Safe Sleep Guidelines for Babies

 

Safe Sleep for Your Baby

Video taken from the channel: NICHDVideos


 

Safe Sleep Guidelines What to Expect

Video taken from the channel: What To Expect


 

Baby’s Safe Sleep Campaign Targets SIDS: An Inside the NICHD Interview

Video taken from the channel: NICHDVideos


 

Live Q&A: Safe sleep for babies and risks of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

Video taken from the channel: Children’s Wisconsin


 

Safe Sleep for Infants | SIDS Prevention

Video taken from the channel: St. Louis Children’s Hospital


 

CDC SIDS: Safe Sleep

Video taken from the channel: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


 

Safe Infant Sleep Practices

Video taken from the channel: MultiCare Health System


Safe Sleep for Babies Healthcare providers can: Advise caregivers to place babies on their back for every sleep. Keep soft bedding such as Every year, there are thousands of sleep-related deaths among babies..

The Federal Government is: Monitoring the use of safe sleep practices. Supporting.

Using Bedding that is Soft. Using soft bedding like blankets, bumper pads, pillows, and toys is not recommended because infants can roll into them or accidentally cover their faces, blocking the airway. While it may seem harsh, only your baby and a firm mattress with a tightly fitted sheet should be in the crib. Room share—keep baby’s sleep area in the same room where you sleep for the first 6 months or, ideally, for the first year. Place your baby’s crib, bassinet, portable crib, or play yard in your bedroom, close to your bed.

The AAP recommends room sharing because it can decrease the risk of SIDS by as much as 50% and is much safer than bed sharing. Dr. Mannen’s report was conclusive that products with inclines 10 degrees or less, with flat and rigid surfaces, are likely safe for infant sleep. Babies should sleep on a firm and flat mattress in a crib, bassinet, or play yard, free of loose and soft items such as toys, crib bumpers, and blankets.

Spread the word by posting a photo of your baby in a safe sleep area with the hashtag #SafeSleepSnap during #SIDSAwarenessMonth. #SafeToSleep http://bit.ly/2AO7I9J. Safe Sleep for Babies HealthyChildren.org for adherence to AAP guidelines for safe infant sleep practices. Results showed that more than one third of pictures of sleeping infants in magazines geared toward childbearing women demonstrated infants in an inappropriate sleep position, and two thirds of pictures of infant sleep environments. Keep your baby’s sleep area (for example, a crib or bassinet) in the same room where you sleep until your baby is at least 6 months old, or ideally, until your baby is one year old.

Keep soft bedding such as blankets, pillows, bumper pad. Chances are, you have lots of questions about how to put your baby to sleep safely. Here are safe sleep tips for babies from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Share a room, but not a bed. Having your baby sleep in your room for at least the first six months (and ideally up to a year) can help lower the risk of SIDS by up to 50 percent.

By the time your child is a toddler — defined as aged 1 to 3 years — he’s no longer at risk for SIDS, and many of the rules for safe baby sleep no longer apply. That said, there are still some important things to consider to ensure that your toddler stays safe while he sleeps: Your toddler should move to a bed when he’s tall enough. Find out how to reduce baby’s risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death Get Information and Materials We have information and materials for many audiences, including parents, grandparents, and health care providers.

List of related literature:

• Educate everyone who cares for your baby about these safe sleep rules!

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Recommendations on creating a safe sleep environment include (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2011): • Placing the baby on his or her back on a firm sleep surface (such as a crib or bassinet with a tight-fitting sheet) • Avoid use of soft bedding, including crib bumpers, blankets, pillows and soft toys

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book: Active Learning for Collaborative Practice” by Barbara L Yoost, Lynne R Crawford
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book: Active Learning for Collaborative Practice
by Barbara L Yoost, Lynne R Crawford
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

In addition to “back to sleep,” the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends use of a firm sleep surface, removal of soft objects and loose bedding from the crib, no co-sleeping, cessation of maternal smoking during and after pregnancy, offering a pacifier at sleep time, and avoidance of overheating.

“Clinical Manual of Emergency Pediatrics” by Ellen F. Crain, Jeffrey C. Gershel, Sandra J. Cunningham
from Clinical Manual of Emergency Pediatrics
by Ellen F. Crain, Jeffrey C. Gershel, Sandra J. Cunningham
Cambridge University Press, 2010

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP, 2011b) has updated recommendations for safe sleeping as well as for avoidance of suffocation and entrapment related to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related disorders in two publications.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

General safe sleeping advice for all babies includes:

“The Expectant Dad's Handbook: All you need to know about pregnancy, birth and beyond” by Dean Beaumont
from The Expectant Dad’s Handbook: All you need to know about pregnancy, birth and beyond
by Dean Beaumont
Ebury Publishing, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated recommendations for safe sleeping and for avoidance of suffocation and entrapment related to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related disorders (AAP, 2016).

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Scientists from the Baby Sleep Information Source (BASIS, see Bibliography) suggest that taking naps in slings can help to keep babies safe and at less risk of SIDS: ‘The advice for new parents is that your baby should sleep in the same room as you, day and night, until they are at least six months old.

“The Gentle Sleep Book: Gentle, No-Tears, Sleep Solutions for Parents of Newborns to Five-Year-Olds” by Sarah Ockwell-Smith
from The Gentle Sleep Book: Gentle, No-Tears, Sleep Solutions for Parents of Newborns to Five-Year-Olds
by Sarah Ockwell-Smith
Little, Brown Book Group, 2015

Infant sleep positioners may be recommended for certain children with gastroesophageal reflux, but only certain devices are recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA); others that do not meet safety standards may be available on the Internet (Lawrence, Gantt, Samuels-Reid, et al, 2012).

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

The Safe to Sleep campaign from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development provides materials for health care professionals and parents (http:// safetosleep.nichd.nih.gov).

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

The SUID/SIDS Resource Center offers “safe to sleep campaign” educational materials (www.sidscenter.org).

“Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by Gloria Leifer
from Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by Gloria Leifer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • I got mild insomnia for some time getting out of bed around Four am on several mornings. A couple of months ago, I began to get only 2 to four hours rest every single night, making me in a a whole lot worse situation of insomnia. This program has helped me a lot in improving my sleeping issue. This is in addition to knowing the essentials of sleeping. Good luck, you will get the results, find it on Google. It is Zoey Sυnodoz
    take care

  • Thank you to doctors having special hands I believe in miracles your Miracle doctor God loves you and I love you too and I believe the people on here and the people in the world leash God is good and you he’s always on time that when you want him to be on time but he’s always on time I like to hear that song on time God yes he is keep raise your hands thanks

  • Babies can sleep in your bed if you follow the safe sleep 7s on bed sharing. It’s actually as safe as safe cot sleeping. Japan has the lowest SIDS rates in the world and they all bed share with their babies. You just have to do it safely and follow the guidelines. It’s not for every family especially if they can’t adhere to the guidelines.