Summary of the Babinski Reflex

 

Babinski’s Reflex

Video taken from the channel: jschuber


 

Introduction to how reflexes work reflex arc, monosynaptic and polysynaptic reflexes

Video taken from the channel: Armando Hasudungan


 

Assessment Reflex Exam Comparing Babinski Response Present and Absent

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Babinski Reflex | Plantar Reflex Test | Nursing Head to Toe Assessment

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Plantar reflex or Babinski sign

Video taken from the channel: Clinical Examination Videos


 

How to test the Neurological Babinski Reflex for Upper Motor Neurone Lesion

Video taken from the channel: John Gibbons


 

The Babinski Sign or Reflex | Upper Motor Neuron Lesion

Video taken from the channel: Physiotutors


The Babinski reflex is a reflex response in the bottom part of the foot. It occurs as a reaction to stroking the sole of the foot with a blunt object. Some of the possible disorders indicated by a persistent Babinski reflex include: Lou Gehrig’s disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) Meningitis Multiple sclerosis Brain tumor Brain injury Spinal cord injury Spinal cord defect Spinal cord tumor Stroke. The Babinski sign is a cutaneous reflex in which the big toe moves upward on stimulation of the sole of the foot.

However, the issue is more complicated than simply toe movements. The plantar reflex was known to physicians in the mid-nineteenth century in the sense of reflex withdrawal of the entire lower extremity. The Babinski sign is a cutaneous reflex in which the big toe moves upward on stimulation of the sole of the foot.

However, the issue is more complicated than simply toe movements. The plantar reflex was known to physicians in the mid-nineteenth century in the sense of reflex withdrawal of the entire lower extremity. Babinski Reflex Causes As mentioned it is a normal reflex in a child under the age of two but if it is presence past this age some of the neurological or brain disorders that could be causing it may include: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig disease. The Babinski reflex, or plantar reflex, is a foot reflex that happens naturally in babies and young children until they’re about 6 months to 2 years old. This reflex is usually tested by doctors by.

Babinski reflex is one of the normal reflexes in infants. Reflexes are responses that occur when the body receives a certain stimulus. The Babinski reflex occurs after the sole of the foot has been firmly stroked.

The big toe then moves upward or. Babinski reflex is one of the normal reflexes in infants. Reflexes are responses that occur when the body receives a certain stimulus. The Babinski reflex occurs after the sole of the foot has been firmly stroked. The big toe then moves upward or.

a reflex action of the toes, normal during infancy but abnormal after 12 to 18 months of age; after locomotion begins, it is indicative of abnormalities in the motor control pathways leading from the cerebral cortex and is widely used as a diagnostic aid in disorders of the central nervous system. Babinski reflex: A reflex used to determine adequacy of the higher (central) nervous system. The Babinski reflex is obtained by stimulating the outside of the sole of the foot, causing extension of the big toe while fanning the other toes.

The examiner begins the stimulation at the heel and goes forward to the base of the toes.

List of related literature:

Much revered and researched, this reflex was originally described by Babinski in 1896.45,46 It goes by various names, including the Babinski response, sign, or reflex; the upgoing toe; and the extensor response.

“Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis E-Book” by Steven McGee
from Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis E-Book
by Steven McGee
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Presence of the Babinski reflex indicates acute or chronic injury to the UMN from the cortex to the corticospinal tract.

“Pediatric Critical Care Study Guide: Text and Review” by Steven E. Lucking, Frank A. Maffei, Robert F. Tamburro, Neal J. Thomas
from Pediatric Critical Care Study Guide: Text and Review
by Steven E. Lucking, Frank A. Maffei, et. al.
Springer London, 2012

Finally, Hoffmann’s reflex is analogous to Babinski’s reflex.

“Primary Care for the Physical Therapist E-Book: Examination and Triage” by William G. Boissonnault
from Primary Care for the Physical Therapist E-Book: Examination and Triage
by William G. Boissonnault
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

The Babinski reflex is described in Skill 20.1, step 22 of this chapter.

“Concept-Based Clinical Nursing Skills E-Book: Fundamental to Advanced” by Loren Stein, Connie J Hollen
from Concept-Based Clinical Nursing Skills E-Book: Fundamental to Advanced
by Loren Stein, Connie J Hollen
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Babinski’s reflex [Extensor plantar reflex] Babinski’s reflex—dorsiflexion of the great toe with extension and fanning of the other toes—is an abnormal reflex elicited by firmly stroking the lateral aspect of the sole of the foot with a blunt object.

“Professional Guide to Signs and Symptoms” by Lippincott
from Professional Guide to Signs and Symptoms
by Lippincott
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2012

Testing for the Babinski reflex (named after the French neurologist Josef Babinski) is also important because this abnormal sign in anyone more than one year old is always an indication of damage in the central nervous system.

“Multiple Sclerosis For Dummies” by Rosalind Kalb, Nancy Holland, Barbara Giesser, David L. Lander
from Multiple Sclerosis For Dummies
by Rosalind Kalb, Nancy Holland, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

• Babinski reflex is a superficial reflex with afferents from the outer margin of foot and the sole, including the ball of great

“Elsevier Comprehensive Guide PGMEE With Companion Website Volume 3” by Exam
from Elsevier Comprehensive Guide PGMEE With Companion Website Volume 3
by Exam
Elsevier (A Divisionof Reed Elsevier India Pvt. Limited), 2009

The most important of the pathological reflexes is the Babinski response, which is a superficial reflex that is elicited in the same manner as the plantar response (Table 3-10).

“Orthopaedics for the Physical Therapist Assistant” by Mark Dutton
from Orthopaedics for the Physical Therapist Assistant
by Mark Dutton
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2011

Upward movement of the great toe and fanning of the little toes—called Babinski’s reflex—is abnormal.

“Emergency Nursing Made Incredibly Easy!” by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
from Emergency Nursing Made Incredibly Easy!
by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007

The Babinski reflex (see Interlude 2) is also seen in adult patients with damaged corticospinal tracts and reflects the absence of myelin from the same tracts in neonates (Brain and Wilkinson 1959).

“The Evolution of Childhood: Relationships, Emotion, Mind” by Melvin Konner, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Program in Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology Melvin Konner, M.D.
from The Evolution of Childhood: Relationships, Emotion, Mind
by Melvin Konner, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Program in Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology Melvin Konner, M.D.
Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2010

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26 comments

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  • Around 13:30 I still don’t understand why the toes extend upwards Yes, I get that due to pyramidal lesion / underdeveloped pyramidal system there will be no inhibitory message from the upper motor neuron, however, in the video it doesn’t mention any excitatory message that is being transmitted to the extensor muscles of the feet / toes, so, why do they curl up? on top of that, we still have an excitatory message to the flexor muscles of the feet, so I don’t understand how the babinski sign happens. I guess the actual response is much more complicated than the one given in the video? Anyway, great video regardless.

  • Congratulations on de work gás helped us a lot. I would like to make a request please if possible release legend in Portuguese Brazil would help us further, we foreign registrants. Big hug success.

  • The subtitle said that the fan sign in French is “Signe de Levante” while i was googling i’m unable to find the related result about the Babinski’s sign, then i realise that the real spelling is “signe de l’éventail” and the google result refer to the Babinski’s sign. Hope this information help!

  • You clearly said it only lasts until about 24 months…then why are you demonstrating it on an adult? Or is she initiating it consciously just for demo?

  • MOVEMENT of the big toe UPWARDS and/or FANNING OUT of the other toes = BABINSKI PRESENT = ABNORMAL (in an older child or adult) & NORMAL (in a baby)
    NO MOVEMENT of the toes or GRASPING (pulling down & inwards due to ticklishness) = BABINKSI ABSENT = NORMAL (in an older child or adult) & ABNORMAL (in a baby)
    There’s no positive or negative. Babinski is either present or absent. You’re looking for movement of the toes in response to stroking of the underside of the foot in any path from heel towards toe region, and even across the foot in the arch region (being mindful of what’s normal for the age of the patient). Babinski reflex is usually no longer present sometime between first and second year.
    Here’s another video on the subject https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOq5Np0eZ6A

  • thanks..a…lot…sir…there..is..a..gorgeous..combo..of..art..&..teaching..
    heartly..thank…you..for..your..lactures..☺️������������

  • The brain cells are just as reflexive to external stimuli as the parts of the body you’ve pointed out in this video. It is a chain reaction that has started before our birth and started with the very first organism.

  • Great Explanation Dear Sir…��������❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤
    Thanku So Much Sir….����������������������������������������������������������������
    You are very Great….❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

  • Think about this: If you were to remove your ability to hear, then your sight, and then your ability to feel and then smell, what would your conscious experience be? Now imagine you were born that way (without any senses)… So now you have no senses and no idea of anything= no referential experience what so ever. What would that experience be? Our experience is dependent on our senses, and our faculties for sensing is all automatic= Reflexive. Reflexes are all electrical. Now extend this fact to every cell in your body: Billions of cells simultaneously reflex to give rise to the sensation of self and “consciousness”.

  • At 7:22 the narrator says that “all synaptic reflexes involve interneurons”. This is almost always the case, but not in the case of the stretch reflex which is a monosynaptic sensory -> motor synapse.

  • Thank you very much to you and your patient for creating this example to compare Babinski vs no Babinski response! Much appreciated!

  • Plz get your flexion extension basics corrected. The upgoing tow is doing extension and downward movement of the toes is the flexion.

  • Ah, that’s what my neurologist did to me the other day.
    My feet curled down and I pulled away. It didn’t really hurt, just felt ticklish and uncomfortable. 

  • Just a correction to make about the video regarding the terminology:

    Positive Babinski (indicating Upper Motor Nerve lesion) = big toe Extension (toe going upwards) + smaller toes fanning

    Negative Babinski (normal or Lower Motor Nerve lesion) = all toes Flexing (going downwards)

    Please see image here: http://puu.sh/5J8iN.jpg

  • Hi, thanks for your video sir. May i ask if i conclude that usually the stimulus will be sensed by intrafusal muscle fibers and then the motor neuron of extrafusal fiber (the alpha neuron) will carry on the signal and stimulate the contraction of muscle? If yes may i ask why does intrafusal muscle has motor neuron supplying it as well?

  • Hv I ever told u… U r most amazing tutor on earth….! Ur lects provide me with knowledge & ur drawings render me speechless at same time!

  • In patella reflex why we called it monocynapse if it has an afferent that synapse with other inhibitory interneuron? Why isn’t polysynapse?

  • I’m learning a lot through your videos especially now during quarantine and our professors will be giving us exams despite not sending any lectures. Massive thanks for all your videos. It’s a great help to a lot of struggling med students like me.

  • According to Macleod’s Clinical Examinations 14th ed, to elicit the Babinski sign you go laterally from heel to little toe, NOT to the great toe as shown in the video.

  • Thanks doctor
    Please I want some advices in order to tell me how I can succeed my neurology exam ����
    and how can I revise well
    thank u… ^^

  • Thanks brother ��
    Jazakkallahu hairan
    From India ����Hindusthan
    I’m MohamedNowful
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  • Please help me kindly. I suffered a stroke and I have the same problems with the foot.. Is there any help knowing? I am a physiotherapist from Germany

  • Thank you for your informative video
    I was in semiology class… our professor tested my plantar reflex accidently to show other students this reflex and I was babinski positive… Should I be worried and go to doctor?
    Thank you in advance��

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  • one evening i lost feeling over my left foot, the next day i couldn’t feel from the foot up till the knee ( can still walk and run around), went to the doctor and he did this test and he noticed something was wrong. now i just did a CAT-scan and waiting for answers:(

  • @AAABeatbox Yes, but it can be present with a neurological pathology. In other words, this sign only appears in newborns, children under 4 years and adults with neurological disease. In healthy adults it does not appear. That’s why it’s used as a neurological diagnostic test to discard a neurological disease in an adult patient.