Situations When You Pump and Dump During Breastfeeding

 

Maryland Hospital Breastfeeding Training Module: Session 10

Video taken from the channel: Maryland WIC


 

When You Need to Use a Breast Pump

Video taken from the channel: Breastfeeding Confidential


 

Pregnancy/Breastfeeding and Multiple Sclerosis

Video taken from the channel: Dr. Brandon Beaber


 

Verify: Does pumping and dumping breast milk get rid of alcohol?

Video taken from the channel: 12 News


If your breasts become full and uncomfortable, you can pump and dump your breast milk. But, it’s important to note that pumping and dumping will not help you to remove the alcohol from your body more quickly. Recreational Drugs: No amount of recreational drug use is safe or recommended during pregnancy, breastfeeding or parenting for that matter.

Luckily, dumping out pumped milk is an option you may not often need, since occasional, moderate use of alcohol and caffeine shouldn’t require you to pump and dump. If you’re taking prescription. If you need to wait 24 or 48 hours after the procedure to breastfeed, then make plans ahead of time to ensure your baby has milk in storage for that period of time. You will need to pump and dump at your baby’s regularly scheduled feeding times to ensure your milk is safe and your milk supply isn’t impacted. When the breastfeeding “pump and dump” is put in the context of these other meanings, we see that all of them imply judgment.

In the stock market, he who pumps and dumps is defrauding innocent investors for his own gain. In dating and relationships, he who pumps and dumps is committing a similar type of fraud, albeit for a shorter-term gain. The more you pump, the more milk you’ll produce. If you’re working full time, try to pump for 15 minutes every few hours during the workday. If you can, pump both breasts simultaneously.

A double breast pump helps stimulate milk production while reducing pumping time by half. Gently pressing on your breasts while pumping may help empty them. If it is a short-term medication, pumping and dumping will keep your milk supply up until you can resume nursing.

If you are on incompatible medications for the long term, discuss options with your provider. While you may need to wean, donor breast milk is an option for your baby or you may choose to use formula. 1. Pump after breastfeeding.

Experts agree that you should put your baby’s breastfeeding needs first and pump after breastfeeding. Roberts recommends delaying pumping until about two weeks after birth, or when your milk supply is established. “Once you are ready to start pumping, nurse your baby, then pump afterward,” she says. In the past it was recommended that women discard breastmilk (“pump and dump”) immediately after surgery before resuming breastfeeding.

This outdated recommendation was made before data was available on the accumulation of drugs in breastmilk yet is still widely circulated on the internet, creating considerable confusion among patients. If you can’t breastfeed while taking the antibiotic, make sure to pump and dump your milk on a regular schedule to maintain your milk supply. Excessive alcohol consumption while breastfeeding could also affect the infant’s sleep patterns and early development. If a mother decides to express or pump milk within two hours (per drink) of consuming alcohol, the mother may choose to discard the expressed milk.

If a mother has consumed more than a moderate amount of alcohol, she may.

List of related literature:

After this time (or during the first 2 weeks if the mother has a large supply or if the infant is not effectively stimulating the supply), mothers can pump milk after each feeding such that the breasts calibrate to a 50% oversupply of milk to be stored in the freezer.

“Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician” by Marsha Walker
from Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician
by Marsha Walker
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Other mothers view pumping as part of a grief-like reaction that is reinforced every 2 to 3 hours when they must use a pump in the absence of a baby at breast.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

See Chapter 22 for a discussion on pumping for a hospitalized baby.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

For women who undergo postpartum tubal ligation, breastfeeding interruption is not indicated, as the volume of colostrum is small.34 In addition, the levels of medication in the maternal plasma and milk are low once mothers resume normal mentation.

“Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession” by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
from Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession
by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

When you pump, you can leave home for longer stretches of time, without the anxiety of having to rush back for feeds.

“Getting to 50/50: How Working Parents Can Have It All” by Sharon Meers, Joanna Strober
from Getting to 50/50: How Working Parents Can Have It All
by Sharon Meers, Joanna Strober
Viva Editions, 2013

pumping (I was done after having a more intimate relationship with my pump than I did with my husband — I literally saw that horrible pump more than I saw anyone else), less worrying about things like whether you’re getting enough food or sleep.

“Rants in the Dark: From One Tired Mama to Another” by Emily Writes
from Rants in the Dark: From One Tired Mama to Another
by Emily Writes
Penguin Random House New Zealand, 2017

Breastfeeding or pumping every 112 to 2 hours makes the mother more comfortable and prevents stasis.

“Foundations and Adult Health Nursing” by Kim Cooper, RN, MSN, Kelly Gosnell, RN, MSN
from Foundations and Adult Health Nursing
by Kim Cooper, RN, MSN, Kelly Gosnell, RN, MSN
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Reasons for discontinuing pumping or breastfeeding included the mothers’ own physical and emotional problems, infant health concerns, and lack of time and support.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

■ Pumping can interfere with personal time or time to spend with the infant.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

At this point you too may notice a drop in the amount you can pump, but this doesn’t necessarily mean you can’t meet your baby’s needs.

“The Nursing Mother's Companion” by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
from The Nursing Mother’s Companion
by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
Harvard Common Press, 2005

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I m 6 months postpartum still breastfeeding..never took a dmd. Don’t plan on taking one…vitamin d, swank, dairy free, gluten free, rest, destress, etc. I do feel concerned when I stop breastfeeding with hormone changes. Also, a major concern for a pregnant, breastfeeding mom with Ms is sleep deprivation. Not much in this talk to benefit someone like me. Really nothing.