Sleep Issues and Solutions for Twin Toddlers

 

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Use these tips for ensuring smoother slumber: Establish routines. Creating consistency will help signal your children that bedtime is approaching. Follow the same pattern from night to night — bath, brushing teeth, storytime, and lights out. 2  Aim to start the bedtime routine about the same time each evening.

Some parents may enjoy sleeping with their children, but this can be a toddler sleep problem in other families. Sharing a room or sharing a bed may be primarily a cultural or economic issue. Have quiet play before this.

Aim to settle the twins in bed by 9.15 so they are asleep by 9.30. Then, after a week, move the whole process earlier by 15 minutes. Repeat this until the twins are going to bed by 7.30 to 8pm, and keep daytime naps at 45 minutes. In Sleep Solutions: Quiet Nights for You and Your Child from Birth to Five Years, author Rachel Waddilove recommends that parents begin with 5-minute increments and then extend the time to 7.

Bear in mind that you need to allow for 10 to 12 hours sleep, so, if they love waking up at 5 am each morning no matter what, you may need to adjust bedtime accordingly. Also, consider sunset. If you’re further North, the sun will set earlier and will trigger your child’s circadian rhythm, making him sleepy.

Stick to the same set bed times and wake up times each day. Don’t short change nap time either – make sure that it does not occur too late in the day or that it is too brief – either of these will result in lack of a good night’s sleep. Maintain a consistent bedtime routine.

We go over some of the problems parents are facing and some common and highly researched solutions. But before we dive in, it might be comforting to know you are not alone in your endeavors. 50 percent of children have problems sleeping at some time during their childhood, says Zheng (Jane) Fan, MD, of the UNC Department of Neurology.

The solution: Make bedtime a priority. A predictable, calming bedtime routine is key to a good night’s sleep. Avoid active play and electronic devices, which are stimulating. You might give your child a bath and read stories. Talk about the day.

Play soothing bedtime music. Then tuck your child into bed drowsy but awake and say good night. Make sure the noise level in the house is low. Avoid giving children large meals close to bedtime.

Make after-dinner playtime a relaxing time as too much activity close to bedtime can keep. Sleep Solutions Check out these eight parent-tested sleep solutions for toddlers, and soon everyone in your house will have a restful night of sleep. On average, preschoolers need between 11 and 13 hours of sleep each night to keep them happy and healthy.

List of related literature:

Talk with your treatment providers about the importance of naps and see if they can schedule their appointments with your twin around his naps.

“The Sleep Lady's Good Night, Sleep Tight: Gentle Proven Solutions to Help Your Child Sleep Without Leaving Them to Cry it Out” by Kim West, Joanne Kenen
from The Sleep Lady’s Good Night, Sleep Tight: Gentle Proven Solutions to Help Your Child Sleep Without Leaving Them to Cry it Out
by Kim West, Joanne Kenen
Hachette Books, 2020

In a child more than 5 months of age, behavioural treatment works well for sleep association disorder.

“Oxford Textbook of Primary Medical Care” by Roger Jones (Prof.)
from Oxford Textbook of Primary Medical Care
by Roger Jones (Prof.)
Oxford University Press, 2005

The sleep experts are all in accord that children need a quiet, darkened, calm environment in which to become effective sleepers.

“Toxic Childhood: How The Modern World Is Damaging Our Children And What We Can Do About It” by Sue Palmer
from Toxic Childhood: How The Modern World Is Damaging Our Children And What We Can Do About It
by Sue Palmer
Orion Publishing Group, 2015

yourchild nap inhis own room, or start the night inhis own room, and then foraweek, transfer him to yourbed ifhe wakes up.This isa better idea than letting your child fall asleepin your bed and then transferring himwhile asleep (don’tbait and switch—your child should go to bed as a conscious participant).

“The Happy Sleeper: The Science-Backed Guide to Helping Your Baby Get a Good Night's Sleep-Newborn to School Age” by Heather Turgeon MFT, Julie Wright MFT, Daniel J. Siegel MD
from The Happy Sleeper: The Science-Backed Guide to Helping Your Baby Get a Good Night’s Sleep-Newborn to School Age
by Heather Turgeon MFT, Julie Wright MFT, Daniel J. Siegel MD
Penguin Publishing Group, 2014

Most parents will have tried a wide variety of solutions to their children’s sleep problems before consulting a clinical psychologist.

“The Handbook of Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychology: A Contextual Approach” by Alan Carr
from The Handbook of Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychology: A Contextual Approach
by Alan Carr
Routledge, 1999

• Try to make sure that the people around you understand why you are prioritising your child’s sleep health and get them involved in the bedtime and nap routines so that they

“The Baby Sleep Solution: The stay and support method to help your baby sleep through the night” by Lucy Wolfe
from The Baby Sleep Solution: The stay and support method to help your baby sleep through the night
by Lucy Wolfe
Gill Books, 2017

I recently asked a group of pediatric colleagues what they said when they gave young parents sleep-training advice, and each one of them had slightly different recommendations.

“7 Secrets of the Newborn: Secrets and (Happy) Surprises of the First Year” by Robert C. Hamilton M.D., Sally Collings
from 7 Secrets of the Newborn: Secrets and (Happy) Surprises of the First Year
by Robert C. Hamilton M.D., Sally Collings
St. Martin’s Publishing Group, 2018

Patience and soothing reassurance at the time of the sleep disruption are usually the only treatment recommended for both children and adults.

“Psychology in Action” by Karen Huffman, Katherine Dowdell, Catherine A. Sanderson
from Psychology in Action
by Karen Huffman, Katherine Dowdell, Catherine A. Sanderson
Wiley, 2017

Sleep Assessment by Age • Sleep patterns should be assessed at every well-child visit and as needed when a child is seen for an illness or other complaint.

“Advanced Pediatric Assessment, Third Edition” by Ellen M. Chiocca, PhD, CPNP, RNC-NIC
from Advanced Pediatric Assessment, Third Edition
by Ellen M. Chiocca, PhD, CPNP, RNC-NIC
Springer Publishing Company, 2019

• Provide a firm sleep surface and avoid soft bedding, excess covers, pillows, and stuffed animals in the crib.

“Maternity and Pediatric Nursing” by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
from Maternity and Pediatric Nursing
by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • My toddler is 2.5 yr old she naps 3-4 hrs a day. Which disturb her night sleep routine. She stays awake till late night. I am having difficulty to set her sleep schedule