencing reflex is also called Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex; though your Importance of the. The name comes from the similarity to asymmetrical tonic neck reflex (ATNR), also referred to as fencing reflex, which occurs in newborns.

This is when newborn babies position themselves with one. Tonic Neck Reflex. The tonic neck reflex, also known as the fencing posture, is a pretty simple but funny reflex. If your baby turns her head to one side, she will automatically straighten the arm on the same side, bending the opposite arm, as if she were fencing. The asymmetrical tonic neck reflex (ATNR) is a primitive reflex found in newborn humans that normally vanishes around 6 months of age.

It is also known as the “fencing reflex” because of the characteristic position of the infant’s arms and head, which resembles that of a classically trained fencer. When the face is turned to one side, the arm and leg on the side to which the face is turned extend and the arm and leg on the opposite side flex. Overview of the Fencing Reflex in Newborns. Medically reviewed by Sarah Rahal, MD Preserve Your Memories With a Baby Collage. Fact checked by Donna Murray, RN, BSN The Different Types of Newborn Reflexes.

Medically reviewed by Sarah Rahal, MD The Moro Reflex in Psychology. The tonic neck or fencing reflex happens when you place your baby on their back and move their head to one side. The baby will assume the “fencing position,” extending the arm and leg on the side they’re facing. Their other arm and leg will be flexed, with that hand in a fist.

This reflex is present until about 6 months of age. The Sucking Reflex The sucking reflex is one of seven natural reflexes newborns have, including the Moro reflex, the grasping reflex, the rooting reflex, the stepping reflex, and the fencing reflex. 1  These are essential to their first few weeks and months of life. The neuromotor manifestation of the fencing response resembles reflexes initiated by vestibular stimuli.

Vestibular stimuli activate primitive reflexes in human infants, such as the asymmetric tonic neck reflex, Moro reflex, and parachute reflex, which are likely mediated by vestibular nuclei in the brainstem. The Moro reflex, which may be present in varying degrees in different babies, peaks during the first month and then disappears after two months. One of the more interesting automatic responses is the tonic neck reflex, otherwise known as the fencing posture.

TRUNCAL INCURVATION OR GALANT REFLEX This reflex occurs when the side of the infant’s spine is stroked or tapped while the infant lies on the stomach. The infant will twitch their hips toward the touch in a dancing movement.

List of related literature:

The Moro reflex, present at birth and gone in 3–6 months, is one of the primary newborn reflexes.

“Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics E-Book: First South Asia Edition” by Karen Marcdante, Robert M. Kliegman, O P Misra, Shakuntala Prabhu, Surjit Singh
from Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics E-Book: First South Asia Edition
by Karen Marcdante, Robert M. Kliegman, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

The Moro reflex, present at birth and gone in 3 to 6 months, is one of the primary newborn reflexes.

“Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics E-Book” by Karen Marcdante, Robert M. Kliegman
from Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics E-Book
by Karen Marcdante, Robert M. Kliegman
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

• Primitive reflexes that are evident in a normal newborn include protective reflexes such as swallowing, gagging, sneezing, blinking, rooting, Moro, grasp, Babinski, and tonic neck.

“Journey Across the Life Span: Human Development and Health Promotion” by Elaine U Polan, Daphne R Taylor
from Journey Across the Life Span: Human Development and Health Promotion
by Elaine U Polan, Daphne R Taylor
F.A. Davis Company, 2019

The Moro reflex, named after Ernst Moro, often exists at birth, and it endures until the infant is approximately 4 to 6 months old.

“Human Motor Development: A Lifespan Approach” by V. Gregory Payne, Larry D. Isaacs
from Human Motor Development: A Lifespan Approach
by V. Gregory Payne, Larry D. Isaacs
Taylor & Francis, 2017

The Moro reflex, first present in fragmentary form at 24 weeks, is well developed by 28 weeks, although it fatigues easily and lacks a complete adduction phase.

“Swaiman's Pediatric Neurology E-Book: Principles and Practice” by Kenneth F. Swaiman, Stephen Ashwal, Donna M Ferriero, Nina F Schor, Richard S Finkel, Andrea L Gropman, Phillip L Pearl, Michael Shevell
from Swaiman’s Pediatric Neurology E-Book: Principles and Practice
by Kenneth F. Swaiman, Stephen Ashwal, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

The most commonly elicited reflex in newborns is the Moro reflex, but it is useful to check others including grasp, tonic neck and the Galant reflex.

“Talley & O'Connor's Clinical Examination (SA India Edition): A Systematic Guide to Physical Diagnosis” by Nicholas J Talley, Simon O’Connor
from Talley & O’Connor’s Clinical Examination (SA India Edition): A Systematic Guide to Physical Diagnosis
by Nicholas J Talley, Simon O’Connor
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

tonic neck reflex also called the fencing reflex; seen when the infant lies on the back with the head turned to one side, the arm and leg on that side extended, and the opposite arm flexed as if in a fencing position.

“Broadribb's Introductory Pediatric Nursing” by Nancy T. Hatfield
from Broadribb’s Introductory Pediatric Nursing
by Nancy T. Hatfield
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007

The neonatal or primitive reflexes frequently tested during routine examination of the newborn include the Moro reflex, the asymmetric tonic neck reflex, truncal incurvation (Galant reflex), the palmar and plantar grasp reflexes, the Babinski reflex, and the placing and stepping reflexes.

“Avery's Diseases of the Newborn E-Book” by Christine A. Gleason, Sandra E Juul
from Avery’s Diseases of the Newborn E-Book
by Christine A. Gleason, Sandra E Juul
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

The Moro reflex is present at birth and during the following six months.

“Understanding Motor Development: Infants, Children, Adolescents, Adults” by Jacqueline D Goodway, John C Ozmun, David L Gallahue
from Understanding Motor Development: Infants, Children, Adolescents, Adults
by Jacqueline D Goodway, John C Ozmun, David L Gallahue
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Some— like the rooting and sucking reflexes—help the infant obtain nurturance, while the palmar grasp (automatic hand grasp) and the Moro reflex (reaching out of the arms) help the child hold onto the caretaker.

“The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Healing the Social Brain (Third Edition) (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)” by Louis Cozolino
from The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Healing the Social Brain (Third Edition) (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)
by Louis Cozolino
W. W. Norton, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Hello sir!
    Very nice and informative video.
    May I please know which software you use for teaching/preparing these kinds of video?
    I basically want to know the writing part