Strategies for Moving Your Child From Crib to sleep

 

TRANSITIONING TO A TODDLER BED TIPS

Video taken from the channel: Emily Norris


 

Parenting Tips How to Transition Your Toddler From Crib To Bed

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When to Move Your Toddler to a Big Kid Bed

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4 tips to transition your toddler from crib to bed

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Transitioning My Toddler to a Bed: My Experience & Tips! | Susan Yara

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TODDLER SLEEP TRAINING TIPS!! | How to transition from Crib to Toddler Bed

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How to transition your toddler from crib to bed

Video taken from the channel: Cityline


If your toddler seems keen on the idea of transitioning from crib to bed, by all means, jump right in. Place the bed where the crib used to be and see how it goes. If, however, your toddler seems worried, unsure or balks at the very mention of the big bed, then give it a try at naptime first. Since toddler beds only accommodate crib mattresses, though, you may want to avoid investing in one and move your child directly to a twin bed.

One way to make this transition less dramatic is to put the mattress directly on the floor for a while. This routine—which can involve reading a story, talking about your child’s day, or praying—should leave your child looking forward to going to bed. A consistent bedtime ritual should also help. Toddlers at this age are routine oriented, so when you’re transitioning from a crib, leave everything else the same.

Keeping the bed in the same spot as the crib, leaving the rest of the room the same, and always ensuring the presence of stuffed animals will help ease your toddler into the transition. 2. Take it a Step at a Time. When to Transition to a Toddler Bed Over 90% of 18-month-olds sleep in a crib, but that gradually drops to about 80% at 2 years and 40% by 3 years of age. After the first birthday, it’s wise to put the mattress all the way down and make sure your tot doesn’t have toys or bumpers to climb on. To ease the transition, put your toddler’s new bed in the same place his crib used to be.

If you’re using a twin bed, you may not want to make an immediate switch to grown-up sheets and blankets that are tucked in. Your child may find it soothing to continue to sleep with his old crib blanket, even if it’s too small. A toddler bed usually uses the same size mattress as a crib and is low to the ground. This means you can use your crib mattress longer — though some parents do opt to get a whole new bed for. Climbing out of the crib is not necessarily a reason to transition to a bed.

You may have a ninja on your hands, as many 2-year-olds are, but don’t let her ability to scale the crib spur you to rush the transition. Try these tips first: Put on a sleep sack to make it more difficult to scale the crib. If he is content in his crib, his size isn’t an issue, and you don’t need the crib for a new baby, let him stay in the crib until the move becomes a necessity. Once you’ve moved the child to a bigger bed, take down the crib right away. Your child is less likely to ask to sleep there if.

How to Transition From Co-Sleeping to a Toddler Bed Talk to your child about what it means to have their own room and own bed. Sit with your child at first as they fall asleep, and then slowly move closer to the door with each phase. Only move on to a new phase once a child has acclimated to the current one.

List of related literature:

Many families put their babies in a crib, bassinet, or cosleeper at the beginning of the night, and then move them into their bed as morning approaches to get a few more hours of sleep.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Walk her slowly toward the crib or bed, rocking continuously.

“Be Prepared: A Practical Handbook for New Dads” by Gary Greenberg, Jeannie Hayden
from Be Prepared: A Practical Handbook for New Dads
by Gary Greenberg, Jeannie Hayden
Simon & Schuster, 2008

Try a smaller bed, such as a bassinet, portable crib, buggy, or cradle, or use a rolled-up blanket to turn a corner of the big crib into a smaller place.

“Foundations of Nursing E-Book” by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
from Foundations of Nursing E-Book
by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Make sure he has something to catch his eye on both sides of the crib,or install something interesting that can be moved

“Your Baby's First Year For Dummies” by James Gaylord, Michelle Hagen
from Your Baby’s First Year For Dummies
by James Gaylord, Michelle Hagen
Wiley, 2011

• Always lay the baby flat in bed (in the bassinet or crib) on his or her back for sleep, for naps, and at night.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

To stop your toddler falling out of bed you can put a rolled-up towel along the edge of her bed under the sheet.

“Baby to Toddler Month by Month” by Simone Cave, Caroline Fertleman
from Baby to Toddler Month by Month
by Simone Cave, Caroline Fertleman
Hay House, 2011

Traditional bassinets or small playpens or baby beds also work well, if you’re not comfortable sharing the bed with the baby.

“Dad's Guide to Pregnancy For Dummies” by Matthew M. F. Miller, Sharon Perkins
from Dad’s Guide to Pregnancy For Dummies
by Matthew M. F. Miller, Sharon Perkins
Wiley, 2010

Tie or anchor the cradle to the bed as necessary.

“Diversified Health Occupations” by Louise Simmers
from Diversified Health Occupations
by Louise Simmers
Delmar Publishers, 2001

If your child is in a bed rather than a crib, put guardrails on all sides so he won’t fall out of bed.

“A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Sleep: Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Problems” by Jodi A. Mindell, Judith A. Owens
from A Clinical Guide to Pediatric Sleep: Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Problems
by Jodi A. Mindell, Judith A. Owens
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

The mattress should be firm and fit snugly in the crib.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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8 comments

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  • Yes me and my husband’s did the same thing but we transitioned are daughter to a toddler bed when she was 1 year old and she loves it she feels so independent and she can get on and off her bed by herself

  • What I always wondered is why people don’t put babies from the get go into a toddler bed? If it has railing on both sides (with the correct spacing of rails) the baby won’t fall out. Once the child gets older and manages to climb out one can use the same system you use with toddlers add a baby gate outside their room. If one is concerned about the child being uncomfortable in such a big bed (which can also occur in a crib) swaddle him the first few months
    However I’m finding it impossible to find anything on the internet that talks about this. It’s either a crib or co-sleeping, nothing in-between. Seems pretty ridiculous since I’m sure there must be families out there that can’t afford a crib.
    Why must one use a crib other than the fact that everyone else seems to be doing it??

  • Great tips! Can’t believe no one left any comment yet, really appreciate this! We are thinking of moving our 2.5 yo boy out of his crib cuz baby #2 is on the way and I certainly don’t wish to go thru the process when i’’m 8 months pregnant…

  • My daughter bangs in her cot she rolls a lot and hits the sides and I’m wanting to put her in a big bed like a queen bed with bed sides. Would that be a sign to transition her? She’s not a climber so that doesn’t work for us and also when I tell her it’s nap time she goes to either my bed and hops in herself or goes to the single bed in her room and grabs a pillow

  • My toddler is non-verbal with adhd (not diagnosed and I don’t plan to medicate him even if he is unless I can find a natural non addictive medication. Just seems that way). He climbed onto the changing table part of his crib and finally one day climbed out the side of the crib and fell. Luckily didn’t fall from the changing table. But I had to get the toddler bed asap. This is his first night.. And he’s still awake and it’s midnight he doesn’t understand much since he’s non verbal/has bad communication. So I’m stuck. There’s a baby gate in front of his door and one at the stairs. But he can rip the one in front of his door down. And he also keeps knocking at his door, opening it and slamming it shut (And no I can’t do anything for that I’m in an apartment complex) (he’s 2)

  • What if your son tries to climb into the crib when he’s ready for bed? Is that a good sign? He’s only a year and half, but we need the crib for a new little one…

  • Love the idea!! My granddaughter cried every night for a year she is now 28 months old, still hasn’t climb out of the bed. We changed her bed time story from our living room into her room with pillows and fun blankets. I still want to tranform the crib to half crib. My fear is that she won’t stay in bed. Perhaps stay in her room until she falls asleep?? I don’t know why she cries every night. I did everything I can do to make her comfortable.

  • Tonight my 19month old daughter will be sleeping In a big girl bed for the first time.���� oh I hope it’s a smooth night! Thank you for the tips