School-Aged Kids and Exercise

 

11 Fun physical education games | pe games | primary school aktivities | eğitsel oyunlar

Video taken from the channel: EDUCATION GAMES


 

How to get kids moving: expand, extend, and enhance physical activity opportunities

Video taken from the channel: BMC


 

Physical Activities and Games for Children

Video taken from the channel: Parks and Recreation Ontario


 

Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC)

Video taken from the channel: WHO Regional Office for Europe


 

HappyFeet Saskatchewan Class Ages 2-3

Video taken from the channel: Chris Zoller


 

Types of physical activities for healthy children between 5 and 12 years old

Video taken from the channel: Aspetar سبيتار


 

Physical Activity in Elementary or school age children

Video taken from the channel: Hannah Gaddam


Preschool-aged children (ages 3 through 5 years) should be physically active throughout the day for growth and Adult caregivers should encourage preschool-aged children to be active when they play. Less than one-quarter (24%) of children 6 to 17 years of age participate in 60 minutes of physical activity every day. 8; In 2017, only 26.1% of high school students participate in at least 60 minutes per day of physical activity on all 7 days of the previous week. 9 In 2017, 51.1% of high school students participated in muscle strengthening exercises (e.g., push-ups, sit-ups, weight lifting. At least 60 minutes of physical activity; No more than 2 hours of screen time; 9–12 hours per day of sleep for individuals aged 6–12 years; 8–10 hours for those aged 13–17 years; Only 8.8% of children in the US meet all three guidelines.

While 86% of kids are getting enough sleep, a mere 23% get enough physical activity. For example, it can help your child to: develop physical fitness, self-esteem and confidence improve movement and coordination skills learn to listen and follow instructions and basic tactics learn to lead, follow and be part of a team learn about fair playand being a good sport. School-related physical activity interventions may reduce anxiety, increase resilience, improve well-being and increase positive mental health in children and adolescents. Considering the positive effects of physical activity on health in general, these findings may reinforce school-based initiatives to increase physical activity.

Guideline 1: “Children should accumulate at least 60 minutes, and up to several hours, of age-appropriate physical activity on all, or most days of the week. This daily accumulation should include moderate and vigorous physical activity with the majority of the time being spent in activity that is intermittent in nature.”. Here are five tips to encourage physical activity in your children: 1. Keep play lighthearted for littles. When young children are playing in an organized sport or activity, try not to get too. Children and youth aged 5–17 should accumulate at least 60 minutes of moderateto vigorous-intensity physical activity daily.

Amounts of physical activity greater than 60 minutes provide additional health benefits. Most of the daily physical activity should be aerobic. Engaging in regular physical activities is important for people of all ages, not just for kids, to ensure a balanced life. Here are some ways to encourage your child to be physically active.

1. If you want to encourage free play, start with yourself first. Set an example by being physically active. Children and adolescents aged 5-17years Should do at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous-intensity physical activity daily.

Physical activity of amounts greater than 60 minutes daily will provide additional health benefits. Should include activities that strengthen muscle and bone, at least 3.

List of related literature:

As much as possible, schools were asked to implement structured physical activity during recess time, as well as other physical activities such as walking clubs, to encourage children and adults to walk before or after each school day.

“Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity: Current Status, Consequences and Prevention” by Debasis Bagchi
from Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity: Current Status, Consequences and Prevention
by Debasis Bagchi
Elsevier Science, 2010

Given that young children are much more active during play periods, multiple outdoor, and indoor activity when space is available (e.g., gross motor activity room, gymnasium), may be critically important for children’s increased opportunities for and participation in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

“Handbook of Early Childhood Special Education” by Brian Reichow, Brian A. Boyd, Erin E. Barton, Samuel L. Odom
from Handbook of Early Childhood Special Education
by Brian Reichow, Brian A. Boyd, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2016

For instance, the physical educator may set up cones with signs and appropriate equipment for a variety of recess activities (e.g., jumping rope, playing soccer, walking a trail, playing with hoops, or throwing with a partner).

“Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children” by Robert P. Pangrazi, Aaron Beighle
from Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children
by Robert P. Pangrazi, Aaron Beighle
Human Kinetics, 2019

Regular breaks that include physical activity actually increase children’s attention to more desk-bound, cognitively demanding tasks (Pellegrini & Bjorklund, 1997; Pellegrini & Bohn, 2005).

“Child Development and Education” by Teresa M. McDevitt, Jeanne Ellis Ormrod, Glenn Cupit, Margaret Chandler, Valarie Aloa
from Child Development and Education
by Teresa M. McDevitt, Jeanne Ellis Ormrod, et. al.
Pearson Higher Education AU, 2012

Researchers and health care providers recommend that school­age youth participate daily in 60 minutes or more of moderate to vigorous physical activity that is developmentally appropriate, that is enjoyable, and that involves a variety of activities.

“Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine” by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
from Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine
by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
SAGE Publications, 2010

Children and adolescents are encouraged to perform moderate physical activity on most days, as well as vigorous activity involving weight-bearing movement and exercises using the whole body or large muscle groups at least three times per week.

“The Biophysical Foundations of Human Movement” by Bruce Abernethy, Stephanie J. Hanrahan, Vaughan Kippers, Laurel T. Mackinnon, Marcus G. Pandy
from The Biophysical Foundations of Human Movement
by Bruce Abernethy, Stephanie J. Hanrahan, et. al.
Human Kinetics, 2005

The exercise component focused on opportunities for activity at school (e.g., 20-meter music shuttle runs two to three times per week and at least 1 hour of physical activity time each school day) and at home (e.g., sent a jump rope home with each child).

“Handbook of Obesity Treatment, Second Edition” by Thomas A. Wadden, George A. Bray
from Handbook of Obesity Treatment, Second Edition
by Thomas A. Wadden, George A. Bray
Guilford Publications, 2019

Throughout the school day there are blocks of time where students can engage in physical activity (i.e., before school, lunch and recess, after school).

“Complete Guide to Sport Education” by Daryl Siedentop, Peter A. Hastie, Hans Van der Mars
from Complete Guide to Sport Education
by Daryl Siedentop, Peter A. Hastie, Hans Van der Mars
Human Kinetics, 2011

In contrast, opportunities for outdoor play in schools is limited to periods of free play during recess and lunch, and more structured play or physical activity provided as part of the PDHPE curriculum.

“Exploring Outdoor Play in the Early Years” by Trisha Maynard, Jane Waters
from Exploring Outdoor Play in the Early Years
by Trisha Maynard, Jane Waters
McGraw-Hill Education, 2014

Regular physical activity among children and adolescents is necessary for normal growth and the development of aerobic capacity, muscle strength, flexibility, motor skills, and agility.

“Textbook of Work Physiology: Physiological Bases of Exercise” by Per-Olof Åstrand, Kaare Rodahl, Hans A. Dahl, Sigmund B. Strømme
from Textbook of Work Physiology: Physiological Bases of Exercise
by Per-Olof Åstrand, Kaare Rodahl, et. al.
Human Kinetics, 2003

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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