Strategies for Breastfeeding a Sleeping Baby

 

BABYWISE: HOW TO KEEP BABY AWAKE FOR A FULL FEEDING

Video taken from the channel: Infinite Mamabilities


 

Keeping a Tired Baby Awake for Feeding | Breastfeeding

Video taken from the channel: Howcast


 

Episode 089 Sleep Training and Breastfeeding

Video taken from the channel: Sleep Sense


 

The Problem With Nursing Your Baby to Sleep

Video taken from the channel: Sleep Sense


 

How to Breastfeed: Keeping Sleepy Babies Awake for Breastfeeding

Video taken from the channel: eHow


 

Sleepy and reluctant babies

Video taken from the channel: Scottish Government


 

Baby Sleeping While Breastfeeding-How to Keep Him Awake

Video taken from the channel: FirstCry Parenting


How to Wake Your Baby. Touch your baby: Ease your child out of their sleepy state by tickling their feet or gently rubbing their arms, legs, and back. Talk to your child: Just hearing your voice might be enough to wake your baby. Unwrap your baby: Remove your child’s blankets and even undress. 8 Tips for Breastfeeding a Sleepy Baby.

How often to wake up your baby for breastfeeding. Babies are sleepy people in general. However, the one breastfeeding fact you should know is Talking to the baby. Change of diaper.

Gently take off the blanket. Burping your baby. 27 Ways To Keep Your Sleeping Baby Awake During Breastfeeding (Try 1 or 2 each feeding session to see what works best to rouse your baby) Light up the room. Take off their clothes and socks. Gently massage your baby’s reflex points for instant stimulation.

For instance, you may rub gentle circles around his or her palms for up to a minute at a time. The crown of the head is another reflex point to try. Try to stick to a predictable feeding and sleeping schedule. Use a breastfeeding positionthat is less “sleep-inducing,” like letting your baby lie in the football hold position or straddling position.

Try tickling your baby under the arms, on the feet or in the neck. touching your baby gently on the arms, legs or ears can wake him/her again. Breastfed babies There’s no rest for the weary. According to La Leche League International, you should begin nursing your baby within 1 hour. A sling can help, there is no reason why you have to sit quietly in a dark room while you are breastfeeding your baby to sleep. You can breastfeed in a ring sling or wrap while moving around the house or with a hand free for a remote control or phone.

Foremilk and Hindmilk Some experts worry that feeding a baby for 5 to 10 minutes alternating between each breast will fill the baby with the more watery foremilk and lead to more night waking. They think that the baby must get the rich hindmilk to make him sleepy (like a. For the first two or three weeks of life, your baby may not automatically wake up when he or she needs to eat. Newborns need to eat every two hours throughout the day and at least every four or five hours during the night. If your baby wants to sleep for longer periods.

The most important issues to remember when sleeping with your breastfed baby are: Never sleep with your baby on a sofa or armchair/recliner. Never sleep with your baby after drinking alcohol.

List of related literature:

Often, your baby will fall asleep at the end of the first breast and either awaken to nurse from the second (after a good burp, see here) or sleep through until the next feeding.

“What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Over time, you gradually shorten the baby’s time at the breast, with the aim of ending the nursing as soon as she stops actively sucking, before she is fully asleep (you must stay awake yourself, of course, to manage this).

“The Nursing Mother's Companion” by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
from The Nursing Mother’s Companion
by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
Harvard Common Press, 2005

Try reclining in bed, supporting your back with a heap of pillows, and placing baby between your breasts, covered with a light blanket to keep her back warm.

“The Mama Natural Week-by-Week Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth” by Genevieve Howland
from The Mama Natural Week-by-Week Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth
by Genevieve Howland
Gallery Books, 2017

and when she has breast-fed, she should put [the baby] to sleep, but when he has rested a bit, and when the milk has been swallowed, she should move the cradle gently, and she should sing soft and lovely songs to put the baby to sleep.

“Medieval Medicine: A Reader” by Faith Wallis
from Medieval Medicine: A Reader
by Faith Wallis
University of Toronto Press, 2010

Hand expressing milk at the beginning of the feed may assist in getting the newborn interested in feeding by getting a taste of the milk, and using breast compressions (gently squeezing the breast with a hand to increase the flow of milk when milk flow is slow) may help the newborn stay awake at the breast.

“Leifer's Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book” by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
from Leifer’s Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book
by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

When breastfeeding is unrestricted, some babies breastfeed for several hours at a stretch, switching back and forth many times from breast to breast, then sleeping for several hours, and repeating this pattern until the milk increases on day three or four.

“Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers” by Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman
from Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers
by Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman
New Harbinger Publications, 2010

Some guidelines recommend that a mother stay awake during feeds and return her baby to a crib for sleep; however, the hormones of breastfeeding induce relaxation and drowsiness in mother and baby, which is a major advantage of breastfeeding (Levine et al., 2007).

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Breastfeeding may improve nocturnal sleep and reduce infantile colic: Potential role of breast milk melatonin.

“Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician” by Marsha Walker
from Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician
by Marsha Walker
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Vigorous sucking occurs for 5 minutes spent at each breast before falling asleep The nurse assures a breastfeeding mother that one way she will know that her infant is getting an adequate supply of breast milk is if the infant gains weight.

“Mosby's Review Questions for the NCLEX-RN Exam E-Book” by Patricia M. Nugent, Judith S. Green, Barbara A. Vitale, Phyllis K. Pelikan
from Mosby’s Review Questions for the NCLEX-RN Exam E-Book
by Patricia M. Nugent, Judith S. Green, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

The second breast should be offered, but in the early days, the baby may fall asleep after one breast and feed at more frequent intervals.

“Primary Care E-Book: A Collaborative Practice” by Terry Mahan Buttaro, Patricia Polgar-Bailey, Joanne Sandberg-Cook, JoAnn Trybulski
from Primary Care E-Book: A Collaborative Practice
by Terry Mahan Buttaro, Patricia Polgar-Bailey, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

5 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Thank you so much for the advice. Yes, you are right, we as humans, whether we’re grown ups or babies are very protective about our bedtime rituals. We as parents are the ones who train our children on those bedtime rituals, and sometimes bad habits, I take ownership of my part too. Breaking bad habits that we reinforced is not easy, but not impossible, it just takes a firm determination that our choice is the best for our children and stick to it even when it gets hard.

  • Where could I get a pillow like yours? I have trouble keeping my baby up as you have shown… And I had a c-section so it’s tough, thanks so much!!

  • @soldierwife1234: I think that is generally true that the baby will cry for milk when they are at least 2 wks old, for newborns you would need to ensure they are not dehydrated if they have gone without milk for 4 hours. And they may not cry in hunger because they may have felt weak, or not known what was hunger.

  • What kind of chair is that? I have a bad hip so the weight of the baby whole nursing is hard on me. I lie down but sometimes I’d like to sit up.

    What kind of chair is that?

  • I used to have this same problem!! Lol.. I used to get a baby wipe and wipe it on his face and blow on it softly to keep him awake.. Worked for me =D